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This is a common size for a lawn mower front steer tyre.

 

I bought heaps of tyres and tubes from "Ryanie for tyres" in Clifton.  The ones I used for drifters were Carlisle so any tyre shop that sells Carlisle brand tyres will be able to get some. One example might be the mower shop in Emerald.

 

Failing that, order the front tyre for a Cessna 150 at five times the price but only four plies

 

 

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The company in the link below will be able to supply your needs.

 

https://www.waggabiketyres.com/lsa_tyres.html

 

Remember these points:

 

1. Turf or Lawn/Garden tyres are available in 15x6.00-6 size - cheaply - but they are rated "NHS". NHS stands for "Not for Highway Service".

 

In other words, they are designed for use on mowers, small tractors, electric scooters and golf carts, and are rated for a maximum (off-road) speed of 30kmh.

 

If you want to do 70-80kmh on them, you do so at your own risk. These tyres also have low load capacity ratings.

 

Always find out the tyre specifications and designed use, before purchasing.

 

2. Tyres built for aircraft cost more because they are rated for aircraft takeoff/landing speeds and loadings.

 

Aircraft tyre brands and types, are Sta Air Hawk and Sta Air Trac. Turf or Lawn/Garden tyre brands are typically Carlisle, Kenda and Trelleborg.

 

Be aware that Carlisle produce a Carlisle Reliance Rib Turf/Lawn tyre which is known as a semi-solid.

 

It is not a pneumatic tyre, it is a largely solid rubber tyre with a hollow core to give a cushioning effect.

 

These tyres are common on forklifts as well as turf equipment, and they're quite heavy. Their advantage is, they're puncture-proof.

 

 

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I have used Kenda tyres to great effect. They are usually available in highway specification. Can often be supplied with up to 8 ply rating. One additional point that I would make to Onetracks knowledgeable offering: If possible select tyres with smooth highway tread (not chunky off road). Three reasons:

 

  • The chunky tread will be more likely to "windmill" in the air stream, which can make for annoying vibrations in the air.
     
  • Chunky tread will be more likely to grab/dig in if you have some slight side slip on landing.
     
  • Smooth highway tread does not pick up as much mud on a damp grass strip
     

 

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Yes, Skippy is correct, use straight ribbed tread tyres for aircraft, not chunky-style tread patterns.

 

Skippy, where did you find Kenda 15x6.00-6 tyres with highway speed rating? I have only ever seen Kenda tyres in this size rated as "NHS", and I cannot find any Australian tyre supplier supplying Kenda tyres in this size with a highway speed rating.

 

Here is an Australian aircraft tyre supplier that can supply Michelin and Flight brand tyres in 15x6.00-6. No prices listed, you have to contact them.

 

http://aeroparts.com.au/ocart/index.php?route=information/information&information_id=17

 

 

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................................................................................

 

Skippy, where did you find Kenda 15x6.00-6 tyres with highway speed rating? I have only ever seen Kenda tyres in this size rated as "NHS", and I cannot find any Australian tyre supplier supplying Kenda tyres in this size with a highway speed rating.

 

...............................................................

 

 Onetrack  -You are probably correct about the Kenda tyres of that size not being suitable for highway opps.

 

My nose wheel , a Mitas 12 X 4 28J B1, is rated at 100 kph. Mitas is sold through :

 

Trelleborg Wheel Systems Australia Pty Ltd

83-85 Midland Highway

Bendigo

Victoria 3551

ABN: 16 607 373 062

Tel.: +61 3 9391 8788

[email protected]

 

 

Technical help

 

 

For technical help, please contact us via phone or e-mail:

 

Tel +61 03 9391 8788  

 

Fax +61 03 9391 8766

 

Mail: [email protected]

 

ATEC aircraft do 6 in tyres for about $85 (inc tube) freight & GST on top of that.

 

One little point - dont be too quick to tell a potential supplier what you will be using the tyre for. Some suppliers get very anxious when you mention an aircraft application.

 

 

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Thank you to all who replied to my inquiry, after 840hrs and approx. 1800 lands the mains are showing minor perish signs.They are an unreadable Chinese brand , not certified, fitted from new but I consider have done a fair stint.

 

 

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As a general rule, the cheap Chinese tyres suffer from rubber perishing worse than any other brands.

 

This is because the Chinese don't add enough of the expensive chemicals (called stabilisers) to the rubber that help prevent rubber ageing or perishing.

 

The Taiwanese tyres are generally better quality than Chinese tyres, but the premium quality tyres are the Sta and Michelin (Condor) brands.

 

As befitting their position as "premium" products, you will pay "premium" prices for Sta and Michelin tyres - as indicated by mnewbery's website link.

 

FYI, tyre manufacturers recommend that tyres should be changed out after 6 years, as they claim that general rubber degradation stops them from being able to guarantee adequate performance after that time.

 

If you present with a tyre claim with a relatively unworn tyre, and it's over 6 yrs old, the tyre manufacturers will refuse to accept any responsibility for tyre failure after that length of time.

 

This applies to all tyres, whether they be car, truck, aircraft, earthmover, motorcycle or even lawnmower tyres.

 

At 840 hours and approximately 1800 landings, your current Chinese tyres have provided quite satisfactory service life.

 

 

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One track - there are very many more counties manufacturing tyres - India is pretty big especially in those hard to get sizes. I wouldn't worry to much about the perishing, as you point out tyres have a "shelf" life (I thought it was 5 years) and most will easily last this length of time.

 

 

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Skippy, that's true, tyre factories are in nearly every country today, with India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Korea featuring big in tyre production.

 

But the interesting thing is that the tyre manufacturing factories in these countries are all set up with knowledge and technology from the "biggies"in the tyre manufacturing industry - Michelin, Bridgestone, Continental, Sumitomo, Goodyear, Dunlop, and Pirelli. 

 

The "premium" tyre manufacturing however, is still largely carried out in America, Japan, Korea, France, Spain, Germany and Italy.

 

Unfortunately, Australia's last tyre manufacturer closed down in 2008.

 

It's interesting to find that the larger aircraft manufacturers such as Airbus and Boeing utilise tyre supply contracts as a lever to sell their aircraft.

 

Thus, Airbus awarded tyre supply contracts to Bridgestone in Japan to encourage the Japanese to buy Airbus aircraft. Boeing operate in a similar fashion.

 

 

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Hi Onetrack - It seems to me that all to many very light (RAA) aircraft owners get sucked in to the need to purchase high rated/quality/aviation spec tyres for their sub 600 kg rockets. For the most part light duty tyres will be more than adequate, the exception being aircraft operating in cat head/Caltrop country where higher ply ratings may give a measure of resistance to punctures.

 

 

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The auto industry internationally has specified that a tyre can be expected to function as rated for 10 years from the date of manufacture. After that time, between the ozone the sun and how it was used or stored, failure won't be a surprise and running it to the rated limits after 10 years is stupid. I laugh when I see hire trailers with 12+ year old spares but I do check. 

 

 

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I think light tyres that spend 90% of their time in a Hangar will last much longer than the warranty period. Plasticisers, silicone etc break down with sunlight and higher temperatures and lots of use as in a car.

 

However my tip for tyres is to invest in the "leak proof" tubes. They are not cheap but worth it as they reduced my "pumping up" from once per month to twice per year! On an RV and many aircraft accessing the valve thru wheel pants is not always possible or an easy affair. Yes we can cut access holes in the pant etc etc etc however leak proof tubes are great. Some have thicker rubber which also provides much added protection from those large spikey bindis. 

 

 

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Hi Onetrack - It seems to me that all to many very light (RAA) aircraft owners get sucked in to the need to purchase high rated/quality/aviation spec tyres for their sub 600 kg rockets. For the most part light duty tyres will be more than adequate, the exception being aircraft operating in cat head/Caltrop country where higher ply ratings may give a measure of resistance to punctures.

 

I remember the first natfly at Narromine, my mate and I had "proper" aircraft 6.00x6 tyres on our thruster's and were in a very small group that did not get a puncture from the giant catheads.  

 

 

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...................................................On an RV and many aircraft accessing the valve thru wheel pants is not always possible or an easy affair. Yes we can cut access holes in the pant ..............................................................................

 

Hi Skydog - My tyre valves are hard to see/reach behind the three closely faired wheels - so I came up with a solution which may help you. I have drawn an indelible white stripe, down from the valve, on the inside/outside of tyre wall using "white out". Standing at the prop. I can now pull/push my aircraft until the stripe appears . When stripe  it is vertical, I know that the valve on that wheel is now at its most (still awkward but doable) accessible.

 

 

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Good idea. I put a dob of silicone but it gets dirty and hard to see. ?

 

Thankfully with the leak proof inner tubes it is not a big deal now. 

 

 

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