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In order to sign out services on the Lancair, I have to be rated by SAAA after attending an SAAA course which is only given for their members. I have no animosity to SAAA, they are a good bunch of blokes, and  I would  enjoy attending a course they put on.  My complaint is  about having to be in 3 similar organizations instead of one. Actually I am resigned to the fact that I will need to be in the 3 organizations.

 

SAAA are no different from GFA and RAAus  in regard to the legality of inspections. You have to be a member to have the rating to do the work legally.

 

I had hopes that the new elaaa lot might be inclusive, but that hope is fading. 

 

 

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I have to be rated by SAAA after attending an SAAA course which is only given for their members

 

Bruce, my understanding is that the course is available to non-members at a higher cost. Also have a look at:

 

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/F2019N00021

 

 

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I work in setting up and/or managing PMOs (Project Management Office), ensure governance is applied to projects including development of frameworks and methodologies...or even just going back to Project/Program Management

 

What sort of projects are you experienced in Admin?  I guess it's not construction from the above.

 

 

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The SAAA course is only available to members of SAAA. We are not set up to cater for non-members, even at a higher cost. Same as other organisations - services provided are for members of the particular organisation only. CASA left the door open for other training providers to invent, sell and run a course, thus far, no takers to do that. That was done to make it "not SAAA exclusive." Maintaining your own aircraft is also not mandatory, it's a choice thing.

 

If I want to drive my go-kart at the local track, I need to be a member. If I want to ride National Velvet on the pony club arena and get a blue ribbon, I need to be a member.

 

Yes, if we have a few varied interests, we need to be in this and that and the other organisation, even if committing aviation is the one common theme.

 

 

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CASA left the door open for other training providers to invent, sell and run a course, thus far, no takers to do that

 

Is there anyone who is willing to assist me in setting up a MPC course open to all comers for a nominal fee - no memberships just a fee for service probably delivered on-line. This is something that CASA should be doing but if they are unwilling it is up to others to do this work. Perhaps an opening for ELAAA

 

 

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I'll help Jim. In a past life, I was an engineering lecturer and in this new life I am quite passionate about encouraging informed owner-maintenance.  Getting recognition for the course will be the major hurdle I reckon, and you may be right about elaaa being a possible accrediting authority. Or do you think casa would do it directly? 

 

One complication would be about how to do hands on stuff.

 

 The GFA is an accrediting authority and I have contributed to the GFA maintenance written stuff ( air loads and torque of bolts were my chapters in the GFA manual ). The GFA offer hands-on courses too.

 

 

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There is no hands on stuff in the MPC course as done by SAAA, but it is done mostly by members who are building or have built a plane.

 

 

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One small problem Jim, well, two really...

 

1. The other door CASA left open is only open to a CASR Part 147 Maintenance Training Organisation that is approved by CASA to provide category licence training. (see CASA Instrument 10/19).

 

2. When the Part 43 maintenance regulations come in (no idea how soon, could be next week, next month, next year, we just don't know..) , we have no idea what happens next. The requirement to do the MPC will change, more likely vaporise altogether. We just don't know yet how CASA are going to play it and what comes next. They have claimed that they will be introducing FAA Part 43-like regulations "with minimal changes." From what I have seen so far, that is not even slightly true. In USA, part 43 maintenance regulations do not apply (at all) to experimental aircraft.

 

 

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Points taken, but I believe an organisation can approach CASA to be added to the list of approved organisations or an alliance formed with an existing Part 147 organisation. I had forgotten about Part 43 but it seems (like so many reform proposals) CASA has too. I believe it is probable that the MPC will transition to something similar to the repairman certificate in the FAR's in the event that Part 43 becomes a reality.

 

Anyway the silence is deafening!

 

 

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US FAA Repairman Certificate is issued to the builder of the aircraft only, by the FAA, upon application, and it's sole purpose is to sign off an annual inspection, nothing more. Good, bad or otherwise, routine maintenance (on experimental aircraft) can be done by anyone there. It's a different world. And thriving there.

 

 

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If you build here you are the manufacturer, but to comply with CASA you need to do the maintenance course. It will not teach you anything about the mechanics of maintenance, but it will teach you all about the why's and wherefores of the paper trail.

 

It will not make you a better maintainer, but it will show you how to provide the details that CASA may come looking for.

 

 

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"It will not make you a better maintainer" 

 

It also keeps the bureaucrats happy & in work.

 

spacesailor 

 

I did the MPC last year - and while I did learn a bit, the whole process simply struck me as a way to penalise the pilot/builder/maintainer if it went pear-shaped. It's a paper trail, nothing more, nothing less. But CAsA says we have to do it, and the SAAA is the unfortunate meat in the sandwich.

 

I built my -9A, at present, I fly it under RAAus and sign off the maintenance as a L1. But soon as I put letters on the side, hopefully over the Xmas break, I need an MPC, Experimental CoA, MR, W&B authorisation and (another) flight review, to fly the exact same plane that the fortnight before, needed none of that.

 

Time to hang up the headset and buy a fourby, methinks. ?

 

 

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"Time to hang up the headset and buy a fourby, methinks. ?"

 

I think you should have had the fourby, way before now., Great "four" Towing, camping & finding those elusive flying fields, That are off the beaten track.

 

spacesailor

 

 

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