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I do low flying all the time. My alt stays within 50' of the one I'm aiming for at all times ... it just happens to be as high as I'm legally allowed most of the time

 

 

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Both of the deceased were personal friends to me and without digging into the Coroner's report, engine failure wasn't the cause of that double fatality in the Julimar Forest. It was assessed that the aircraft broke up at altitude as a result of accumulated undue airframe stress. As you pointed out, in that instance, the dice had been rolled once too often by two experienced pilots.

What sort of aircraft was this ? I remember reading about a structural failure in a low wing LSA . If so I understand what you are saying about the dice being rolled ! I have been called a " Whooss" by many, a couple are no longer due to taking risks, when you take a risk or over stress a plane there becomes a chance that an accident will occur but it becomes a point where it is not an accident but intentional, it gets serious if you push too far !

 

 

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What sort of aircraft was this ? I remember reading about a structural failure in a low wing LSA . If so I understand what you are saying about the dice being rolled ! I have been called a " Whooss" by many, a couple are no longer due to taking risks, when you take a risk or over stress a plane there becomes a chance that an accident will occur but it becomes a point where it is not an accident but intentional, it gets serious if you push too far !

In the case of flying schools and clubs, quite often the offender gets away scot-free, but the next person to hire the now weakened airframe loses his life in mild turbulence.

 

 

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In the case of flying schools and clubs, quite often the offender gets away scot-free, but the next person to hire the now weakened airframe loses his life in mild turbulence.

That's what i hate about using school aircraft.it sucks because you have no idea what the pilot did on the last flight.

 

 

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What sort of aircraft was this ? I remember reading about a structural failure in a low wing LSA . If so I understand what you are saying about the dice being rolled ! I have been called a " Whooss" by many, a couple are no longer due to taking risks, when you take a risk or over stress a plane there becomes a chance that an accident will occur but it becomes a point where it is not an accident but intentional, it gets serious if you push too far !

Evektor Sportstar

 

 

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There was also a Eurostar that encountered a storm in Europe and suffered structural failure, the Sportstar in WA was constant overload I believe ! Not the fault of the aircraft ! I believe these two happened the same year ! The Sportstar is a wonderful plane to fly and tempting to push the limits ! I owned one for many years and loved it !

 

 

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Thankyou , it was the one I read about ! Warning signs were there I believe ! Very sad all the same !

A 'G' meter had been installed in the aircraft a few short weeks before the crash.

 

 

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I`m on my 6th 2 stroke engine: 2, Rotax 503 and 4, Rotax 582 grey head: I`ve had enough partial and total engine failures, for various reasons, to know what it`s all about, some solo, some with a student on board, walked away every time without breaking the aircraft or being injured.My current engine is a Rotax 503 DCDI that hasn`t missed a beat, however, I treat each and every flight as a new one and accept that just because the engine didn`t fail on the last flight, doesn`t mean it won`t fail on the next flight, I`m ready to deal with an failure from the moment I apply the throttle and I will only fly over tiger country if I can safely glide clear to a suitable landing area, I have always flown this way and will continue to do so.

 

Each situation has it`s own scenario and there`s no magic solution to engine failure, it isn`t just limited to 2 strokes, there`s been numerous failures of 4 strokes`and for various reasons, it`s difficult to give advice to the less experienced, their instructor should have done that and there`s a vast difference between landing safely in a Drifter, or any other AC which has a tail wheel and say, the latest LSA, low wing, with a tricycle undercarriage, but basically, having a suitable landing area and the skill required to fly the aircraft safely to a full stop, is the critical part of surviving an engine failure.

 

Always be prepared for engine failure and regularly practice for it.

 

Frank.

Ditto Frank

 

 

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It's interesting to note in the "Aviation Consumer" article that Oscar linked to, the "LSA (crash) causes combined" graph, shows that engine failure only accounted for 10% of crashes - whereas, runway loss of control accounted for 65% of crashes!

 

So - even though there may have been an additional small percentage of satisfactory emergency landings caused by engine failure - that don't show up in the crash statistics - the bottom line is, that just landing, is vastly more dangerous than having an engine failure!

 

 

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Both of the deceased were personal friends to me and without digging into the Coroner's report, engine failure wasn't the cause of that double fatality in the Julimar Forest. It was assessed that the aircraft broke up at altitude as a result of accumulated undue airframe stress. As you pointed out, in that instance, the dice had been rolled once too often by two experienced pilots.

G,day Riley we talked via posts a good while back about your fabric tester and the 500 i,m bringing back on line after its wings off hanger storage since 2009 could you contact me please regarding same sir cheers Mick

 

0414607563

 

 

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Maxair Drifter. 65 hp Rotax. Failed on takeoff at 300 feet, landed okay, got out, walked around back to motor, thought "I wonder if this sumbitch will crank?"

 

It did. Wide ass open. I had left the throttle wide-ass open after the failure. You would not believe the power of 65 horses until you've been drug in circles behind your ultralight.

 

Think before you act!

 

 

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Now that would be a bad look, with deviance a major player. How did you stop the bugger in the end. Not sure of how much static thrust a 582 can give but I think its around 90 kg or so. Does anybody know the figure (nominal)

 

 

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G,day Riley we talked via posts a good while back about your fabric tester and the 500 i,m bringing back on line after its wings off hanger storage since 2009 could you contact me please regarding same sir cheers Mick0414607563

Haven't forgotten you Mick. The geezer holding my fabric tester is still visiting with ailing parents over east. Will get unto it as soon as he returns. cheers

 

 

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