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When my Brumby 610 was being built in 2014-5, I had the panel setup so that it could be flown as basic analog, (ASI, ALT,BALL,CLOCK,COMPASS - located high on windscreen), or 'full' panel with the Dynon attitude instrumentation in it. I also decided to do away with a mess of small engine instruments and had them included within a Dynon D180.

 

The purpose of this was to allow students to receive better 'attitude' training, and for them to be trained on only the basic analogs in use on many other aircraft. Collating the engine instruments allowed for a full sized radio stack, plus a biiiig gloveb.... oops, sorry, a 'document stowage facility' to be located in front of the instructor.

 

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Fabricated a samsung holder for the new ride. I really like how the original builder layed out the panel and his choice of colour, my favourite also. He must have been a man of vision to leave that vacant space, who knew EFB's would be a thing 22 years ago.PicsArt_1594282276147.thumb.jpg.da2003579d441c6b3eefb8d343e16657.jpg

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Here's my two panels worth

The first is from the Skyranger Nynja I built. The layout is patterned after the Beechcraft Baron. I figured that if Beechcraft spent a lot of money setting up their panels, that was a good hint for me. In the end, it worked very well. The flight gauges are directly in front of the left seat driver, the engine gauges in a vertical line in the middle, and the "not so essentials" on the pax side of the panel.

 

The second one is from my Aeropilot Legend. Aeropilot mostly determined the layout, with a bit of input from me as to placement of the gauges.

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Fabricated a samsung holder for the new ride. I really like how the original builder layed out the panel and his choice of colour, my favourite also. He must have been a man of vision to leave that vacant space, who knew EFB's would be a thing 22 years ago.[ATTACH=full]54551[/ATTACH]

Now where did I see that Vans 4sale refugees entry? I recall the protruding '6pack' panel?

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Here's my two panels worth

The first is from the Skyranger Nynja I built. The layout is patterned after the Beechcraft Baron. I figured that if Beechcraft spent a lot of money setting up their panels, that was a good hint for me. In the end, it worked very well. The flight gauges are directly in front of the left seat driver, the engine gauges in a vertical line in the middle, and the "not so essentials" on the pax side of the panel.

 

The second one is from my Aeropilot Legend. Aeropilot mostly determined the layout, with a bit of input from me as to placement of the gauges.

 

I really like your nynja layout ? don't think it would work on my instrument panel because it's more like a car dash. I wish I could though! Do you like your aviasport gauges? I went with them as well

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Aviasport have been good for me. Also you can hookup an LED off a guage pin so it is luminated when needle is in the red arc, blink when in the yellow arc and off for green arc. Just used the tiny 12 volt ones from JayCar areo.

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Talking of instruments - what's the essential nav aid for a homebuilt? I see a few vertical card compasses there, I've also seen the pedestal style "ball" type sitting atop the dash and then there's similar dash-mounted ball types.

 

The vertical card ones seem to be between 2 and 3x the price of the ball type jobs. Can anyone enlighten me about what's good, bad and ugly in the world of compasses?

 

(And why are non-certified boat compasses around half the price of non-certified plane compasses?)

 

Thanks!

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I have blended Steam and quasi glass into a clean configuration that works for my daytime VFR Cygnet SF2A.

 

A few details seen here essentially laser cut and engraved from Mahogany ply in two pieces becasue of the laser bed limit. Reinforced down the middle (throttle) and along the bottom for switches. Blends vintage steam modern EIS/Digital radios and a Samsung Tablet for AVARE. Works well all the controls are logically grouped to minimize potential create issues. One of those AV-30 Artificial Horizons may find it's way in 2021 in the off chance I wonder into a cloud.1322022662_Cygnet2019panel.JPG.87884ca3ac42abac3281e0ae62899d24.JPG

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I really like your nynja layout ? don't think it would work on my instrument panel because it's more like a car dash. I wish I could though! Do you like your aviasport gauges? I went with them as well

Hi Danny:

 

Yes, I like the Aviasport gauges. They are designed for the Rotax and color coded to make for 'at a glance' reading.

The one drawback I had with those gauges was that the tacho had a very high impedance input and was sensitive to over-voltage input signals. The effect of that was to make the tacho jump around at certain RPM. The fix was a 200 ohm resistor between the signal input and ground.

The RPM pickup in the Rotax is an inductive coil and when lightly loaded (as with a high impedance tacho input) can produce voltage signals of quite high amplitude. These voltage pulses can cause the junction of the input transistors to break over and give erratic triggering. The resistor loads the tacho coil enough to bring the signal spikes down to safer levels for the tacho. Since that tacho coil is not used to drive anything else, it's totally safe to do this.

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