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BASIC CLASS 2 - PRIVATE PILOT MEDICAL ANNOUNCED!


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From AOPA 30/11/17 11am(ish)

 

BASIC CLASS 2 - PRIVATE PILOT MEDICAL ANNOUNCED!

 

Thursday 30th November

 

Thousands of pilots are set to benefit from major reforms to the aviation medical certificate system.

 

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority is cutting aviation medical certificate red tape to make it easier for pilots to continue to fly safely.

 

The reforms include creating a new category of private pilot medical certificate, allowing non passenger carrying commercial operations under a full Class 2 medical certificate and increasing the delegation of medical decision making to medical professionals.

 

The new medical certificate category to be known as a basic Class 2 will be available to private pilots flying piston engine powered aircraft carrying up to five non fare paying passengers. Operations will be limited to the daytime visual flight rules and will be permitted in all classes of airspace.

 

This basic Class 2 medical certificate will require an assessment by a doctor using the Austroads commercial vehicle driver standards. General practitioners will be able to carry out assessments.

 

These commercial vehicle medical standards currently apply to drivers of heavy vehicles, public passenger vehicles and vehicles carrying bulk dangerous goods. They cover medical issues such as cardiovascular conditions, diabetes, psychiatric conditions, blackouts substance abuse and vision and hearing disorders.

 

The new basic Class 2 medical will be valid for a maximum of five years up to the age of 40 and a maximum of two years above the age of 40.

 

The current unrestricted Class 2 medical certificate will remain in place for private pilots operating aircraft up to 8618 kilograms with a maximum of nine non fare paying passengers. This unrestricted Class 2 medical will be used under all flight rules and allow for operations in all classes of airspace.

 

Importantly, pilots flying commercial operations with no passengers – such as flying training and aerial agriculture – will now be able to do so on the basis of an unrestricted Class 2 medical certificate. Previously these operations required the pilot to hold a Class 1 medical certificate.

 

CASA’s CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, said the reforms to the aviation medical system maintain appropriate safety standards while offering flexibility and reduced red tape.

 

“CASA has been engaged with the aviation community and made a series of fundamental reforms to aviation medical certification,” Mr Carmody said.

 

“We have initially focussed on changes that benefit general aviation because this sector has been telling us the current medical certification system was causing real difficulties.

 

“In the interests of public safety it is important that pilots meet relevant medical standards but the system must not make unnecessary demands and should meet the needs of the aviation community.

 

“I am pleased we are making changes that will see more appropriate medical standards applied to flying training and aerial agriculture – two vital sectors of Australian aviation.

 

“CASA will now continue to review the aviation medical system to identify possible improvements in areas such as using medical data more effectively, further streamlining processes, further reducing CASA involvement in medicals and harmonising with global best practices.

 

“It is CASA’s role to maintain appropriate aviation safety standards but the requirements must not unnecessarily burden Australian aviation and hinder development and growth.”

 

The reforms to aviation medical certification will be progressively introduced during 2018.

 

 

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Aus Roads Standards at Austroads - Assessing Fitness to Drive 2016 (as amended up to August 2017)What is not indicated is if you can get a Basic Class 2 if you only qualify for a conditional private or commercial MV licence eg Diabetes with Insulin control.

Lets hope that will be up to the doctor/specialists recommendation in each case, else I don't see much difference to the RPL DL medical, in this case.

 

 

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It looks to me that it will be the same as the current Recreational Aviation Medical Practicioners Certificate (RAMPC).

 

If that is the case the RAMPC will no longer be worth anything as the Basic will provide greater freedom with the same conditions.

 

The restriction on only one passenger and no aerobatics would no longer apply.

 

I have asked CASA for clarification and also when we can expect it to be available.

 

Looks like good news.

 

 

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Lets hope that will be up to the doctor/specialists recommendation in each case, else I don't see much difference to the RPL DL medical, in this case.

There is a big difference. Under the original CASA modified Austroads medical I could not pass but under this one by the look of it I can pass. It just means a 12month check of my CABG..which I get now anyway. Before if anyone had a CABG you were banned.

 

 

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My wife (former RN) has been looking at all this CABG stuff, diet etc for the last few years. If you haven't had a CABG and are fit and active with no symptoms you may indeed have some narrowing but there are small vessels which develop around the narrowing. A week or so ago I saw a short film where they inject the dye and find the blockage all right but ignore the fact that dye immediately starts appearing the OTHER side of the blockage. The small vessels don't show up due to limitations of the imaging!

 

The medical profession aren't as smart as they think and tell you.

 

Here's a nice link on type 2 diabetes: Schwarzbein Principle - The Transition Program To Optimum Health

 

You may like to look up Dr Malcolm Kendrick's blog too. Cynical Scots GP who likes doing science.

 

 

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People, this is "reform" in name only. Nothing like the UK or US, some stupid restrictions such as piston engine only and not likely to get people into aviation or keep them. It's a dud. The RAMPC will likely be abolished and the Basic Class 2 replace it. ZERO change in medical standards really and I bet it will come with a list of conditions that require you to see a DAME anyway, just like the RAMPC.

 

Looks at this point like the RPC is exempted but I wouldn't count on that forever as Carmody apparently has asked "how come RAAus pilots can fly without a aviation medical".

 

 

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There is a big difference. Under the original CASA modified Austroads medical I could not pass but under this one by the look of it I can pass. It just means a 12month check of my CABG..which I get now anyway. Before if anyone had a CABG you were banned.

Don't get your hopes up.

 

This leaves more questions unanswered then answered.

 

Remember the RAMPC was a drivers licence with provisos. It was the provisos which made it unattainable for most people. If they could pass the provisos many people could pass the class 2 medical.

 

So now if this has similar provisos - then it will be just the same.

 

It depends what the rationale behind this is.

 

If it's to allow people who would not pass the class 2 to keep flying -that's one thing.

 

If it's just to make it easier for only those people who could pass the class 2 anyway - is a completely different thing.

 

There's a good chance it is a Trojan horse and is there to make CASA look like they are doing something and stop the complaints while actually doing nothing.

 

 

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Mike

 

I never had any glaring symptoms at all. I was a little out of breath walking up hills etc but just thought I was unfit. I didnt have a heart attack at all. I felt unwell after doing a lot of heavy work in hot conditions up at the farm shifting trees and logs. The next day I felt off and that evening got a pain done my neck. I looked up symptoms of a heart attack and pain doen the neck was one..never had any chest or arm pain. Drs at emergency could not find anything at all..ECG all fine blood tests fine but because I was in pvt health they said I could either go home or go to the pvt hospital and get a angio. So I thought better to be safe than sorry and the next day got the angio.....on the table watching the monitor with this tube inside my heart and this dye coming through and not feeling anything at all is freaky. Cardiologist says..thats 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 bypasses for you old son..you have all arteries 90% blocked. Three days later I was on the table. I never had a clue...so you can see I bet there are a lot of guys running around just like me then

 

 

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I read the brief different. The std Austroads medical has provisions for CABG and Diabeties provided 12 months checks they are conditional licences, The original CASA modified Austroads one was basically a Class 2 anyway and NO conditionals like in the Austroads only version..this one is different the way I read it. But as you say the devil will be in the actual detail when it is released

 

 

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"There's a good chance it is a Trojan horse and is there to make CASA look like they are doing something and stop the complaints while actually doing nothing".

 

You've got it in one Jaba-who. This is still several levels of red tape and buggeration above the UK and USA. Typically Australian even though the extra trouble won't make the already very low medical causes accident rate any lower. I strongly suspect that if you pass the Basic you would be able to get a full Class 2 anyway without the stupid restrictions.

 

Can someone explain how the type of propulsion has any bearing on the pilot's medical? We've all seen the small turboprops under development, right here on this site.

 

 

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MikeI never had any glaring symptoms at all. I was a little out of breath walking up hills etc but just thought I was unfit. I didnt have a heart attack at all. I felt unwell after doing a lot of heavy work in hot conditions up at the farm shifting trees and logs. The next day I felt off and that evening got a pain done my neck. I looked up symptoms of a heart attack and pain doen the neck was one..never had any chest or arm pain. Drs at emergency could not find anything at all..ECG all fine blood tests fine but because I was in pvt health they said I could either go home or go to the pvt hospital and get a angio. So I thought better to be safe than sorry and the next day got the angio.....on the table watching the monitor with this tube inside my heart and this dye coming through and not feeling anything at all is freaky. Cardiologist says..thats 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 bypasses for you old son..you have all arteries 90% blocked. Three days later I was on the table. I never had a clue...so you can see I bet there are a lot of guys running around just like me then

Yep, sounds like your body had developed its own bypasses around the narrowings if you could do the work you did under those conditions. They will have gone away now and you got to take a big risk on the CABG. Fortunately, sounds like you got away with it. I know several people who have had CABGs. Some aren't at all the same people afterwards (effects of deep anaethesia for long time). Neil Armstrong (first human to walk on another world, then and forever) died of complications 6 weeks after his and my wife's eldest brother one year after his and he never made a real recovery.

 

 

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My memory was affected greatly for the first 6 to 12 months due to the type of drugs they use during a CABG. I have a doctor mate who is a anethestist...however you spell it :) he told me I would have those dramas and he was right too but all ok now. I have a once a year appointment with my cardiologist and every 2 years I get a echo done. He is one of the best in Qld and well known and thorough. The silly part about all this medical who-ha is that once you have had a CABG usually you make the changes necessary and are acutely aware of how and what your body is up to and monitor far more than others who havent had any of these dramas. Also as a long term type 2 diabetic (a major cause towards my blocked arteries) we usually keep a keen eye on our levels and dont take any risks with it and keep it well under control especially since the cardiac eposode. So I am far more intune with what is going on and actually would consider myself at a lower risk now than joe bloggs who is going around on his merry way absolutely oblivious to what is going on internally with his/her body

 

 

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Yep, sounds like your body had developed its own bypasses around the narrowings if you could do the work you did under those conditions. They will have gone away now and you got to take a big risk on the CABG. Fortunately, sounds like you got away with it. I know several people who have had CABGs. Some aren't at all the same people afterwards (effects of deep anaethesia for long time). Neil Armstrong (first human to walk on another world, then and forever) died of complications 6 weeks after his and my wife's eldest brother one year after his and he never made a real recovery.

The whole issue is very complex so that why you need to really ask a lot of questions and explore all options. But sometimes you are between a rock and a hard place with not many of them.

 

The issue of as its called " post operative cognitive dysfunction" is one of those areas where we are making good advances with understanding it but not always being able to do anything about it.

 

The problem is not just the anaesthetic but also that most patients are put onto a heart lung bypass machine which is the probable cause of much of it but also the surgery itself and the early post-operative phase where things can go awry and cause poor brain blood flow with same result. Basically a few things can all contribute and in any specific case you never know which was the major and which were just also-rans.

 

 

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There is a big difference. Under the original CASA modified Austroads medical I could not pass but under this one by the look of it I can pass. It just means a 12month check of my CABG..which I get now anyway. Before if anyone had a CABG you were banned.

It will also depend on whether qualifying only for a conditional commercial MV Licence gets you over the line. This is one of the stumbling blocks of the RAMPC/DL standards.

 

 

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The current situation from CASA discussion paper Is an absolute joke. All that time and expense for no demonstrated need. 15 cases of pilot incapacitation in 4 years. 75% are in high capacity airfpcraft and most involve food poisoning... only 3 accidents of which based on the numbers involved high capacity aircraft and or food. So based on the numbers we have 40000 medical or so every 2 years at $275+$75, plus time off and clogging up medical, for 0.25 low capacity accidents per year due to pilot incapacitation and 50% of those are food related. So all this expense for 0.125 accidents per year.

 

I think casa knew thier numbers would highlight the ridiculous situation and looked to act before they where caught out and thier avmed empire squashed.

 

Its great news for many, but massively underwhelming given what the data highlights.

 

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I have a HR licence and I have to pass the medical for that each year with my local doctor. Although I dont use that HR licence for work and really only drive a private vehicle. My HB1AC was 9.7 before my heart eposode and I really didnt think it was that much of a issue as I had been a full on diabetic for about 12 years...I was very wrong. That was 4 years ago. My HB1AC is now 6.7 and getting better due to weight loss and better food choices and the exercise I do...although no where near enough as I should. I still have some bad habits but they are a work in progress but slowly getting there. I think 6.4 is the cutoff for "offical diabeties".

 

I read the Austroads compliance today quickly and even for a commercial licence it means the licence would be a conditional one. Which really the conditions for use are what I actually do now pretty much each year. I really hope CASA dont prostitute this like before as some are suggesting here and it could very well be a big possibility but I think it will invigorate flying greatly for a lot of pilots. I would be happy with the RPL with no CTA this way I can fly a bit heavier aircraft...not interested in any Cessnas or that style of aircraft. Just 2 up and 750 or 800 kg would fit my bill perfectly....Bring on the Rans S20 or S21 Outbound :)

 

 

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It looks good to me. I have been using RAMPC for a while now. I have no doubt that I could pass a class 2 medical, but my age makes me need extra tests which cost extra money, so the RAMPC works well for me. I heard today from CASA that they expect 6 months before it is passed into law and when that happens RAMPC will automaticly become Basic class 2.

 

That will allow me to do aerobatics and also hire a bigger plane and take more than one passenger.

 

 

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