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Hi all,

 

I'm in a situation where I'm unable to frequently get behind the controls of an aircraft. I currently struggle to do 10 hours a year which is about 20 hours less than I'd like to do.... I have very little scope to increase my annual hours in the next few years and no scope to own my own aircraft / syndicate. However I spent considerable time, effort and enjoyment learning to fly and do not want to lose the skills I have learnt. So what advice would you give to someone who can only fly every couple of months without my own aircraft?

 

  • Continue training flights with not much direction for specific outcomes, eg continue familiarisation of current skills like circuits, engine failures, departing and approaching circuits etc
     
     
  • further endorsements or advanced learning (like advanced pilot award) with low scope to complete or train in a decent time frame.
     
     
  • Hire and fly. Although current arrangement doesn't seem too keen to allow solo hire and fly with months between flights. Which I can understand with an asset like an aircraft.
     
     
  • Try to find an arrangement with a private owner for a casual "hire and fly. " I have tried with little luck with too many considerations like insurance etc. Plus I don't actually have many connections with other pilots.
     
     

 

 

I consider myself an ultra cautious pilot, understand my limitations and when it is appropriate to seek an instructor for help. However I'm not finding the continual flying in the training areas and continual circuits as engaging as it used to be (it is fun, but I want to explore!).

 

Just to be clear, I hold a RAAus RPC with all the usual endorsements qualifying now 9 years ago and still love flying, but love all the things I need to be focussing on when I'm not flying. I intend to increase my focus on flying when the time is right.

 

So I'm looking for ideas for how to remain engaged and enthused as a recreational pilot while the bulk of my life is spent doing what I need to be focussing on.

 

Cheers, Tyson

 

 

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Hi Tyson

 

I wouldn't put myself quite into your boat I fly around 20 hours a year, sometimes more but I do consider myself to be an infrequent pilot. I hold a PPL and go through the flight review process every 2 years (I don't know if you have this same process under RAA). I found this is good motivation for me to keep my skills sharp and I ensure that some of my flying is purely for fun and some of my flying is about skills.

 

I like to use the pilots license is a license to learn line - your always learning and I don't think anyone can tell you how much you need to fly but its important your comfortable within your currency to fly.

 

I also like to keep my radio skills sharp by making calls when i'm driving my car - I find this is one of the first thing that lacks in my flying and if i'm well rehearsed I don't get flustered making calls and it doesn't get a chance to distract me nor am I critical of myself for making sloppy radio calls.

 

Safe Flying

 

 

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My suggestion would be to continue with 'advanced' training and when you can, fit in a hire and fly the following day or week, that little bit of currency should be enough to keep the owner happier?

 

If you can choose a good instructor that will give you plenty of freedom with the 'normal' flying tasks, with the usual pointers here or there it shouldn't feel to much different from a command flight and you have the added bonus of learning whatever new skill it is you're focusing on at that stage.

 

10hrs really isn't a lot, 10hrs a month still isn't a lot and it's surprising how quickly you lose some of the skill set, especially if you are removed from the avation environment as well.

 

 

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I try to get out every week, even if it is for just 0.5hrs, which is usually 3 or 4 circuits. I am lucky as airfield is 10mins from home so sometimes I can do this before or after work. In those circuits I usually do

 

- Cross Wind landing if possible

 

- short field landing approach (If possible) and or side slip

 

- Forced engine on downwind on last circuit.

 

If I have more time, I fly out to the training area and practice my turns, ensuring they are co-ordinated and maybe do a forced landing practice out there too. And sometimes fly to a close by airfield to where they have a 600m strip on a slope, always a good challenging one.

 

But remembering all the time, to enjoy yourself and flying!!

 

 

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With out knowing where you are or ,airstrip you fly.

 

Three suggestions

 

1. Join a local flying club and if it is a busy club see if any spare seats are available to go with some of the members.

 

2. Have you tried a gliding club if close by, its also cheap to have a run in one and good experience. (highly recommended in my opinion)

 

3. Ask you CFI if he has any people who hire the schools aircraft and see if they have a spare seat.

 

Any flying even as a free passenger in the right seat you gain experience (as what you would do), decisions being made (good or bad).

 

 

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Hi Tyson,

 

Just buy an aircraft and go flying, nothing beats having your own plane. Fly when you want, where you want and as often as you want. Get addicted. Doesn't have to be a $60,000 jab, there are plenty of $10,000 drifters, x airs, thrusters out there, some of the best flying you can do would be in a rag and tube ultralight.

 

Flying is the thing in life that needs to be done, the rest is just there to support the habit.

 

Have fun flying, cheers Ian

 

Ps where are you?

 

 

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It depends on what you like about flying. If you like actually physically flying then you can do that with one of those motors you strap to your back and a parachute.

 

If you like something else about flying, get a job flying, or get seriously frugal. As in, sandwiches and caffeine BYO to work, smaller/no car, no alcohol or cigs, and partner-cutting-your-hair frugal.

 

 

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Hi all,I'm in a situation where I'm unable to frequently get behind the controls of an aircraft. I currently struggle to do 10 hours a year which is about 20 hours less than I'd like to do.... I have very little scope to increase my annual hours in the next few years and no scope to own my own aircraft / syndicate. However I spent considerable time, effort and enjoyment learning to fly and do not want to lose the skills I have learnt. So what advice would you give to someone who can only fly every couple of months without my own aircraft?

 

  • Continue training flights with not much direction for specific outcomes, eg continue familiarisation of current skills like circuits, engine failures, departing and approaching circuits etc
     
     
  • further endorsements or advanced learning (like advanced pilot award) with low scope to complete or train in a decent time frame.
     
     
  • Hire and fly. Although current arrangement doesn't seem too keen to allow solo hire and fly with months between flights. Which I can understand with an asset like an aircraft.
     
     
  • Try to find an arrangement with a private owner for a casual "hire and fly. " I have tried with little luck with too many considerations like insurance etc. Plus I don't actually have many connections with other pilots.
     
     

 

 

I consider myself an ultra cautious pilot, understand my limitations and when it is appropriate to seek an instructor for help. However I'm not finding the continual flying in the training areas and continual circuits as engaging as it used to be (it is fun, but I want to explore!).

 

Just to be clear, I hold a RAAus RPC with all the usual endorsements qualifying now 9 years ago and still love flying, but love all the things I need to be focussing on when I'm not flying. I intend to increase my focus on flying when the time is right.

 

So I'm looking for ideas for how to remain engaged and enthused as a recreational pilot while the bulk of my life is spent doing what I need to be focussing on.

 

Cheers, Tyson

Too, for real, see a careers advisor, then an accountant, then a FINANCIAL COUNSELLOR. Seriously. Actually do that. They seem to be able to do weird things with money.

 

 

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Too, for real, see a careers advisor, then an accountant, then a FINANCIAL COUNSELLOR. Seriously. Actually do that. They seem to be able to do weird things with money.

I saw my accountant and my financial counsellor .... outcome she said, no...meanie wife.

 

 

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Hang, on. Don't you actually have a Tecnam P92 Eaglet? Doesn't that mean someone actually said "Yes"?

I wish. No some other lucky guys wife said yes and im allowed to fly it as long as i keep paying him for the privilege :).

 

 

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I haven't flown for about a year. I plan on going back soon. I find using a sim help to keep your eye in. Works well for me. I do all the radio calls airspace rules preflight check lists. This helps keep current when i have long breaks from flying

 

 

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Thanks for all the good advice!

 

Really wish i could afford to buy a plane, not for another 20 years i'm guessing....

 

I think half my issue is prioritising flying for a weekend, and justifying that to the boss :P

 

Looks like i should dust off my Flight sim gear too. That will definitely help with keeping an eye in.

 

For those asking i've been flying mainly out of Murray Bridge (YMBD).

 

 

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Thanks for all the good advice!Really wish i could afford to buy a plane, not for another 20 years i'm guessing....

 

I think half my issue is prioritising flying for a weekend, and justifying that to the boss :P

 

Looks like i should dust off my Flight sim gear too. That will definitely help with keeping an eye in.

 

For those asking i've been flying mainly out of Murray Bridge (YMBD).

Be careful with the flight sim.

 

I find the more time on the sim the worse my flying becomes.

 

SOmthing maybe to do with control inputs on pc versus real life.

 

 

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