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Light sports plane down near Batchelor NT.


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You can deduct the windspeed from your stall speed when it's still flying and have virtually NO rate of descent.. The chute will also drag you in the water or on the ground with significant winds present. At low level it's not effective so an engine failure just after lift off or from late final.is not of assistance.

 

If a plane is inverted by a crosswind or too fast touchdown (wheelbarrowing) it's now a RISK to rescuers and the occupant(s) if it's armed at the time. Unreliable engines or engines being tested should be flown in suitable environmental conditions, not surrounded by houses and factories built right to the aerodrome boundary and you should be trained to anticipate an engine failure with a single as much as you do with multi engines or a failed glider tow rope etc.. A ballistic chute is a consideration not a magic fix for all situations. Nev

 

 

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If that's the case, why the problem with transporting them by air to have them recharged? Nev

Well may you ask, Nev. When my BRS arrived in the mail yonks ago, it caused an office evacuation, even though the parts were well padded and shipped in separate boxes.There's probably more danger in ordinary mixed freight, but the little word Rocket gets people excited.

 

When you send the parachute for repacking, BRS provided labels in BIG LETTERS to assure freight and postal authorities that nothing dangerous is included.

 

 

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Shirley the 'hard rubber disks discs' don't have energy ?

Ashley they do, they are compressed and store the energy. A spring is a spring, metal or rubber.

 

A ballistic chute is a consideration not a magic fix for all situations. Nev

Every time the subject comes up you desperately argue against them.

There is no magic that's going to save you over tiger terrain, there is no magic that's going to stop you from a flat spin, 2 of which have already killed 4 people in Australia this year.

 

Those 4 people were flying in the very latest in tech certified aircraft, and had certified teaching pilots in both, yet they are dead against your constant proffering that "well trained Pilots in well maintained aircraft" will save the day. And they were flying over good clear ground.

 

How many other fatal accidents just this year alone would you like exampled where a chute would have save lives.

 

once you pull the handle you've lost control - "Yeah, but compared to what?"

Well of course "Real Men" walk out on the wing and fix the motor themselves.

Apparently.

 

1970747803_enginestartfromwing.jpg.d371e6cc9347c9af76c43a6cd3271d5f.jpg

 

 

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Wow, good work in getting a brilliant result from a Murphy's Moment - a couple of questions:

 

1. if you had not been restricted on altitude by the G step-down, would it have made any difference?

 

2. if it was obvious you were not going to make the clearing, what were your options?

 

sorry about the second question but I'm sure you would have thought about that since 'the incident' anyway - probably during it....

 

PS pity about that damn clearing being a bog - if it was dry you were home and hosed m8..

 

BP

 

 

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This was me. It happened yesterday. I’ve often seen these type of reports and wondered what lay behind the hype and the sensation. I’ve tried to keep and open mind but now I I think I better understand the forces at play.My incident was all over the media, especially here in The Territory. My wife and I were described as an ‘elderly couple’ who had astonishing luck to survive after undefined engine problems... Yep, we were called ‘survivors’ of a crash, with the image of our inverted plane all over the media.

I couldn’t really explain to my non-flying colleagues at work, but I want to run over what happened and how I feel about it here, in the hope that somebody will either learn from it or perhaps relate to how deflated I’m feeling. My wife is just plain cranky at being described as being aged ‘in her fifties’ by the media, a complete fallacy. 008_roflmao.gif.1403968ae51b10bfcd4c01d7b660b53c.gif.

 

Here’s what happened.

 

We were flying back from Crab Claw to Batchelor at about 2000 feet because we had just come out from under the 2500 ft step into G class airspace. That’s much lower than I would normally fly over bush but I had just given a 10 mile inbound and we could see home. The aircraft had been flying for over an hour and had already taken off twice that day. All indications were normal, and the motor was running fine but suddenly it seized. The prop jerked to a stop, and we were whistling through the air in silence, a fat barrel-shaped glider. Aviate, Navigate, Communicate, I trimmed for best glide. Had a glance around and then called ‘Pan’ on the Batchelor frequency, describing my engine failure and location. I tried to prime with the fuel pump and restart but something told me the engine was completely broke. Most concerning, we were over extensive woodlands and hilly terrain, no roads or anywhere to set down. But we always lookout for places to set down as we fly, and we had already discussed a couple of spots earlier during the flight.

 

Together my wife and I spotted a small clearing a couple miles away, to the north but it looked awfully far. I trimmed to stretch the glide as best I could, keeping an eye on the ASI knowing that 50-60 would give me my best chance. I gave a radio call of where we were heading. My wife’s instructor was somewhere around doing training and called back that the message had been relayed to Brisbane Central. We also heard a couple of other voices responding and relaying our message. Oddly enough that was really reassuring to know that our situation was known, not that it was much help for our immediate predicament. Dunno how long that glide lasted, in my perception it went on and on, reluctantly trading height for speed to stay away from stall. We just made it over the edge of the clearing and as I got over the last of the trees I put out extra flap and floated down to make probably my best landing that day, but into shoulder high spear grass. That grass slowed us down pretty quick, but as we decelerated on our landing roll our wheels started sinking into the bog. And we pitched forward, not at high speed, but enough to flip the aircraft onto its back.

 

The roll happened quite suddenly and was quite diseorientating, but my ‘elderly’ wife proved remarkably spritely and called “right, everybody out!” We scrambled out of the aircraft into the bog. We were shaken, but we were otherwise unhurt.

 

An R44 tourist flight was overhead in about ten minutes as we were trying to ascertain our damage and how we might get out of the swamp. The pilot landed and told us help was on the way and he would return after his tourists were unloaded. Top bloke! But within 30 minutes the CareFlight guys arrived from Darwin and extracted us, the pilot being very careful not to set down in the bog. They were fabulous, and really pragmatic about the incident. They ferried us back to Batchelor where they checked us out, I spoke with AMSA and gave a report to the Cops. We drove home that night still rather bemused by the whole experience. But our confusion was nothing to what we experienced this morning seeing our story all over the media this morning with it’s bizarre inaccuraries and sensationalism.

 

So tonight our beautiful aircraft lies inverted in a swamp and we’re waiting to hear from our insurers. Yes we are lucky, but we worked as a team and flew the plane to the ground a long distance without power. My wife who is undergoing flight training herself was calm and reassuring, and her amazing competence was infectious. She made me a better pilot. This sounds crazy, but I’m so glad she was with me through it. Shes gonna make an awesome aviator.

 

In 13 years flying, I’ve had an emergency landing before, but in the circuit, where it’s fairly clear what to do. This was different.

 

So why did the engine seize? Had I preflighted and pulled through the prop on the radial and managed the oil? Yes I had, but unfortunately on these radials it’s possible a bent rod could go undetected for weeks or months before it cuts loose. It’s really hard to tell without opening the engine and I had no reason to suspect that anything was amiss. The aircraft follows a regular maintenance schedule to GA standards. When we get the aircraft back it’ll be interesting to see what happened.

 

This can happen to anybody, quite unexpectedly. You never think it’s gonna happen to you. Walking away from this was testimony to some great instruction and sound advice I’ve received over the years. I hope I never have to apply that knowledge again.

Well done NT5224 ( and passenger) - not only did you Aviate as required but most importantly you shared your experience with all us other pilots. Aircraft looks to be still in good shape so hope you get it back in the air soon.Regards

 

Ian

 

 

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Main reasons I would use a BRS system if installed.

 

With an engine failure and a REASONABLE landing field around I would attempt to land the aircraft. I would hopefully!!!! expect less damage to the aircraft and salvage it.

 

Remember - by pulling the pin you can basically call the aircraft written off.

 

1. Medical Problem (if carrying pax please also briefed what to do if you are unconscious to pull the pin) or you are able to pull the pin yourself.

 

2. Structural or control failure

 

3. Into cloud - losing control of aircraft

 

4. Flying over tiger country (bad person) with engine failure and only option is landing on top of trees

 

5. Takeoff from some hairy bush strips with trees, hills - engine fails at the worst time say 300ft - nowhere to go

 

And

 

5. If the pilot is not confident of putting the plane down during a failure and also has concern for pax life injury - as usually the passenger (not your wife ) do not understand the real risk of flying small RAA or GA aircraft and or the pilot has limited experience and taking friends for a run to reduce injury or death.

 

However the best way not to pull the pin is always have a place while flying to put down, as you should have been taught - Do you really trust ROTAX?

 

 

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This was me. It happened yesterday. I’ve often seen these type of reports and wondered what lay behind the hype and the sensation. I’ve tried to keep and open mind but now I I think I better understand the forces at play.My incident was all over the media, especially here in The Territory. My wife and I were described as an ‘elderly couple’ who had astonishing luck to survive after undefined engine problems... Yep, we were called ‘survivors’ of a crash, with the image of our inverted plane all over the media.

I couldn’t really explain to my non-flying colleagues at work, but I want to run over what happened and how I feel about it here, in the hope that somebody will either learn from it or perhaps relate to how deflated I’m feeling. My wife is just plain cranky at being described as being aged ‘in her fifties’ by the media, a complete fallacy. 008_roflmao.gif.1403968ae51b10bfcd4c01d7b660b53c.gif.

 

Here’s what happened.

 

We were flying back from Crab Claw to Batchelor at about 2000 feet because we had just come out from under the 2500 ft step into G class airspace. That’s much lower than I would normally fly over bush but I had just given a 10 mile inbound and we could see home. The aircraft had been flying for over an hour and had already taken off twice that day. All indications were normal, and the motor was running fine but suddenly it seized. The prop jerked to a stop, and we were whistling through the air in silence, a fat barrel-shaped glider. Aviate, Navigate, Communicate, I trimmed for best glide. Had a glance around and then called ‘Pan’ on the Batchelor frequency, describing my engine failure and location. I tried to prime with the fuel pump and restart but something told me the engine was completely broke. Most concerning, we were over extensive woodlands and hilly terrain, no roads or anywhere to set down. But we always lookout for places to set down as we fly, and we had already discussed a couple of spots earlier during the flight.

 

Together my wife and I spotted a small clearing a couple miles away, to the north but it looked awfully far. I trimmed to stretch the glide as best I could, keeping an eye on the ASI knowing that 50-60 would give me my best chance. I gave a radio call of where we were heading. My wife’s instructor was somewhere around doing training and called back that the message had been relayed to Brisbane Central. We also heard a couple of other voices responding and relaying our message. Oddly enough that was really reassuring to know that our situation was known, not that it was much help for our immediate predicament. Dunno how long that glide lasted, in my perception it went on and on, reluctantly trading height for speed to stay away from stall. We just made it over the edge of the clearing and as I got over the last of the trees I put out extra flap and floated down to make probably my best landing that day, but into shoulder high spear grass. That grass slowed us down pretty quick, but as we decelerated on our landing roll our wheels started sinking into the bog. And we pitched forward, not at high speed, but enough to flip the aircraft onto its back.

 

The roll happened quite suddenly and was quite diseorientating, but my ‘elderly’ wife proved remarkably spritely and called “right, everybody out!” We scrambled out of the aircraft into the bog. We were shaken, but we were otherwise unhurt.

 

An R44 tourist flight was overhead in about ten minutes as we were trying to ascertain our damage and how we might get out of the swamp. The pilot landed and told us help was on the way and he would return after his tourists were unloaded. Top bloke! But within 30 minutes the CareFlight guys arrived from Darwin and extracted us, the pilot being very careful not to set down in the bog. They were fabulous, and really pragmatic about the incident. They ferried us back to Batchelor where they checked us out, I spoke with AMSA and gave a report to the Cops. We drove home that night still rather bemused by the whole experience. But our confusion was nothing to what we experienced this morning seeing our story all over the media this morning with it’s bizarre inaccuraries and sensationalism.

 

So tonight our beautiful aircraft lies inverted in a swamp and we’re waiting to hear from our insurers. Yes we are lucky, but we worked as a team and flew the plane to the ground a long distance without power. My wife who is undergoing flight training herself was calm and reassuring, and her amazing competence was infectious. She made me a better pilot. This sounds crazy, but I’m so glad she was with me through it. Shes gonna make an awesome aviator.

 

In 13 years flying, I’ve had an emergency landing before, but in the circuit, where it’s fairly clear what to do. This was different.

 

So why did the engine seize? Had I preflighted and pulled through the prop on the radial and managed the oil? Yes I had, but unfortunately on these radials it’s possible a bent rod could go undetected for weeks or months before it cuts loose. It’s really hard to tell without opening the engine and I had no reason to suspect that anything was amiss. The aircraft follows a regular maintenance schedule to GA standards. When we get the aircraft back it’ll be interesting to see what happened.

 

This can happen to anybody, quite unexpectedly. You never think it’s gonna happen to you. Walking away from this was testimony to some great instruction and sound advice I’ve received over the years. I hope I never have to apply that knowledge again.

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I hope you don't mind the thread drifting a bit from your own (thankfully successful) forced landing, NT. (A really useful - discussion starting - report for all of us!)

 

But this oldie-but-goodie in the 'Saves' catalogue shows well, among other things, that final (and audible ;-) ouch! moment.

 

 

Anyway, I, for one, can never get enough of those Mayday calls.

 

 

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Bex , I don't "desperately" argue anything. I hope I put up valid considerations.. Sellers of these things are not likely to put out any adverse considerations. are they. I don't want to see them made compulsory. 25 kgs is a lot of weight and some planes cannot fit them. It's a not insignificant cost to fit and renew it's validity. Re the particular RANS plane that folded a wing I wouldn't aerobat one of those without a chute as they are a known easy to overstress, plane. Any test flying of a major structural or flying peculiarity nature, I recommend a chute.. Flying over timbered steep country or tall buildings I doubt you could guarantee an injury free experience and I would prefer to see such situations avoided rather than see the chute as a fix..

 

If the structure is sound and flyable I would fly it rather than commit to a free fall at 1200 fpm plus generally with no real control It's not in any way a steerable situation... If you fly in or above 8/8 cloud you would be better to learn how or avoid losing control, rather than see it as a solution to a situation you shouldn't have gotten into unprepared . An inflight collision with a cable or another plane may result in serious injury or death in any case. due to the forces involved.. I don't want to stop or impede anyone going down this path, but there seems to be developing a view that IF you don't have one you are somehow negligent. IF a 172 hits a B727 midair most likely everyone on the B727 and the 172 will die. Doing your best to avoid mid airs is a worthwhile aim, as they aren't often survivable.. Nev

 

 

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This was me. It happened yesterday. I’ve often seen these type of reports and wondered what lay behind the hype and the sensation. I’ve tried to keep and open mind but now I I think I better understand the forces at play.My incident was all over the media, especially here in The Territory. My wife and I were described as an ‘elderly couple’ who had astonishing luck to survive after undefined engine problems... Yep, we were called ‘survivors’ of a crash, with the image of our inverted plane all over the media.

I couldn’t really explain to my non-flying colleagues at work, but I want to run over what happened and how I feel about it here, in the hope that somebody will either learn from it or perhaps relate to how deflated I’m feeling. My wife is just plain cranky at being described as being aged ‘in her fifties’ by the media, a complete fallacy. 008_roflmao.gif.1403968ae51b10bfcd4c01d7b660b53c.gif.

 

Here’s what happened.

 

We were flying back from Crab Claw to Batchelor at about 2000 feet because we had just come out from under the 2500 ft step into G class airspace. That’s much lower than I would normally fly over bush but I had just given a 10 mile inbound and we could see home. The aircraft had been flying for over an hour and had already taken off twice that day. All indications were normal, and the motor was running fine but suddenly it seized. The prop jerked to a stop, and we were whistling through the air in silence, a fat barrel-shaped glider. Aviate, Navigate, Communicate, I trimmed for best glide. Had a glance around and then called ‘Pan’ on the Batchelor frequency, describing my engine failure and location. I tried to prime with the fuel pump and restart but something told me the engine was completely broke. Most concerning, we were over extensive woodlands and hilly terrain, no roads or anywhere to set down. But we always lookout for places to set down as we fly, and we had already discussed a couple of spots earlier during the flight.

 

Together my wife and I spotted a small clearing a couple miles away, to the north but it looked awfully far. I trimmed to stretch the glide as best I could, keeping an eye on the ASI knowing that 50-60 would give me my best chance. I gave a radio call of where we were heading. My wife’s instructor was somewhere around doing training and called back that the message had been relayed to Brisbane Central. We also heard a couple of other voices responding and relaying our message. Oddly enough that was really reassuring to know that our situation was known, not that it was much help for our immediate predicament. Dunno how long that glide lasted, in my perception it went on and on, reluctantly trading height for speed to stay away from stall. We just made it over the edge of the clearing and as I got over the last of the trees I put out extra flap and floated down to make probably my best landing that day, but into shoulder high spear grass. That grass slowed us down pretty quick, but as we decelerated on our landing roll our wheels started sinking into the bog. And we pitched forward, not at high speed, but enough to flip the aircraft onto its back.

 

The roll happened quite suddenly and was quite diseorientating, but my ‘elderly’ wife proved remarkably spritely and called “right, everybody out!” We scrambled out of the aircraft into the bog. We were shaken, but we were otherwise unhurt.

 

An R44 tourist flight was overhead in about ten minutes as we were trying to ascertain our damage and how we might get out of the swamp. The pilot landed and told us help was on the way and he would return after his tourists were unloaded. Top bloke! But within 30 minutes the CareFlight guys arrived from Darwin and extracted us, the pilot being very careful not to set down in the bog. They were fabulous, and really pragmatic about the incident. They ferried us back to Batchelor where they checked us out, I spoke with AMSA and gave a report to the Cops. We drove home that night still rather bemused by the whole experience. But our confusion was nothing to what we experienced this morning seeing our story all over the media this morning with it’s bizarre inaccuraries and sensationalism.

 

So tonight our beautiful aircraft lies inverted in a swamp and we’re waiting to hear from our insurers. Yes we are lucky, but we worked as a team and flew the plane to the ground a long distance without power. My wife who is undergoing flight training herself was calm and reassuring, and her amazing competence was infectious. She made me a better pilot. This sounds crazy, but I’m so glad she was with me through it. Shes gonna make an awesome aviator.

 

In 13 years flying, I’ve had an emergency landing before, but in the circuit, where it’s fairly clear what to do. This was different.

 

So why did the engine seize? Had I preflighted and pulled through the prop on the radial and managed the oil? Yes I had, but unfortunately on these radials it’s possible a bent rod could go undetected for weeks or months before it cuts loose. It’s really hard to tell without opening the engine and I had no reason to suspect that anything was amiss. The aircraft follows a regular maintenance schedule to GA standards. When we get the aircraft back it’ll be interesting to see what happened.

 

This can happen to anybody, quite unexpectedly. You never think it’s gonna happen to you. Walking away from this was testimony to some great instruction and sound advice I’ve received over the years. I hope I never have to apply that knowledge again.

Hi everybody.Thanks so much for the comments of support and encouragement. That's what you get sharing your story with other aviators rather than non-flyers.

What frustrated me yesterday was the local media reporting of our spectacular 'crash'. A local radio channel apparently reported that we had miraculously survived (and I didn't hear this myself) when the aircraft had fallen from the sky or flown into the ground inverted, as shown in the picture! Of course the flip had only occurred at low speed when the wheels stuck in mud at the end of the landing roll. Understandably, we had relatives seriously worried for our lives... Also we were reported to have 'injuries' or 'minor' injuries. We were both unharmed by the incident and I just drove us home after the misadventure. Its unfair how our sport is tarnished by this sensationalism.

 

Anyway gripe over.

 

On the issue of STOL raised by nicephotog, I'd consider my own Murphy Rebel a serious STOL bush aircraft, designed and built for the Canadian outback. Funnily enough, I currently have on order some 29 inch Alaskan bush tyres to be fitted to it. If they had arrived and been fitted before Sunday they almost certainly would have prevented my rollover on landing. However, they weigh 15kg each and if they had been fitted its likely the weight and drag would have compromised that lengthy glide to the clearing we pulled off. We might have dropped into the bush. I'd rather take the roll-over than fly my wife into trees.

 

Have been in touch with the insurers and plans are afoot for the recovery. Its going to be a bit of an adventure getting to the landing site at this time of year and getting the aircraft out.

 

Cheers

 

Alan

Forget what the rest say, you cant explain the feeling when the fan stops, we are all trained the same ,its how you handle it ,I bet you and your bride look at each other in a way that very few can,it takes something special inside to get it down,i know the feeling RE my name
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Bex , I don't "desperately" argue anything. I hope I put up valid considerations.. Sellers of these things are not likely to put out any adverse considerations. are they. I don't want to see them made compulsory. 25 kgs is a lot of weight and some planes cannot fit them. It's a not insignificant cost to fit and renew it's validity. Re the particular RANS plane that folded a wing I wouldn't aerobat one of those without a chute as they are a known easy to overstress, plane. Any test flying of a major structural or flying peculiarity nature, I recommend a chute.. Flying over timbered steep country or tall buildings I doubt you could guarantee an injury free experience and I would prefer to see such situations avoided rather than see the chute as a fix..If the structure is sound and flyable I would fly it rather than commit to a free fall at 1200 fpm plus generally with no real control It's not in any way a steerable situation... If you fly in or above 8/8 cloud you would be better to learn how or avoid losing control, rather than see it as a solution to a situation you shouldn't have gotten into unprepared . An inflight collision with a cable or another plane may result in serious injury or death in any case. due to the forces involved.. I don't want to stop or impede anyone going down this path, but there seems to be developing a view that IF you don't have one you are somehow negligent. IF a 172 hits a B727 midair most likely everyone on the B727 and the 172 will die. Doing your best to avoid mid airs is a worthwhile aim, as they aren't often survivable.. Nev

Bex's sudden interest in promoting BRS to such an extent has me thinking that making/selling them is probably his latest scheme. I can't think why else, since he doesn't fly himself ...

 

 

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Ashley they do, they are compressed and store the energy. A spring is a spring, metal or rubber...

True, but that's a different sort of energy being stored...My undercarriage legs are filled with rubber blocks to absorb landing shocks, but the rubber disks in BRS rocket motors actually burn- very fast- so that's using stored chemical energy.

 

Lots of different fuels can be used to power a rocket. In my youth I launched rockets filled with aluminium powder and zinc dust, amongst other things.

 

I guess the synthetic rubber discs being used have a long shelf life, are stable and not easily ignited, and produce mobs of thrust in a short amount of time.

 

 

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I hope you don't mind the thread drifting a bit from your own (thankfully successful) forced landing, NT. (A really useful - discussion starting - report for all of us!)But this oldie-but-goodie in the 'Saves' catalogue shows well, among other things, that final (and audible ;-) ouch! moment.

Anyway, I, for one, can never get enough of those Mayday calls.

Can someone point out just why this guy pulled his chute? As far as I could see he had a near miss, or did they actually collide?
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Hi NT5224,

 

Commisserations for the plight of the plane, but congratulations to you and your wife. You did everything to get the two of you down as safely as possible. I have had three incidents in my 8x years - one, my mistake in which I chose a too short runway and ploughed through a fence, the other two were Alternator failures with loss of electronics including flaps, and comms. The first was embarrassing but my wife and I survived - and I learnt a lot, the other two I stuck to "Aviate, Navigate, Communicate" and did a perfect flapless landing on an airport with a decent length runway. As you now know - getting down safely is the goal.

 

I'm sure you will spend a lot of time going over what happened, but I hope the insurance payout allows you to get a new machine and get back in the air. If there is one thing I would respectfully suggest - it is get back in the air soon - with an instructor - to both practise engine failures, and to maintain confidence.

 

I wish you and your wife the best.

 

Brett

 

 

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Can someone point out just why this guy pulled his chute? As far as I could see he had a near miss, or did they actually collide?

Tow cable disabled the plane.
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yeah if you listen to the video you can hear the impact of his aircraft and the tow cable - really nasty accident, all three pilots were lucky to walk away from that

 

when I practice engine failure drills (about every third flight or so) I try to do it by just pulling the throttle as soon as the idea goes through my head, not when I think "this is a nice place for an engine failure drill"

 

on the way down I say the call out loud "mayday mayday Drifter 0455 engine failure six miles North of Boonah"...just gotta remember to keep my thumb off the transmit button !!!

 

the only thing I do that makes it a little less realistic is that I choose a paddock away from houses and animals, then I go down to around 20 feet or so to make sure my approach is spot on

 

one other thing I do is to blip the throttle a few times to avoid shock cooling - no point in turning the practice engine failure drill into a real one !!!!!

 

gotta admit I haven't done many at take-off, and that's where a lot of them happen - I'll sort that out when I get 0455 back in the air - not long now, just a few minor tasks to do

 

BP

 

 

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“Elderly” is just a matter of perspective, about 6 years ago whilst in Dunedin NZ it was revealed to me that at the age of 53 I was an “old c...” At first I was insulted but on reflection I decided to take it on as a badge of honour, I had made it there while the young fellow who all but flew out of the back window of the car he was in, as he let me know of my new found status may not have seen 20 if his particular behaviour continued as it was.

 

Elderly, no, experienced! and that is exactly what was required in your particular circumstances recently, so congratulations on walking away from your incident and thank you for such an interesting report of the CORRECT details, it made for really interesting reading and was good to have a first hand report of the incident. All the best for your future flying as a husband / wife team, seems like the biggest hurdle has been well and truly cleared together.

 

Ross

 

 

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I agree wholeheartedly with the comments made here about the importance of this incident in relation to the development of the flight crew - good old CRM...

 

You are going to have the best possible crew member sitting alongside you and there is no doubt in my mind that this has strengthened that relationship, both in the air and on the ground

 

Many (dare I say it - ok, female, there, I did it...) crew members would have walked away from aviation after such a scare and you would not have blamed them one bit

 

As Ducky says in all his posts - Clear Skies and Tail Winds to you pair - oh yeah, and a moving propellor would be nice......

 

BP

 

 

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