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Bridgy89

Affordable Recreational Aircraft

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Bridgy89

Hi guys, I just wanted to get a few peoples thoughts on the best first plane to buy, to do hour building in and the cheapest to maintain and run?

 

I am also wondering about the Rotax 912 engine and what the total run time is on it before it needs to be replaced?

 

Cheers :)

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Geoff_H

Don't build one for cost savings unless you are prepared to wait a few years before flying. If you are building just to go flying I suggest that you buy someone else's finished project. Build when you want the thrill of seeing the finished project.

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Roscoe
Don't build one for cost savings unless you are prepared to wait a few years before flying. If you are building just to go flying I suggest that you buy someone else's finished project. Build when you want the thrill of seeing the finished project.

I think Geoff means building HOURS in flight, not building the plane.

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Geoff_H

Ok sorry

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Nightmare

My aircraft is a good one. It wasn't that expensive to purchase, fuel burn of 12-13L/hr. Inexpensive to maintain, and fun to fly. The TBO on the Jabiru 2200's tend to be around 1000 hours compared to 2000hours on the Rotax's, but the Rotax is about double the price.

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Downunder

Rotax introduced a new crankcase in 2006. Most after that date, are, or can be cheaply configured to 2000 hr tbo. (Cheap, in relation to getting an extra 500 hrs)

It is generally considered cost prohibitive to purchase and fit a new crankcase on those with the old case. These are limited to 1500 hrs.

I think the very early 912's are 1200 hrs.

Having said all that, if my engine was running fine at tbo, I would have no problem continuing to use it for private use.

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Yenn

I consider my Corby Starlet would be ideal. But. You nwould have to be about 5' 11" max height, 80 kg max weight and tailwheel current to even think about flying it.

Cost of a Corby I don't know, but they are advertised at under 20 k..

Running costs with a Jab 2200. Oil change every 25 hrs, Fuel at 10 l / Hr and very little else to worry about.

I keep thinking I should sell mine or my RV4, but I know for a fact that if I sell the Corby I will spend the rest of my life regretting it..

If you could fly a Corby look no further.

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scre80

I bought an 19 registered in march, with a 912 UL engine, it has 470 hrs on it. Have done almost 100 hours in it, costing me around $30 to $40 hr to run. Well worth it for me. My rotax TBO is 1200, but it can be run on condition after that. But it will take me 6 years or so to get there!!. The early 80HP engines have been known to get well over 2000hrs, heard of one over 3000hrs, but need to be well maintained.

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flyerme

There are lots of variables....how much you spending? Where you flying to?solo or pax? Are you in a hurry or happy to plod along? T/W or N/W?

There is no right or wrong answer. Really up to the individual needs ..

But imo

2 strokes are the cheapest to purchase , are the cheapest and easiest to maintain , however only have a recommended TBO of 300 hrs, tend to burn a bit of fuel and require 2st oil.

 

19 and 10. Reg planes can be self maintained...

 

If your only flying solo then shoot for a 95:10

If wanting a pax go a 19

If your not qualified to maintain your own aircraft (and don't kid yourself if your not -your life depends on it) then anything that catches your eye ;)

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Happyflyer

Any RAAus aircraft can be self maintained if you have an L1 authorisation and the aircraft is not used in a flying school.

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farri
Hi guys, I just wanted to get a few peoples thoughts on the best first plane to buy, to do hour building in and the cheapest to maintain and run?Cheers :)

 

Maybe not what you want to know but!... I`ve been asked this question many times, over the years and my answer is still the same today...Workout exactly what you want to do and what you want from the aircraft then go and find the aircraft that will do it.

 

Regardless of any information give here, if you don`t know or are not sure of what you want from the aircraft, how can you decide which one is best for you?

 

Frank.

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Downunder
Maybe not what you want to know but!... I`ve been asked this question many times, over the years and my answer is still the same today...Workout exactly what you want to do and what you want from the aircraft then go and find the aircraft that will do it.Regardless of any information give here, if you don`t know or are not sure of what you want from the aircraft, how can you decide which one is best for you?Frank.

 

100% in agreement. I've seen several purchases where the buyer bought because the price was good or it was a local plane.

All this is irrelevant if the aircraft won't fill the need it was purchased for.......

Do you want to be a morning/afternoon CTAF flyer, doing a few circuits and a short local a couple of days a week?

Do you want to go on extended holidays across Australia?

Very different requirements.

Think of MTOW, endurance, on strip/off strip capability, speed.....

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ClintonB

look at the aircraft extremley closley. i bought what was a good price. only to have spent 3 years and 10k extra fixing and still havent flown it.

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facthunter

The longer you take to decide the better your choice will be. When you are hiring you know what you will pay /Hr. When you own a plane you never know what you might be up for next week.

IF you value a well maintained plane you can trust, you have to own the plane you fly. It's the only way to have absolute control of how it's flown and maintained. Nev

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manna

I fly a Zenith Zodiac 601 XLB which I built , the running costs per hour is $50 / hour, and this take into account the Hangarage, and Baising fee at the airfield, and is based on flying 100 hours per year. The plane has a Rotax 912 ULS 100 Hp engine in it, which now has 3152 hours on it and is being run on condition. The secret is to run the Rotax on 98 Unleaded fuel and to do the regular maintenance. If I need to run Avagas, I then change the oil every 25 Hours. The engine has been run on 98 Unleaded for most of its life.

Cheers

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facthunter

A skyranger is a relatively quick build, that ticks a lot of the boxes. Building a plane on your own with no contact or help from others is not for me. It can literally take ten years sometimes and then you haven't been doing enough flying in the meantime as the dough is going into the plane. You only have one life. Make the most of every hour you can while you can. Nev

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cscotthendry
A skyranger is a relatively quick build, that ticks a lot of the boxes. Nev

When I built the Nynja, I was very slow and careful, and it took me 11 months to build. Greg, the dealer, built his in 10 weeks! So that is the long and the short of it.

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bexrbetter
You only have one life. Make the most of every hour you can while you can. Nev

 

Absolutely true Nev, but some people also enjoy the build itself.

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boleropilot

the one piece of advice I will give is to try to get an aircraft you can use for your flight training (assuming you don't have a licence) - you will save a bundle IF the instructor is willing to use it

 

I lied - another piece of advice - if you're going to buy a kit, try to find one already started or from someone who bought it and never started - again, you will save a lot (IF it checks out OK)

 

cheers

 

BP

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facthunter

That's true of course. Once I would have been more interested in building than flying but that changed a bit somewhere but I did qualify the situation. By "yourself" is doing it the hard way. It's best to interact with other people. You bounce ideas around and can save a lot of time by having a number of sets of assemblies going at the one time. There's economy on having more of anything if you are buying it in. People who build boats and planes have a lot of time with themselves. Its so demanding, other things get sacrificed. Some don't do much flying and pull out of social events they might have otherwise gone to.. Quite a few would wish they hadn't started the project and have to finish it to realise something for the tremendous effort in time and money. It's probably the only way to get the "standard" you might want it to be. also. Nev

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Hargraves

I think it true to say that just about every pilot will have a differant opinion on your queries based on their own experience, intensions, age and financial status, but still the most important consideration is what you actually want to do and achieve. If you want to fly buy a cost effective aircraft that will at least achieve your first stage objectives. If your more interested in doing fine engineering than flying go the other way and enjoy that. True to my first comment, I to am biased due to my own experiences, intentions and timeframe finances and would suggest for a first COST effective and delight to fly aircraft you take a GT 500 for a fly. They are by no means the be all of everything in the air but are factory produced using CNC machinery with excellent design, workmanship and safety record and I repeat most importantly are a delight to fly. Iv,e brought another one regretting selling the first for hanger room for my storch reasons (only). Cheers Hargraves

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Downunder

I'll throw this in amongst the "budget" options.

If you want to buy for long term ownership, there is nothing wrong with buying new aswell.

If you can get a loan at a good interest rate, it may be an option.

Atleast your immediately flying, have the prestige of a new aircraft and not dealing with previous owners "issues".

In the long term, it can be a very viable and cost effective ownership model I believe.

Works for me :victory:

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cscotthendry

Here's another consideration, and one I outlined on another thread. If you're considering buying a partially built kit, or even one that has been completed already, check it out very carefully. Make absolutely sure you find out what you're getting for your money and how carefully (or otherwise) it was built.

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