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Querstion - Which glasses for flying ?


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As I have moved well past the wrong side of 40, the long sightedness issue is beginning to kick in - not enough that its affected the medical yet, but I can see a time when I will need to get glasses for flying (just to be able to read the inner scales on the CR3 if nothing else !). From what I can tell, the two options are bi-focal or progressive - which one have you found to work better ?

 

 

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1. Get an eye test to determine what needs correcting.

 

2. When you have your prescription, have your lenses made to fit this type of frame: CliC: The Original Magnetic Connection Eyewear Collective

 

The beauty of this type of frame is that they come with a permanent neck band, so they hand around your neck when you take them off. Also the magnetic join in he centre of the nose bridge makes it easy to put the glasses back on.

 

You could get one of these to help your typing:

 

220px-Perkins_SMART_brailler.jpg

 

 

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I had some prescription glasses made that have a focal range in the lower half that provide perfect focus on the panel and my lap and are allegedly clear in the top half.

 

I have very good sight at long distance....just up close and in poor light I have an issue. "old man syndrome" my wife would call it.......

 

Not bifocal in the sense they don't have a line across the lens....some type of progressive I think.

 

They also have the auto-tint capability so serve as sun glasses and adjust the tint to the light level.

 

All very good in theory.

 

What I found in practice is that they are fine for the up close bit but for the long distance it feels like peeping through a letter box slot. There is something about them that just doesn't give me the natural long distance view I have without the glasses....somewhat distorted. I won't wear them during landings for example.

 

So, I am considering other options. Can't help thinking that the "even older old man" type of half-moon ones might not be better....you look down through the half lens but when you look up all you have is air between your eyes and that lovely view out through the windscreen.

 

 

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I use general sunglasses with a reading lens in the lower 1/3 (no correction for the rest). Check out the internet, there are quite a few suppliers of sunglasses that can have different corrections (from 0 to x) in the main lens and an added reading lens at the bottom.

 

As a trial, order some stick-on plastic lenses and put them on your normal sunglasses. You can also get safety glasses with the same reading lens built-in (from about 1.5 to 3.0)

 

 

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multifocal transition lenses with clip on sunglasses. Wear them all the time, no probs flying etc. Remember polaroid lenses can make it hard to read electronic screens hence the removable sunglasses.

 

 

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I wear multifocals and wouldn't use anything else. They take a few days to get used to but then you have full range focus. Before I became a full time glasses wearer (mid forties) I couldn't go outside without sunnies. Now I wear clear glasses I find I don't need tinting. Must be the UV coating.

 

I tried contacts but couldn't get used to them.

 

 

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They say it takes a while to get used to progressive.

 

I found them no problem and was used to them in a day.

 

I haven't used Bifocal, but would imagine you would have to tilt your head up or down more so you weren't looking through the lens joins.

 

Glad I went progressive rather than Bi-focal.

 

 

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I use bifocal sunnies (non-polarised) and had the reading part calibrated to panel distance. I also had them set the break line between the reading and distance parts so that it lies in my vision line just about where the bottom of the windscreen is. When I look down at the panel, it's in focus. When I shift my eyes up out of the cockpit, that's in focus too and my brain doesn't even register the transition from reading to distance.

 

 

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Hi All,

 

What I am going to say is what most people will already know who wear glasses.

 

When I first had trouble reading, liking most man, I raced out to get a $5 buck pair of magnifying glasses, problem solved.

 

But when I decided to get back into flying GA and RAAus, my short and long vision required professional correction.

 

I found an optometrist with some aviation experience and I got the following type glasses, multi-focal progressive lenses, with adaptive transition coating, with added protective lens coating and yep, it did cost a bit. The real stinger was that the GA medical, required me to have two pairs.

 

My optometrist took everything into a account from my nose bridge height, my eye to lens distances, my horizontal distance and vertical alignment for the lens position to my eyes, the right frame type and size, made the final adjustments to the frame so the lens position sat perfectly on me head every time I put my glasses on.

 

The progressive lenses tick all the boxes and I have found they are great to flying with during the day and night. The transition coating and tinting works for me in the cockpit, but then I have never been a sunglasses type pilot for glare.

 

The optometrist had a bit of stuffing around getting the lenses focal positioning right, the first pair had one lens better than the other, the next pair was pretty good, but not quite right for my night vision, but I persisted in getting it sorted and with a final change to another frame size and further final adjustments, all was perfect.

 

With my glasses I wear them all day, put them on in the morning and take them off at night. I could not go back to wearing glasses where you need to put them on

 

and take them off to see different things, especially when it comes to flying.

 

I hope this helps someone looking at glasses for the first time.

 

 

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Hi All,What I am going to say is what most people will already know who wear glasses.

 

When I first had trouble reading, liking most man, I raced out to get a $5 buck pair of magnifying glasses, problem solved.

Just make sure they are skinny ones that you can wear way down your nose .... or go to Zenni Optical and buy a set of prescription glasses with zero on the top and whatever you need at the bottom. If you are doing that you might as well have an eye test and get "real" ones from Zenni. Bifocal or progressive - take your pick. Expect to pay about USD50 for bifocals or USD 100 for progressives. Then get some of their $US5 clipon polarised sunnies. Cut the bottom off with some snippers so you can look at the panel .... works

 

 

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Hi k74.

 

When younger and first need short vision assistance I chose half frame glasses and loved them. Excellent for flying.

 

As I aged and needed long vision correction as well I changed to bi-vocals and am happy with them.

 

Re some of the comments above:

 

Yes you do have to tilt your head but this becomes an automated response and ceases to be an issue.

 

Progressive lenses seemed to restrict the peripheral vision somewhat, don’ t think it was imagination.

 

Lens coatings, according to my optometrist have a uv reflective capacity close to most sunglasses but does little for glare, which does not bother me.

 

Whichever you chose, be patient and careful. They will take time to become accustomed to.

 

Bob.

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
Hi All,When I first had trouble reading, liking most man, I raced out to get a $5 buck pair of magnifying glasses, problem solved.

Sorry, with that quote,

 

I was taking the micky out of us Aussie males who think a $5.00 pair of magnifying glasses and can solved our eye sight problems, including me.

 

Please think again and see an optometrist, I finally learnt and found the money was well spent and worth it.

 

 

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I use graduated multifocals with transitions lenses. I wear them full time and have no problems with flying, driving or bright sunlight. The only problem I ever had was walking down stairs, actually have to look down, ie tilt my head, rather than just casting my eyes down.

 

 

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