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PILOT MAKES LUCKY ESCAPE AFTER LIGHT PLANE CRASH 18 Jan 2020


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A light plane overshot a landing strip and landed in the Hawkesbury River, north of Sydney, on Saturday afternoon, with the pilot managing to escape injury.

 

 

I can't provide any more information, it's behind a damned paywall.

 

 

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The Cirrus SR22 has almost the same stall speed (54 knots) and landing distance requirements (800 metres from 50 feet) as a humble Musketeer, impressive considering the high cruise speed. The Gunderman airstrip at about 600 meters would require a firm touch down in the first 100 metres.  

 

 

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Plane quicker than the pilot.

 

Cirrus used to target wealthy individuals with no previous flying experience then release them into the world with what some considered to be inadequate training for what is a high performance and complex machine, the result is reflected in accident stats.

 

 

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Cirrus used to target wealthy individuals with no previous flying experience then release them into the world with what some considered to be inadequate training for what is a high performance and complex machine, the result is reflected in accident stats.

 

That may be one of the reasons why there have been so many ballistic chute deployments when something minor has happened with the engine still producing power and the pilot could have continued to a safe landing area had it not been deployed.

 

 

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Sell more to the kind of person who perhaps shouldn't really be flying. The" just like a car and no more difficult". is a false proposition thats trotted out when someone makes a foolproof uncrashable, easy to fly plane. There's a few who shouldn't drive and a lot more who shouldn't fly or use a chainsaw or nailgun.

 

     Some get behind in a fast plane. You really deal with time not distance to keep ahead. of a plane. While these figures don't apply to slower stuff  much, the concept does once you get a bit more slippery . Allow room to manouver, distance, time to do what has to be done You can stop a car in 20 metres. It can take 20 Nautical Miles to slow a jet enough to get flap out.  (3-4 minutes).. Nev.

 

 

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Cirrus used to target wealthy individuals with no previous flying experience then release them into the world with what some considered to be inadequate training for what is a high performance and complex machine, the result is reflected in accident stats.

 

Beech did it with v-tailed Bonanzas a long while ago...the “doctor killer”.

 

 

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Anything will bite you if you are not qualified, even a posties bike, If you are properly trained, Cirrus, Bonanza, V8 Super Car or Harley Davidson are safe if handled correctly. 

 

 

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The worst "gutser" (or "cropper") I've ever endured, was on a Honda Z50J mini-bike. Riding across a paddock of stubble at about 50kmh with my lunch Esky balanced across the fuel tank, I hit the hardened clay furrows on a headland with the front wheel - and the combination of slippery straw and furrow grooves, sent my front wheel skating out sideways in milliseconds, dumping me and my Esky unceremoniously and quite painfully onto the hard clay ground at 50 kays. Never trust anything with small diameter wheels, they're lethal!

 

 

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As long as no one was killed, that's the important outcome. Every one of these types of pilot error accidents (some designs seem to attract more than others) gives us an insight in to just how venerable we are when we leave the Earths bounds to do something that's not natural for us beings.

 

Flying is a skill, it's not a right it's a priveledge to fly, something that can be taken away in a blink of an eye! Remember that old adage, if it doesn't feel right then it usually isn't!

 

 

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One track, my biggest come off was on a Honda DAX for heavens sake. Down a rough rutted clay based hill . Bloody piece of crap. All the real bikes I've ridden and no sweat.  The worst things I've ever been on are scooters particularly Vespa's  with little wheels. Nev

 

 

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Roller skates stop on small grit under the wheels, whereas push-bikes hardly know it's there.

 

In my younger days i'd also ridden Vespa's and Lambretta's, but hated them for that very reason, to say nothing about dropping a small wheel in a pot-hole. :scooter: :yikes:

 

 

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As long as no one was killed, that's the important outcome. Every one of these types of pilot error accidents (some designs seem to attract more than others) gives us an insight in to just how venerable we are when we leave the Earths bounds to do something that's not natural for us beings...

 

Fair go AM! Just because most of us are as old as Methuselah, doesn't mean we deserve veneration.

 

(Bluddy predictive spelling strikes again- we're all vulnerable to it.)

 

 

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venerable

 

 

/ˈvɛn(ə)rəb(ə)l/

 

 

Learn to pronounce

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

adjective

 

 

 

 


  1.  
     
    accorded a great deal of respect, especially because of age, wisdom, or character.
     
    "a venerable statesman"
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Similar:
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    •  
       
       
       
      (in the Anglican Church) a title given to an archdeacon.
       
       
       

    •  
      (in the Roman Catholic Church) a title given to a deceased person who has attained a certain degree of sanctity but has not been fully beatified or canonized.
       
       
       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"Just because most of us are as old as Methuselah, doesn't mean we deserve veneration."

 

I'd say you're pretty safe there, Old K. There's an international shortage of venerators nowadays.......(

 

 

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