Jump to content

Light aircraft crash, S.A. Riverland


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 123
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

He has been judged by his peers and found wanting. 

 

Good result.

 

Good result?  Regardless of anything else that seems a tad harsh.  The man is seriously injured and in ICU.  Not something I would wish on anyone.

 

 

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Good result?  Regardless of anything else that seems a tad harsh.  The man is seriously injured and in ICU.  Not something I would wish on anyone.

 

You’re happy with someone flying around the town at power line height? How would you feel about him if he’d hit a house and killed some of your family?

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
You’re happy with someone flying around the town at power line height? How would you feel about him if he’d hit a house and killed some of your family?

 

No, I'm not.  But that has nothing to do with thinking its a good result that someone is in ICU.    

 

 

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Over time quite a few Cowboys have been on this forum doing "exciting low flying" things and being warned about it. It's not usually a matter of "will it happen" just a matter of WHEN. These people are a risk to others and damage the reputation of those who do the right thing as we are all collectively lumped into the same basket, by the general public.  No one wants people dead or seriously injured but it often has a "certain" inevitability about it. Luckily no one else was involved, which is not always the case. As usual we can learn by other's actions, If we want to.  or think "accidents?" only happen to other pilots . Nev

 

 

  • Agree 3
  • Winner 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Years ago, there was a "$h1t hot" pilot who did things his way. Couldn't be told. Ended up dead along with his mate in a vineyard. Still happening. Most can see that the gift of flight is a rare and wonderful thing not to be abused. I'm happy to be able to do a few circuits when I can and be thrilled by the experience. As Chuck Yeager said, "Don't screw the pooch!"

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
No, I'm not.  But that has nothing to do with thinking its a good result that someone is in ICU.    

 

Ah, I see; I don’t think he was talking about the patient but us peer group recognising what he did and showing recognition.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Most experienced pilots realise that  flying is not very forgiving of errors and misjudgements. Most things have to go right for survival in the long run..What actual ODDS apply to YOU depends on your attitude  to safety and whether you can see that some things require far too much luck to do often or at all.  Nev

 

 

  • Like 4
  • Agree 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
You’re happy with someone flying around the town at power line height? How would you feel about him if he’d hit a house and killed some of your family?

 

Alf Jessup said: Have been waiting for this day to come, I and others chipped him on his flying antics only to be told we don’t know what we are taking about, tried to tell him his continual risk taking will catch up to him and yesterday it did.

 

He has been judged by his peers and found wanting. 

 

Good result.

 

Obviously this bloke is one of those types who thinks that they are the centre of the Universe. I bet he'd be a B to work for.

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

This bloke reminds me of a local crash that happened on the outskirts of Perth, probably about 30-35 years ago. I can't find the report, I think it's probably buried in the BAS archives.

 

The same type of bloke as this Evektor pilot got his PPL, thought it was really cool to regularly buzz people, animals, trees, and other stuff on the ground, at way below LSALT.

 

He hired a low wing 4 seater with fixed undercarriage and took 3 friends for a fly, still pulling the same stunts, showing off.

 

He buzzed some cows in a paddock, but misjudged the height, clipped the cow with the undercarriage, the aircraft flipped and went straight into the ground upside down, and all 4 were killed instantly.

 

I really do not understand the mindset of these people, but it's obvious there needs to be more psych profiling to weed them out as entirely unsuitable to be put in control of anything that's powered, where personal responsibility for obeying regulations and training, is seriously lacking in them.

 

It's the Arthur "Bud" Holland mindset, a real deficiency in their level of understanding of responsibility, that is effectively a major mix of immaturity, and know-it-all arrogance.

 

Many seem to kill themselves, a lot kill a serious number of other innocent people.

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Agree 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

In the hanger parked next to the aircraft i hire is a the aircraft of a former well know forum member who we lost a few years ago. And that helps reminds me to be safe.

 

 

  • Like 3
  • Agree 2
  • Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

There's probably a bit of show off in most of us. It has to be managed so you don't become it's slave. There's plenty of challenge in less spectacular things. Allowing for winds from a row of trees or a hangar, Coping with a gust on final. Planing your  X-Country well and having it just fall into place because of the  thoroughness of your preparation/planning. Landing and securing your plane to avoid  changed Met conditions rather than pressing on.   Nev

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Agree 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately "unauthorised low-level flight in contravention of CAR157", features primarily in a fairly sizeable percentage of light aircraft crash reports.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Fortunate that generally such ego pilots rarely fly bigger stuff.

 

Sad outcome but stupid trumps brains way too often.

 

We need to be very proactive to keep our sport and reduce the idiots.

 

Yet again someone reaches for a Darwin award.

 

Glad no innocents were harmed.

 

 

  • Agree 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

from the crash comic  some good info

 

Have you heard of Cobber Kain, a New Zealander and an ace in the Royal Air Force in WWII? He died not as a result of enemy action, but in the conduct of unauthorised low flying. He was doing a beat-up to impress his friends. They were all very impressed and the best came at the end, when he hit the ground and killed himself. And how about Bluey Truscott, DFC and Bar? He was an RAAF ace. Bored with operating from Exmouth after the excitement and drama of battle in Europe and the Pacific where he claimed many kills, Bluey decided to do a few mock attacks on a Catalina he was escorting to base. Unfortunately on the last attack Bluey didn't realise the Cat was about to land -and it is almost impossible to judge height over smooth water. Despite frantic last-minute calls of 'Pull up, pull up!' from his wingman, Bluey hit the water at high speed and was no more

 

Changes of contour can be very deceiving and you can rapidly run out of airspeed as the aircraft climbs up a gradient you had not detected. For the average light aircraft, you will be surprised how shallow that gradient is.

 

False airspeed perception

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
In the hanger parked next to the aircraft i hire is a the aircraft of a former well know forum member who we lost a few years ago. And that helps reminds me to be safe.

 

Majors lightwing?

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have Bluey’s biographer by Paul Brickhill (Dam Busters author) and Bluey nearly didn’t make it into the airforce because he used to round out to land his Tiger Moth about 15’ above ground. Every landing was a crash.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess that would make it difficult.  You were expected to solo in about 8 hours but you didn't have to queue at the holding point or worry about radio procedures. All over field took care of the crosswind issues. Nev

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's highly unlikely any information on the condition of the pilot will be released, unless his family agrees to it. Health conditions of a person are covered by very strict privacy laws.

 

The only detailed report I saw, was that he was pulled from the crashed aircraft by his family, as he crashed only a short distance from the house, and several family members witnessed him crashing.

 

Family members had to lift the engine off him and drag it aside, and his mother, who is a trained nurse, was one of the first on the scene, and administered first aid to him.

 

The report went on to say he suffered severe chest and leg injuries, and I'd have to opine it will be a long road to recovery for him - although it's amazing how well the body heals itself, and often people make a good recovery, even from very severe injuries.

 

 

  • Helpful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
clipped

 

The report went on to say he suffered severe chest and leg injuries, and I'd have to opine it will be a long road to recovery for him - although it's amazing how well the body heals itself, and often people make a good recovery, even from very severe injuries.

 

Indeed recovery can be long and surprising ... 1 year today since I did this on the way to work.  Trapped in vehicle for a couple of hours, operations in several hospitals around NSW and a year of rehab ... I now walk without a stick and appear mostly normal ... but every step of every day is painful.

 

I was very fortunate that all the damage to me was limbs - lots of metal bits to hold it all in place and work to get all the soft bits working again.

 

Regardless of fault in his flying of which I have no knowledge I wish him the best in his recovery as I can appreciate what may be involved.

 

PS - I got a WHOLE new concept of pain on a scale of 1-10 when they moved a leg that was no longer in its hip socket.

 

Ute.thumb.jpg.f5400a8c279f82e69a92937cc7962952.jpg

  • Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...