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We now know why and who is manipulating RAAUS for their own benefit.this is why the weight increase is being driven at all cost to the detriment of 99.9 percent of members

 

 

 

CT Simulator Proves A Winner At AirVenture Australia

 

 

 

 

AeroJones Builds CTLS Aircraft And A Full-Motion Training Simulator

 

 

To better prepare pilots to fly the AeroJones Aviation Technology CTLS Light-Sport Aircraft currently manufactured in Xiamen, China, the company created a full-motion flight simulator. This machine proved to be a major attraction at an airshow called AirVenture Australia (AVA) in New South Wales.

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The AeroJones CTLS Simulator allows pilots — or those entering a light aircraft for the first time — to learn the operation and controls of the modern carbon fiber airplane with state-of-the-art digital instruments. With large TV screens providing a simulated horizon, a six-axis motion system gives visual and tactile feedback to occupants. In short, it perfectly imitates an actual flight in the world’s most popular Light-Sport Aircraft.

Even knowing the high state of technical sophistication in their Simulator, AeroJones did not initially realize what a successful product they were creating with the CTLS Simulator. At the AirVenture Australia show at Parkes Regional Airport, the AeroJones CTLS Simulator attracted crowds that grew into long lines every day.

“We had 70 people on the opening day, 80 on the second day, and more than 100 people on the third day. Despite limiting those sampling the CTLS Simulator to a few minutes per person, AeroJones staff and our Australian dealer, Michael Monck, were busy from opening to closing,” said Charlie Chen, who handles international business for AeroJones. Monck also serves as Chairman of Recreational Aviation Australia and is the developer of eLogger, an online method of logging pilot flight hours.

“Every day was busy, but the third day schedule was packed full for 10 hours to accommodate all those interested by the CTLS Simulator AeroJones shipped to Australia for the event,” added Chen. “More than 250 people took an opportunity to simulate a flight in our CTLS aircraft.”

mail?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.aero-news.net%2Fimages%2Fcontent%2Fsportav%2F2019%2FCTLS-Sim-1219b_tn.jpg&t=1575515510&ymreqid=9aa9febe-0175-51cb-1cc9-3f001801ac00&sig=oCufzR6hW2zM2dxHlrW3wA--~C

In its home country of China and in nearby Taiwan, AeroJones has taken multiple orders for the CTLS Simulator to be used in universities and flight training operations. As the nation works to supply more pilots to its airlines, military, and for personal and business flying, innovative products like the CTLS Simulator are helping to introduce Chinese students to light aircraft. Since most have never seen such a flying machine, a CTLS Simulator can provide a first-contact opportunity to millions of Chinese citizens.

CTLS Simulator can be acquired for a modest price of about USD 50,000 during the product’s introductory phase. “At this price and given its high state of development, AeroJones CTLS Simulator is an excellent value,” said Monck. Other full-motion cockpit simulators often cost far more than AeroJones’ CTLS Simulator.

In addition to the CTLS Simulator, AeroJones has also been building the full-flying CTLS Light-Sport Aircraft in its Xiamen facility. “Approval has been granted for both the design and manufacture of the aircraft by CAAC, the Civil Aviation Administration of China,” said Mr. Hsieh Chi-Tai, General Aviation Development Vice President for AeroJones Aviation. First developed in Germany, AeroJones acquired all manufacturing and distribution rights in the Asia-Pacific region for the world’s best-selling Light-Sport Aircraft.

As AeroJones prepares to expand its airplane manufacturing, the Xiamen company is working with leaders of Zhenjiang, China to create a brand new manufacturing facility near the Dalu General Airport. Work to build the all-new factory will begin in late 2019.

Already functioning in the new location is the AeroJones flight school operation at Dalu General Airport near Zhenjiang City. “AeroJones’ Zhenjiang flight school makes effective use of their 6-axis of motion CTLS simulator, which was first shown to the public at the Zhuhai airshow in fall of 2018,” said Michael Chou, who handles marketing for the Xiamen company. “The CTLS simulator has dual control joysticks and rudders so an instructor can help a student learn the procedures and perform maneuvers.”

“The market is growing for Chinese general aviation,” said Chou. “The combination of new factory, a professional flight school, and the full-motion simulator are strong assets allowing AeroJones to provide the most complete light aircraft operation in China.”

(Images provided with AeroJones news release)

 

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We now know why and who is manipulating RAAUS for their own benefit.this is why the weight increase is being driven at all cost to the detriment of 99.9 percent of members

 

 

 

I knew it, I suspected all along the weight increase in Australia was so that CTL could sell more simulators in China, it makes complete sense.

 

Now I'm off to polish some stones down by the river so that my house paint won't fade, cause that makes complete sense too.

 

 

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Michael Monck is the CT dealer for Australia, I spoke to him in Parkes. They ran the simulator all weekend, i was lucky to get a 10 minute demo and it was good. All money received was donated back to RA-Aus scolarships according to the receipt i was given so i dont know why there is a problem.

 

 

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I wonder who is going to be the new Australian Dealer for the former Flight Design aircraft now called the CTLS being manufactured in China.

 

 

 

Why can't you just say Monck is the CTLS dealer and you believe the push for weight increase might be beneficial to him, therefore you believe also a possible a conflict of interest, it's a reasonable statement, and no need for playing games.

 

I would like to know which model you refer to please, that would benefit from a weight increase, if that's your assumption ..

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flight_Design_CT

 

We now know why and who is manipulating RAAUS for their own benefit.this is why the weight increase is being driven at all cost to the detriment of 99.9 percent of members

 

 

 

   How is it a detriment to 99.9% of Members? 

 

 

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Let's face it. One of the reasons for wanting an increase in MTOW is that, for many of us, the Good Life has left us too heavy to allow our small aircraft to carry two persons and full tanks.

 

 

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The MTOW increase will mean little for 99% of RAA members

 

A very small group of GA reg aircraft will benefit but heavier new models also will be winners

 

 

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Owners of aircraft heavier then the present rules, should have made CASA, give the single engined aircraft a lower specification than is now allowed.

 

The new RAA weight  increase could ruin the certification, RAA now enjoys.

 

Full medical, full licence  for CTA, & whatever CASA  wants to throw at us.

 

spacesailor

 

 

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Full medical, full licence  for CTA, & whatever CASA  wants to throw at us.

 

spacesailor

 

Full Medical? I just did a Basic Class 2 with my GP - so long as you can convince him you're safe to drive a commercial vehicle, you're good to go - it took all of 15 minutes and $10 to CAsA - and let's face it, if you can't meet the standards for a Basic Class 2, are you really safe to fly, yet alone in CTA?

 

Full licence? An RPL with CTA / CTR endo's is all you'll need. You can port your RPC to an RPL at any time by filling out CAsA form 61-1RTX. Then a couple of hours for your endorsements and away you go.

 

My only concern with the weight increase is if CAsA turn around and say "Anything over 600Kg needs a LAME", where they should take a leaf from the Canadian's and have owner-maintenance for 'basic' certified aircraft used in PVT ops.

 

 

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What they should do is a "wish". It would be nice if we took the best of overseas practice. and learn from others instead of repeating mistakes of your own creation. Don't you think a "deal " has already been done with LAME coverage? I do.  Weight Per se has nothing to do with needing a LAME to service it. (within reason)  Complexity and criticality of components /materials and such does. Use a Pietenpol as an example. Not much is simpler. Nev

 

 

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No confusion,

 

Already documented that all aircraft over 600kg will need LAME maint and no reduction in stall speed

 

The RAA President said directly at a pnp to all present that amateur built over 600 kg will be owner maintained. 

 

 

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No confusion,

 

Already documented that all aircraft over 600kg will need LAME maintenance

 

 

 

The RAA President said directly at a pnp to all present that amateur built over 600 kg will be owner maintained. 

 

 

 

Well which is it ...  

 

Incredible, due to  some simplifying that causes a minor weight increase, anyone at home could repair my beast. 

 

It's some of the more intricate and or complicated parts that you need to make things lighter that also makes it harder to repair, not to mention more expensive.

 

What would I know though, I'm actually building it.

 

 

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We do not know what is likely to be approved. CASA are now starting to come up with the first draft of the new weight rules. There ma or may not be an increase in stall speed. CASA have not decided yet.

 

Just give it another year and we may see the first offerings, but that will not mean that change is imminent.

 

 

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There may or may not be an increase in stall speed.

 

 

 

I don't think they should increase the stall speed, besides safety, it's an injustice to those many companies who, combined, have spent millions of dollars and millions of man hours to meet the current LSA regulations.

 

 

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I don't think they should increase the stall speed, besides safety, it's an injustice to those many companies who, combined, have spent millions of dollars and millions of man hours to meet the current LSA regulations.

 

Speak for yourself.

 

 

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Speak for yourself.

 

? Ummm, I was speaking out of fairness for all those companies now on the market who have invested time and money into meeting the current 600kgs LSA rules.

 

Not quite sure what you mean.

 

 

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? Ummm, I was speaking out of fairness for all those companies now on the market who have invested time and money into meeting the current 600kgs LSA rules.

 

Not quite sure what you mean.

 

All your millions of dollars and hours invested.

 

 

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Perhaps we should have stuck with horse and carts.

 

You know, so blacksmiths and saddle makers, etc could have remained actively employed in developing new horse riding (pulling) technology.

 

These dastardly automobile manufacturers ruined a perfectly viable industry.

 

 

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