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Well, we had a guy at the club that was pretty tall. He sat in a Foxbat, Savannah and Jabiru. I think the Jabiru J170 was his best fit, but still had his knees around his ears.

 

 

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I'm 1925mm and don't fit in a Skyfox, but haven't found a Jab which wasn't a fairly comfortable fit.

 

No problem fitting in a Foxbat and several European plastic fantastics.

 

 

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Now, that's interesting because the person I knew found the structure around the top of the cockpit in the Foxbat was too close to his noggin. Each plane presented a different problem for one being very tall.

 

 

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What RAAus aircraft would people recommend for flight training for a tall student, who is 6'5"?

Interesting question. From the human view, it seems to depend on the length of the persons legs, rather than their full height. In terms of the aircraft, features such as sliding seats, adjustable rudder pedals, and clearance from the lower instrument panel edge are important.

 

People with relatively long legs need to be able to adjust the seat, fore/aft, so that there is just a small amount of bend in the knees. If you can't do this, then it's likely there will be too much knee bend, causing knees to hit the lower panel. And this might also create control freedom problems.

 

My experience with a J-160 was one of frustration in making short legged students comfortable. Even with rudders adjusted aft, and stacking cushions under and behind them - the student felt 'insecure'. Taller students, eg 1.8 - 2.0m fitted ok, but were at the limits and often couldn't fit a lumbar cushion behind them - creating a hard surface against their backs.

 

The Brumby 610 high-wing resolved most of my student 'comfort' issues - but, anecdotally, so too do several other LSA types. I have been able to accommodate 2.3m, and also 115kg students in it - but it does become rather 'close' with these extremes. With my smaller (often female) students, I need the seat further forward, and some cushions added so they can see adequately. This does bring them close to obstructing the 'full & free' movement of the yoke controls. A catch-22, as are many aircraft issues!

 

Hope these comments help.

 

 

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Especially on a twin or taildragger it's essential to have the fore-aft setting correct. With toe brakes also. as you may not be able to apply them or can't be certain they are not being inadvertently operated. With some planes you are almost limited to special cushions behind the pilot, but preferably hinged to the bit you sit on for location and security of feel purposes. You can't fly it unless you can operate the controls without restriction. AS an instructor there's plenty of times if I couldn't apply full rudder quickly and hold it , there would have been a crash.. The old Cessna seat locking problem comes to mind also. THAT can be heart stopping. There's a little bit more leeway on the vertical positioning but having THAT right too is important to have what you are used too with some pilots more than others. Nev

 

 

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Now, that's interesting because the person I knew found the structure around the top of the cockpit in the Foxbat was too close to his noggin. Each plane presented a different problem for one being very tall.

I guess he is tall in the torso rather than the legs.

 

I'm 6'3" and have plenty of room at head height but it's a bit tight on the legs. (Right leg under the panel)

 

It's surprising the difference a pair of shoes with a thin soul makes. Most of the "runners" made these days seem to have massive souls under the heal and this is enough to jam my knee.

 

The foxbat has very little adjustment, about an inch on the seat bottom which is basically nothing.

 

Small pilots (my wife) would find it impossible.

 

Foxbat's now have an option of a cut-out for the legs under the panel for long leg pilots.....

 

 

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Ha ha, and I do so try to get the spelling right.

 

To answer your question, I guess only if the SOLE has s soul...... ah, the english language.....

 

 

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What RAAus aircraft would people recommend for flight training for a tall student, who is 6'5"?

I'd say a Bristell would accomodate the person well

Very roomy adjustable seats and rudder pedals from memory and a roomy cabin and quite a delight to fly

 

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

The Foxbat has a bar across the top of the cabin. I was concerned in a sudden stop, I would hit my head on it.

 

If you are long in the Torso, it may be an issue.

 

Normal flying it wasn't an issue.

 

Only way to know is have a sit in one yourself.

 

Tall pilots sit further back, with their head high in the cabin. So your eye level is only just under the wing. I find this restricts your view, and with the belts snug, you cannot lean forward to get a better view sideways. (as I used too in Cessna high wings).

 

The low wing are always at the higher end on the 'hourly rate' scale it seems, possibly as they are more expensive to buy.

 

I prefer low wing aircraft, but strangely, I've only flown high wing LSA lately.

 

 

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I agree with Alf. When looking to purchase I flew several high wing a/c with carry through spars and I either had head contact with It or had vision restricted as my head was just behind it, that made me concerned about knocking myself out if caught in severe turbulence as my head was that close to the spar. I'm 6ft. I did find the tecnam p96 high wing ok and the Bristell and Sportcruiser have fixed seats but adjustable peddles with plenty of headroom and great visibility.

 

 

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  • 1 month later...

I hope this issue was solved, but as a 6'5'' person myself, just thought I'd add my experiences. For reference I typically take a 34''/86cm leg in pants (I say typically because even though mens clothes come in sizes that supposedly use international standardised units, they all seem to be different.), and most of that distance is in my thigh I think - can't sit facing straight forward in most bus/shorthaul economy seats without wedging myself in.

 

Honestly the thing that surprised me most was how much room there is in the light sport trainers! The first one I went to see was a jab 170 (I think inside it's the same as a 160?) and walking up to the plane I was just looking at it like "no way, not possible", and as I got closer, it got smaller and smaller - If I recall the top of the wings is about chest height on me. But actually it's very easy to get in and out of (bum first of course) and when you're in with the cushions off it felt surprisingly big. I had to bend my knees of course, but a good inch clearance from the instrument panel and not in the way. If anything the only problem was the centre Y stick - I ever had to pull it hard left, I'd have to move my legs I'd expect. Headroom was incredible - several inches over my head for sure. You could be quite a bit taller in the body, maybe an extra inch or two in the legs before it starts to get silly.

 

I also tried the Foxbat. Really that was the only one where I sat there thinking "this is actually too uncomfortable, it's going to distract me". My legs fit I suppose, but I just felt squished & twisted the whole way and as others have said the top clearance isn't great, with the bar right infront of your brain particularly disturbing. It wasn't impossible, but it was uncomfortable and after just half an hour riding in it I felt I was getting stiff and needed to stretch my legs - you don't need that! Sad really, because there's something about the Foxbat that appeals to me and I really wanted to like it!

 

Next was the Technam P92. First up this had a control stick for each pilot - not a central Y stick like the other 2, so my legs never got in the way. Headroom was sufficient - it's hard to compare to the jab as I was doing TIF's at different schools over a few weeks to try them out, but I think the jab was taller inside. Leg room: again I fit, although the instrument panel felt low, it might be my memory, but I think it was one of the lowest but also further away. I could easily angle my legs into a comfortable position making room for the stick.

 

Last was the Bristell. It felt big to be honest. Nearly no headroom problems (we had to taxi back across bumpy grass an I lightly bumped my head on the side... though probably my fault). I was a bit worried when the lid came down I'd get a bump on the noggin, but no, bags of space. Legs.. I think my knees were further forward than designed for but there was enough total room to be comfortable.

 

Overall I think the Technam was probably my favourite... But I'll probably be going with a Jab just because I preferred the overall school and instructor. Nothing wrong with the Bristell, but the school is too far away realistically - I just wanted to round out all my options.

 

Finally I just wanted to reiterate how easy it was to rock up at a school say "I'm thinking of doing a trial flight, Do you think I'd fit in your planes" and be lead out the back door to try sitting in them right away. Obvs call ahead on a busy weekend, but yeah too easy. They want to sell you lessons, so they probably will put you in their GA aircraft first (some of those are more cramped than the LSA's!), but they're also very accommodating to any questions. Ultimately if you go to a school and they can't be bothered to deal with you (only one school I visited of 5), don't give them money whatever plane they have.

 

 

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  • 4 years later...

Awesome thread guys, I'm 6,5 and am currently training in a foxbat, with dual yoke controls. I have to sit both knees sideways on the door if I want full aileron movement. Currently at the stage of circuits I'm finding it hard to manipulate the rudder correctly and usually after an hours lesson I get out pretty stiff.

 

Good to hear the tecnam sounds a bit friendlier too the taller pilot. Sounds like I need to try another aircraft.

 

Cheers

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On 10/07/2017 at 10:52 AM, poteroo said:

The Brumby 610 high-wing resolved most of my student 'comfort' issues - but, anecdotally, so too do several other LSA types. I have been able to accommodate 2.3m, and also 115kg students in it - but it does become rather 'close' with these extremes.

 

2.3m sounds pretty tall. Australia's tallest person.

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the son in law (150kgs - he's lighter now) and I (95 kgs) went for a fly in a tecnam - notch of flap for takeoff helped

 

it was heavy flying but when gravity was used - it all felt all just as usual (deliberate no comment about fuel quantity) 

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