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Hello people, i,m in the process of bringing back on line a GT 500 which has been hanger stored wings off since 2009. I will conduct fabric test of lift and control surfaces befor any flying is carried out, so i,m asking if their is any forum members who own and would rent a fabric tester for the purpose to save me having to buy one for this single use only, my mobile is 0414607563 if anyone can advise and/or assist I would be most greatfull, cheers Hargraves Mick

 

 

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Some interesting videos regarding fabric tension/condition. Well worth watching

 

Here's the link to the Quicksilver supplier www.air-techinc.com ($US57)

 

Comparing the Maule Fabric Tester to the Quicksilver one, I prefer the latter because the presence of the indicating O-ring would make it easier to calibrate the graduated inner rod. Although a simple calibration test to locate the critical point (10 lbs or 4.5 Kg) would provide a pass/fail mark on the rod.

 

 

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Or you could spring for the purchase yourself, then rent out yous in the future.

 

Perhaps after people have had a look at those videos, they might start thinking about the tensile strength of the fabric on their own aircraft.

 

 

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Hargraves - There are companies who possess Bettsometers for fabric testing, that would probably be willing to test your fabric for you - the only problem I see then, is the cost and effort of transporting your wings to them.

 

Caboolture Microlights: Recreational aircraft maintenance and servicing

 

Or - you could manufacture your own Bettsometer, as these microlight blokes are suggesting.

 

Microlight Forum Articles help and information for microlight pilots - DIY Bettsometer

 

 

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IF the condition of the fabric is such that if it was tested with a Maule or the Quicksilver type tester and passed the test,

 

THEN the fabric would not suffer any damage as a result of the test (Non-Destructive Testing).

 

HOWEVER the mere conduct of the test using a Bettsometer results in damage to the fabric as a hook has to be put through the fabric in order to attach the Bettsometer. The damage might be only a small pinhole at the time of the test, but from a tiny acorn, a mighty oak can grow.

 

 

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IF the condition of the fabric is such that if it was tested with a Maule or the Quicksilver type tester and passed the test,THEN the fabric would not suffer any damage as a result of the test (Non-Destructive Testing).

HOWEVER the mere conduct of the test using a Bettsometer results in damage to the fabric as a hook has to be put through the fabric in order to attach the Bettsometer. The damage might be only a small pinhole at the time of the test, but from a tiny acorn, a mighty oak can grow.

Needle goes through the fabric; just like the stitching holes (therefore no issue good fabric) your testing for tear-ability etc. The hook is for the stitching strength test.

 

Cheers Mike

 

 

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All good help thanks guys, i,ll hold out for the quicksilver manufacturers tool either brought or hired eh

Stop the clock! Over the weekend the missing Bettsometer ceased to be missing and there was no-one (including myself) who deserved a beating for it's disappearance. Either PM or call me with your address details and I'll get in the mail to you tomorrow. Same deal as original offer, you pay postage both ways and either sacrifice your family jewels or replace it should it go missing. cheers.

 

 

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Great news Bob thanks mate i,ll ring you tomorrow with details, cheers Mick

Bettsometer in the post to you this morning. Rcpt # 600 34770385 090 cheers

 

 

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  • 2 years later...

Some interesting videos regarding fabric tension/condition. Well worth watching

 

Here's the link to the Quicksilver supplier www.air-techinc.com ($US57)

 

Comparing the Maule Fabric Tester to the Quicksilver one, I prefer the latter because the presence of the indicating O-ring would make it easier to calibrate the graduated inner rod. Although a simple calibration test to locate the critical point (10 lbs or 4.5 Kg) would provide a pass/fail mark on the rod.

That’s a great video. Found it because I’m playing with the idea of a quicksilver float plane for USA. Can land at field near our South Dakota house then fly out to pontoon boat my in-laws will be on Missouri River/ Lake Andes.

 

I flew with this fabric (not saying where and when) and became a bit relaxed about it. The video says otherwise. Maybe this is a different fabric. Seems a stronger weave than the test video.

 

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I flew with this fabric

 

The fabric itself might be OK after that tear is patched, but the amount of dirt along the stitch seam suggests that it was a long time ago that the covering job was new. I'd be concerned about the strength of the stitches.

 

As Alice Cooper said in Unfinished Sweet: "The teeth are OK, but the gums gotta go!"

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  • 1 month later...

Needle goes through the fabric; just like the stitching holes (therefore no issue good fabric) your testing for tear-ability etc. The hook is for the stitching strength test.

 

Cheers Mike

Some info that may be of assistance. Annual Bettsometer test (For Skyrangers) is to be carried out as follows: ‘Dacron’ fabric: to 1000 grammes / 1.2mm needle with wing sails fitted and tensioned to flight. Test must be to both upper and lower surfaces. Stitching to be tested to 1360 grammes / 1.2mm needle. ‘Porcher Marine’ fabric: to 1360 grammes / 1.2mm needle with wing sails fitted and tensioned to flight. Test must be to both upper and lower surfaces and stitching. BRITISH MICROLIGHT AIRCRAFT ASSOCIATION HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT DATA SHEET (HADS) NO: HM4 ISSUE: 18

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I appreciate that in this example glue/adhesive integrity may not be a factor BUT just in case it is -

 

I have an aircraft with partial fabric wings & control surfaces. The fabric is glued on (not a stitch in sight). When the aircraft was about 13 years old I became its new owner. She was looking a bit tacky - paint fade and cracking in places. I decided to do a refurbishment! - all new fabric & paint job.

 

Before removing the old fabric, I thought I would do a crude strength test. Using a Philips head screw driver, I stabbed with all my strength down on a wing section - dented but not holed! Great ! the fabric was holding up well in the Australian sun/UV.

 

Proceeded to remove fabric - very hard slow work with careful help from a heat gun - glues holding up very well!

 

My confidence in fabric & glue was on a steep climb.

 

That was until one of the ailerons - fabric came off with out any effort to speak of and no help from the heat gun. Skarrrrry!!!

 

No idea why one area had essentially failed glue - but very glad I found it on the ground.

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My confidence in fabric & glue was on a steep climb.

 

That was until one of the ailerons - fabric came off with out any effort to speak of and no help from the heat gun. Skarrrrry!!!

 

No idea why one area had essentially failed glue - but very glad I found it on the ground.

That’s save your arse type information. I was just reading it and thinking “Wow, that’s amazing the glue is so good. I’d have only been confident in stitch”

 

Great the fabric remained so strong (puncture proof). Seems like you need a pull test as well on all the glued surfaces. How you do that without weakening or beginning a small unglued section is difficult. Try to pull up and no is a pass. Hard pull up and glue back down?

 

I think I’ll keep looking into stiched fabric. Drifter, no idea how these are sorted. I’ll investigate.

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Arse. I just noticed you can’t write ar*e. Probably can’t write cunt or fuck either.

 

‘It’s like the tv show... The Good Place. Forking hell.

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That’s save your **** type information. I was just reading it and thinking “Wow, that’s amazing the glue is so good. I’d have only been confident in stitch”

 

Great the fabric remained so strong (puncture proof). Seems like you need a pull test as well on all the glued surfaces. How you do that without weakening or beginning a small unglued section is difficult. Try to pull up and no is a pass. Hard pull up and glue back down?

 

I think I’ll keep looking into stiched fabric. Drifter, no idea how these are sorted. I’ll investigate.

 

I refurbished the whole aircraft using the Aircraft Certified "Stewart Paint/Fabric System". I am confident that the work done and the materials used will last for a very long time indeed.

 

I also went over & above the original manufactures gluing system, by considerably increasing the glued surface area, and also overlapping (complete rap +) of control surfaces. The original factory system lasted 13 years. With my improvements & more technologically evolved adhesive, I would expect at least double this time if not longer.

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Hi Skippy, being a water based PU, I assume Stewart Systems paint / glue it is not regarded as Dangerous Goods? Were you able to import it direct via airfreight ?

Did you use an HVLP spray gun when applying it? Thanks, Bill

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