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Some good news from RAAus


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Was that a Jabiru engine course? Id like to do one, could you tell us more please.

I do highly recommend the course.

How Jason gives his knowledge, is a no fuss format. """""""""""""""""It is an Australian engine.""""""""""""""""""""""""".

 

The extra knowledge one gets out of attending clearly demonstrates what we do not know. What hit home for me is all the misinformation which is out in aviation land.

 

The persons who espouse this knowledge and they think they are the experts, people are taking this stuff as gospel and it is far from the truth, and these people are in positions where innocents listen to them. (Do not doubt these espousers or you will get a tongue lashing).

 

Go along Bruce you will not regret it.

 

KP

 

 

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It is entirely in the hand of our pilots and instructors

How true! The teaching of real safety begins before the prospective student walks out to the aircraft to begin their TIF. The Board are seriously deluded if they believe that they are major contributors to flying safety in RAAus. Some effort toward actually helping flying schools with a no-bullsh video on flying safety, backed up by well thought out 'safety' cards for students, pilots and aircraft might ease our scepticism about HO 'safety' efforts. Until then, it's, once again, those at the coalface who are instilling common-sense safety in new pilots.

 

happy days,

 

 

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There's some value in beginning to instill safety in a tyro pilot before they leave the flight hut.

 

They are entering a new environment where there are dangers that have not been pointed out to them. Things like - don't lean on a propeller; always attach an earth strap to the plane before refuelling; watch out for things hanging under the wings (pitot tubes), and stop if your hear "Clear Prop".

 

 

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There's some value in beginning to instill safety in a tyro pilot before they leave the flight hut.They are entering a new environment where there are dangers that have not been pointed out to them. Things like - don't lean on a propeller; always attach an earth strap to the plane before refuelling; watch out for things hanging under the wings (pitot tubes), and stop if your hear "Clear Prop".

Not like the dork who posted photos off his kids draped over the props.

 

 

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While a factory engine course is a good idea, why isn't this published on line? Most of us can read and having the factory "bible" on line would dispel a lot of misinformation out there. When some "expert" is spouting off with rubbish, just refer him to the Jab website.

 

 

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Jabiru do great written stuff. Easily the best in the world. But there is no substitute for a hands on course done properly.

 

You just can't anticipate all the things people will do wrongly, but you can see and correct in a hands on situation.

 

 

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Isn't the new L1 qualification better than the old one...….which would be nothing?

 

Pretty easy to find personal views, myths some poor practice in Jabiru literature too but generally it is put together well.

 

Course would be good

 

 

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Jabiru do great written stuff. Easily the best in the world. But there is no substitute for a hands on course done properly.You just can't anticipate all the things people will do wrongly, but you can see and correct in a hands on situation.

So add some youtube links showing the actual procedure. Combined with the written stuff that would be pretty good and receive wider distribution than factory hands on be physically present courses at significant expense in time and money.

 

 

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While a factory engine course is a good idea, why isn't this published on line? Most of us can read and having the factory "bible" on line would dispel a lot of misinformation out there. When some "expert" is spouting off with rubbish, just refer him to the Jab website.

The engine settings are in the appropriate sections and it is relatively easy to navigate to the location. One must understand what is meant by the descriptions so to avoid doubt go along to a work shop.

As I do believe the only way is a hands on work shop as we have to be sure how people are interpreting the information.

 

Visual verification is impetrative to have the correct interpretation. The hydraulic lifters need a hands on approach to know what is going on.

 

Just to recap I believe one must go along to the engine course instead of something on the internet.

 

KP.

 

 

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Not like the dork who posted photos off his kids draped over the props.

One of my pet hates!!

A very recent RAAus post on bookface has a young guy holding the prop tip of a Jabiru he soloed in. Why hold, lean on or stand close to a propellor?

 

Im not scared of props, I’ve hand started many hundreds of times in my career and my current aeroplane isn’t fitted with a starter. I treat props with the respect they deserve.

 

 

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Agree but Jabiru props are safer than most, Might cause complacency for other types?

Nowhere in the propeller arc is "safe". Propellers are like fire - a good servant, but a bad master.

 

 

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One of my pet hates!!A very recent RAAus post on bookface has a young guy holding the prop tip of a Jabiru he soloed in. Why hold, lean on or stand close to a propellor?

Im not scared of props, I’ve hand started many hundreds of times in my career and my current aeroplane isn’t fitted with a starter. I treat props with the respect they deserve.

Yep a good set of systems and procedures is needed for prop work.

Not just "Safety" it tell us nothing........ "How are you going to perform the task with out a dangerous occurrence?".....Is the culture we have to develop.

 

We have to perform prop work, can not be ignored.

 

KP

 

 

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yes what did that online course do when you could have all the book answers beside you

 

I got 85 % no books just done it to see how I would go just clicked on it did it cold turkey and I got a tick off approval it was a bloody disaster

 

now I do have HARD copies of all the books that were needed had I taken my time to look up what the question want to know would have got 100%

 

now that would be lying to my self and others as I am not that smart with a 100%

 

when as keith and frank pointed out hands on and being shown is a mutch safer way for raa not to recommend this or recognize this is shows you that they are off smoking dope with elon musk

 

neil

 

 

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Yep a good set of systems and procedures is needed for prop work.Not just "Safety" it tell us nothing........ "How are you going to perform the task with out a dangerous occurrence?".....Is the culture we have to develop.

We have to perform prop work, can not be ignored.

 

KP

Totally agree. My dad taught me to handstart and he learnt to fly in Tigers, Austers and Chippies, which weren’t fitted with starter motors. Pretty rigid and standard procedures for handstarting, the person swinging the prop is in charge. RAAF notes for the Tiger seem to have the procedure well set out, which is what I use.

 

 

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I have now done the L1 theory, L1 practical and for my own peace of mind completed the jab factory maintenance course. It was well worth the effort to attend. As a former lecturer in both theory and practice (30 years) I must say that they know how to conduct a course. Now it is 4 days, for more fault finding over the 3 day course. The L1 practical was worth the time as it covered techniques that were not covered at Bundaberg, proper log book entry, lock wiring, torque settings, prop installation/tracking, brake pad and wheel bearing inspection, proper oil filter inspection amongst other topics. Ours was a beta course and we all gave feedback so the course is still evolving. Ken

 

 

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The Jabiru does not have an impulse starter, so it is much safer to turn over by hand to feel the engine compressions.

 

Once a Jabiru had an engine-out forced landing, and I later asked the pilot " what did the engine feel like on turnover that morning?"

 

He had never heard of this turnover test, and I figured out that he had been taught by instructors who had themselves been GA and used to impulse-start engines which can fire unexpectedly even if turned over slowly when cold.

 

 

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I notice that government also uses consultants to work out if they are performing. My opinion is that consultants seem to cost a lot to tell you what you should know already.I notice that in the email I received that they trust members and maintainers. that is good of them, but is it reciprocated?

I also noticed that this is the safest year since 2017. Wow, that is really something and the year is not over yet.

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Have another go Stillhere, looks like the quote worked out fine but you hit the wrong button before posting.

 

I notice that government also uses consultants to work out if they are performing. My opinion is that consultants seem to cost a lot to tell you what you should know already.I notice that in the email I received that they trust members and maintainers. that is good of them, but is it reciprocated?

I also noticed that this is the safest year since 2017. Wow, that is really something and the year is not over yet.

Consultants quite often use a technique of having someone rate their work so they can use the report as a reference for getting the next job, or as a watertight defence if they are accused of screwing up the work they did. Of course the reference is only as good as the integrity of the consultant they hired to do the report.

 

 

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Keith, I think the surplus of $187,368 is a healthy one given the years of losses and especially given the membership and aircraft number have remained basically the same so hopefully they have turned the corner in terms of operations, however I still very much doubt the ethics of the management and will never forget that we have lost our Association to now being just an administrative business. It means nothing to most of us recreational aviators now due to the hostile takeover of a couple of individuals that stole it away from us members...it is just a business in an office building now and may just as well be CASA shuffling the paper.

You are absolutely correct Ian as the latest example iv,e experienced is indicitive of. I recieved a (membership) card instead of my pilot certificate when i renewed it, I am a member of four clubs already and my association with RAA is for my pilot certificate only, their (club) they can shove eh.

 

 

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You are absolutely correct Ian as the latest example iv,e experienced is indicitive of. I recieved a (membership) card instead of my pilot certificate when i renewed it, I am a member of four clubs already and my association with RAA is for my pilot certificate only, their (club) they can shove eh.

The hostile takeover was by CASA. RAAus and GFA are merely CASA subcontractors. CASA likes this because it gives them "plausible deniability". If some thing goes wrong they will deny responsibility and shove in on to RAAus and GFA. Part 149 is intended to cement this in place. It is a sham of course and the organisations aren't smart enough to say - "Look we aren't going to do this anymore. We are member organisations and it is up to CASA to simply make appropriate regulations for these different classes of aircraft. We already have somewhat simplified regulation and it needs to be put in the main body of CASA regulations."

 

 

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The hostile takeover was by CASA. RAAus and GFA are merely CASA subcontractors. CASA likes this because it gives them "plausible deniability". If some thing goes wrong they will deny responsibility and shove in on to RAAus and GFA. Part 149 is intended to cement this in place. It is a sham of course and the organisations aren't smart enough to say - "Look we aren't going to do this anymore. We are member organisations and it is up to CASA to simply make appropriate regulations for these different classes of aircraft. We already have somewhat simplified regulation and it needs to be put in the main body of CASA regulations."

Mike, many of us had around ten years experience of where RAA was and where it is now, and it had very little to do with CASA and a lot to do with being able to read politics. The strongest direction to go where it is today came from a very small number of people who pushed a barrow relentlessly, then apparently not liking what they had achieved or who they had put in power/or seeing that eventually the Emperors clothes would fall off did runners.

Part 149 does appear to be a move to shift liability from the Federal Government to the users who are deriving benefit, but it's by no means the first. The CWA were among the first group who could no longer rely on a visit from the Food Inspector and a tick on a piece of paper leaving them immune from lawsuits, and they had to adapt to developing their own food handling training, audit systems, and liability insurance. They aren't squawking about it.

 

 

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