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Light aircraft crash, S.A. Riverland


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I think most pilots know that low flying is dangerous but they still choose to do it. I talked to a bloke with who flew in a dangerous manner and he said he was just having fun and I said yeah but you are dead a long time. Now he's dead, it's all a part of evolution, most times you can't change it.

 

 

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I think most pilots know that low flying is dangerous but they still choose to do it. I talked to a bloke with who flew in a dangerous manner and he said he was just having fun and I said yeah but you are dead a long time. Now he's dead, it's all a part of evolution, most times you can't change it.

 

Yep, I do it at least twice every flight......  ?

 

 

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My low flying takes place each take off and landing - probably a bit cryptic but that's how my head works....

 

Well in that case you and FH are grounded according to CAR 157, Low Flying.

 

Which is interesting, but they may have covered themselves by having a definition for take off and landing, which should both be on an ALA or ALA standard airfield.

 

An ALA standard airfield not only has a length which allows for a pilot mistake rather than the POH landing and take off distances, but has the correct splay and object clearance angles.

 

So the environment is much safer below 500 feet than the surrounding countryside which these days is filling with power lines.

 

 

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I have no idea what you are trying to say there.. There's no guaranteed safety in  being low. and you have less leeway to adjust flight paths and cope with gusts malfunctions or someone taxying across the runway . Landing and taking off is also conducted at slower speeds than most other flight activities. . Far more critical. Nev

 

 

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Mine are generally for everybody but obviously often in part or fuller response to some post if I didn't start the thread. The more inclusive the better, but I see your point. Sometimes there will be say 3 quick responses during the time you get around to finishing yours.  Nev

 

 

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 Like if unintentional spins are not permitted that  issue is covered (and we know it isn't). The approach and go around and climb out are the most critical phases of flight, where lots of people come unstuck. due insufficent awareness of  critical aspects of low flying . I contend a suitable low flying course (such as was part of my training) is essential to correcting the problem . AS a GA instructor I gave low flying lessons. I did also in RAAus but now it's been restricted to only people who NEED ??? it .   Nev

 

 

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Yes low flying was part of my PPL and was there to help you deal with a situation where you may find for various reasons you may need to put down so it was about checking an area for a suitable landing that would hopefullly be survivable and the go around with appropriate use of flaps (if working) airspeed etc in close proximity to the ground.

 

 

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When I was learning, (50 years ago), there was a designated low flying area in the Moorabbin training area. My instructor, an ex-BOAC Britannia captain, took me down to fence height. You could see the dandelions. 

 

 

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I think most pilots know that low flying is dangerous but they still choose to do it. I talked to a bloke with who flew in a dangerous manner and he said he was just having fun and I said yeah but you are dead a long time. Now he's dead, it's all a part of evolution, most times you can't change it.

 

You would not have to be very bright to work out the low flying I was talking about was not take off and landing.

 

 

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You would not have to be very bright to work out the low flying I was talking about was not take off and landing.

 

No, but I think some were trying to obfuscate to find excuses to do it.

 

 

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There was a guy at Gawler who took off from a taxyway which served a line of hangars. I thought this was funny at the time and didn't say anything.

 

A few week later, this guy crashed ( not at Gawler )  doing a stupid stunt and killed a 17 year old kid (passenger) with himself.

 

I was wrong to keep quiet at the first incident. Maybe a telling-off might have prevented the big crash. At the least, the parents of the kid might not have approved of him flying with this guy if they had known more. In hindsight, he should have been banned from carrying any passengers.

 

My friend had "told him off" more than once with no effect and, as I said, was criticised by the coroner for not telling CASA about his behaviour which was considered to be the appropriate, reasonable thing to do as people like that don't listen to anyone else. As a result, the parents of that lad were devastated. I can guess what the coroner might have said about anyone who had seen his antics and considered it funny.

 

 

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. I contend a suitable low flying course (such as was part of my training) is essential to correcting the problem . AS a GA instructor I gave low flying lessons. I did also in RAAus but now it's been restricted to only people who NEED ??? it .

 

Loads of inconsistency in both CASA and RAAus 'policy' on low flying training.  Recent articles pleading with pilots not to fly into IMC, and to do IF training, yet the same principles are not being applied to low level.  Were both bodies to adopt a realistic look at pilot training, they would understand that correct training not only instils a healthy regard for IMC or LL, but does better equip the pilot to cope with emergency requirements.  Yes Nev, all pilots actually 'need' some basic training in both LL and IF.  The current RAAus policy on LL is simply 'in denial'

 

happy days,

 

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BTW - Tim is alive and kicking.  He is out of ICU and on the repair.  One leg had to be amputated below the knee, but Tim is taking it all in his stride.  He is alive - that's the best bit!

 

 

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I also did low flying as part of my PPL years ago. It was great training and showed me what could go wrong. If you have done it and then go on years later and low fly, just bearing mind that having your eyes outside the cockpit all the time will kill you, just as easily as having them inside. If you cannot understand why, just think about what you are fling in and where. If necessary I will explain, but working it our for yourself is a way to learn.

 

 

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