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Previous experience toward RPL


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G'day, I'm new on here and have just started flight training again after about 7 years out of action. I'm wanting to gain either my RPL or RPC with nav endorsement, but am not sure the best way to go about it. My previous training 7 years ago included 17 hours dual and 3 hours solo in Warriors and 172's (did not get my GFPT). So as far as i can tell i would need to start from scratch if doing the RPC due to all my previous training being on VH registered aircraft, but if i go for the RPL could i use those 20 hours towards the minimum requirements? They are all properly entered in my log book. If the hours do count towards the RPL, could i train on RA registered Jabirus or would i need to continue on VH registered aircraft? I am also obviously aware that it will take me a while to regain my skills. So what would everyone recommended i do? Cheers

 

 

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G'day, I'm new on here and have just started flight training again after about 7 years out of action. I'm wanting to gain either my RPL or RPC with nav endorsement, but am not sure the best way to go about it. My previous training 7 years ago included 17 hours dual and 3 hours solo in Warriors and 172's (did not get my GFPT). So as far as i can tell i would need to start from scratch if doing the RPC due to all my previous training being on VH registered aircraft, but if i go for the RPL could i use those 20 hours towards the minimum requirements? They are all properly entered in my log book. If the hours do count towards the RPL, could i train on RA registered Jabirus or would i need to continue on VH registered aircraft? I am also obviously aware that it will take me a while to regain my skills. So what would everyone recommended i do? Cheers

Essentially you would need to demonstrate proficiency and meet the minimum hour requirements. Your previous aeronautical experience count towards both RPL/RPC. You'd find that by the time you reach proficiency and complete some solo consolidation you'd have the minimum hours satisfied to obtain the RPL or RPC. The Nav endorsement would be additional training and theory.

The best investment you'll make is spending some time going to visit a few GA and RAA flying schools and seek their guidance. If they tell you none of your previous hours can be taken into account, walk away. Also try and talk to some of their students, note whether there are pre/post flight briefings and have a look at the condition of the aircraft. Generally, your time travelling to a distant airport is cheaper than settling with a closer sub-standard flying school. This might even mean saving up some cash and doing a live in course. Dan Compton at a Dubbo and Sheldon Jones at Moruya are a couple I could recommend.

 

 

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G'day, I'm new on here ..... So what would everyone recommended i do? Cheers

I saw from your other post that you've just flown at Lilydale so I'd recommend that you talk to Craig and the guys there about this.
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G'day, I'm new on here and have just started flight training again after about 7 years out of action. I'm wanting to gain either my RPL or RPC with nav endorsement, but am not sure the best way to go about it. My previous training 7 years ago included 17 hours dual and 3 hours solo in Warriors and 172's (did not get my GFPT). So as far as i can tell i would need to start from scratch if doing the RPC due to all my previous training being on VH registered aircraft, but if i go for the RPL could i use those 20 hours towards the minimum requirements? They are all properly entered in my log book. If the hours do count towards the RPL, could i train on RA registered Jabirus or would i need to continue on VH registered aircraft? I am also obviously aware that it will take me a while to regain my skills. So what would everyone recommended i do? Cheers

As I understand it, your hours should count whichever way you want to go, it sounds like everything is in order, but take your log book along with you when you're interviewing flight schools just so you can run them by pilots around (we can't see them obvs).

 

I think the most important thing here is what's the mission? What do you want to fly? whichever way you go, it could take 15 hours, it could take another 25 to be ready for the check ride - we're all different. Sure the Jabiru's and Technams are cheaper to fly, but if you're looking to get your RPL and get back up in a PA28, you'd probably be looking at another 5-6 hours conversion from the RPB if you do all your training on the lighter Jab I'd guess, and that'd likely wipe out the bulk of the money saved by getting to the RPB just to convert it. That said, you could probably do 4/5 refresher lessons on the cheaper jab then switch to the GA plane for the rest of the RPL without much problem?

 

Of course, if the mission's just to get up and flying and get your cross country ticket, RPC -> XC seems the most logical choice to me, you can always come back and do some PPL conversion later if you want.

 

I think really just drive out and talk to some schools, see what they say. There's what should happen, what happened with this pilot or that pilot, and then there's reality for you and your school. Talk to them about where you want to get to, what you've done before, and when you find one that you like do a flight assessment and make a plan with your instructor.

 

Best of luck :)

 

 

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Cheers everyone. Yes so the goal is to eventually fly 4 seater VFR, so either RPL plus endorsements, or PPL. If i was starting from scratch i would definitely do RPC then transition across to GA later on, but I'm just trying to make the most of the training ive already done. And yes i'll definitely have a chat to lilydale and some other schools to see what they have to say as well.

 

 

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... but if you're looking to get your RPL and get back up in a PA28, you'd probably be looking at another 5-6 hours conversion from the RPB if you do all your training on the lighter Jab I'd guess, and that'd likely wipe out the bulk of the money saved by getting to the RPB just to convert it.../QUOTE]Obvioulsy that should say RPC ... not sure how I managed to mistype it twice? 035_doh.gif.37538967d128bb0e6085e5fccd66c98b.gif

Don't tell me computers are getting autocorrect now lol!

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Cheers everyone. Yes so the goal is to eventually fly 4 seater VFR, so either RPL plus endorsements, or PPL. If i was starting from scratch i would definitely do RPC then transition across to GA later on, but I'm just trying to make the most of the training ive already done. And yes i'll definitely have a chat to lilydale and some other schools to see what they have to say as well.

Best of luck, I don't know if you're looking for another PA28 (I know they have them at Lilydale) but I've seen them operating with the school out of Coldstream down the road as well (no idea about the school though sorry).

 

 

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So after having a chat to some instructors, ive decided the best path to take is to initally work towards my RPL, and then either add cross country endorsement or continue to ppl, at which stage it should be fairly straight forward to get an RPC at the same time after a small amount of conversion training. I like the idea of having both GA and RA licenses due to the cheaper rates for RA aircraft when by myself, and the passenger carrying ability of GA for the occasional friend/family trip away

 

 

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There's no problem having a foot in both camps. Some experienced GA pilots have been put off a little by the " required....conversion" to RAAus. When RAAus flew a lot of draggy LP stuff that 5 hours or so could be more easily justified but many will never fly those types of aircraft , and if they do RECENCY might be a consideration as well as the original minimal learning..

 

Generallising, the Average RAAus plane is more demanding of basic flying skill than many regular GA types and IF you are new to 2 strokes you may have a problem finding people who are really currently operating them on a regular basis in a practical way. They are not difficult to deal with but there are a few "Tips/rules" that are needed to get used to them and be safe. I won't list them here as it doesn't affect a lot of our current flyers.

 

It's similar regarding tailwheel skills. and some U/L's are quite requiring of your attention to NOT make a fool of yourself (or worse, bend it and you). None of this is big deal . You just have to get it right and in the absence of facts, witchcraft, smoke and mirrors etc fills the vacuum. Nev

 

 

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Nice one, best of luck!Did you decide to go with Lilydale in the end?

Yep I'm learning at Lilydale. Nice bunch of people and they have a few nice warriors at a reasonable dual rate. And also a few Jabirus for when i want to do some RA down the track.

 

facthunter, I did my first lesson a couple of weeks ago in the Jab just to see how it was (and when i wasnt sure if id go RA or GA), which was my first lesson for about 7 years, and found it generally quite a challenging little plane to get the hang of. Not difficult, just different. Just did my second lesson in a warrior the other day (after deciding to go the GA path instead of RA at the moment), and it immediately felt a lot more natural, and dare i say "nicer" to fly (at least for me anyway)

 

 

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There's a few different Jabs and they generally need good "managing" to fly a neat circuit. No overcontrol and keep the nosewheel up. The control is by push pull cables and doesn't have the nice feel of a rods and cranks system (the ultimate) The OTHER (Piper) would feel like a slug after you got used to the Jab but far more forgiving and easy to fly. Flying the Jab would improve your flying generally, once you get it right and have a broader experience base in your skillset. ALL planes behave like planes unless they are totally weird. ( Like a badly loaded Canard) Keep flying and learning and have fun doing it. Nev

 

 

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