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Great video, well done GoFly for putting it out there.

Thanks! It's a risk releasing the video, but the feedback we have had so far (2,200 views in 24 hours) is very positive towards Kyle, the Sling aircraft and our training. 8668 is back in the air without a scratch. Had more damage in last November's hailstorm. The farmer was happy with a slab of beer.

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Gofly,

 

No risk releasing the video it is a great training video, shows the training you give pays off up until the pilot is out on his own.

Kyle handled it very well and should be proud of himself as I can see you are.

My biggest gripe with a lot of pilots is between BFR’s many don’t practice a thing, just sit there fat dumb and happy confident the engine won’t let them down.

I myself on every flight practice something and have since I first started 15 odd years ago and it paid off for me one day when I had the holes line up and had a carby icing incident ( which I initially though was something stuck in the needle) which nearly put me on the deck from 2500 ft.

People need to learn from this video that you need to keep your skills sharp.

Well done once again for posting it.

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A real contrast to the P210 that had an engine failure at FL160 over an airport.

 

If I had to critique the sling performance, I'd say a bit more height on the final approach with a bit of side slip as necessary would have created a better safety margin (with a bonus of less puckering); and, wear the ELT on your arm above the elbow as it has been designed to do. You don't even notice it, and it's always there ready to go! A plus was the excellent choice of a cultivated paddock. Grass can be very tempting but if it's 2 feet high (and you can't tell from the air), it can harbour all sorts of nasties like felled trees, stumps, washouts, large rocks etc. Always choose a surface you can clearly see above any other. A good landing on a ploughed field rarely does any serious damage. A great performance overall and deserving of a hearty 'Well Done'!

TN

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If correct terminology was used in the vid this has to be a fuel injected Rotax, would this aircraft not have multiple warning lights for alternator operation and low battery voltage ? Or was it a carburetor type with a failed charging/magneto system?

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  • 2 months later...

Great video! Well done Kyle! Dunno what happened to the electrical system. If it was an injected engine, The engine shouldn’t have been running on battery at all unless the emergency power switch is selected on - which is also your cue to head home PDQ.The falling battery voltage should also have given the game away. I’d like to know what failed beyond the comment on the video : “alternator and battery”. Reference? Pages 4-5 and 4-6 of engine operators manual.

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Buy that man a beer, that's a textbook job and I wonder how many of us would be able to pull that off in that situation. We may think we can but I wonder how many actually could? I know if it was me the audio would be unplayable it would be just one long bleep... And I may have kicked the aircraft after I exited it! A question though. I have never flown an injected Rotax so I am assuming it is dependant on the elec system for fuel supply? Otherwise, I cannot work out why an elec failer would cause the engine to fail as well, yes I intend to do my own research starting right now. Well done again Kyle this will be used many times in the future I am sure as an example of "How to do it correctly". To me the best points are the obvious pushes on the stick where the pilot is positively ensuring he has the correct airspeed! That's what really saved his life in my opinion!

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It's there for comment. Too low on final for sure. It's always better to hit the far fence going slow than hit the near one flying. You should always be aiming to touch about 1/3rd in. If there's much wind don't get too far downwind. A lengthy straight run in doesn't give a lot of options for adjustment. A soft ploughed paddock would have been another matter with small wheels. Where it's obvious vehicles are using a part that can give some assurance the surface is OK. In Australia SWER wires are a risk and being near an access road might help assistance if you come unstuck.. Nev

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I would love to know what turned out to be the cause of the engine failure. Purely for my own professional development not in any way wanting to anything other than praise a job well done by the PIC.

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A real contrast to the P210 that had an engine failure at FL160 over an airport.

 

If I had to critique the sling performance, I'd say a bit more height on the final approach with a bit of side slip as necessary would have created a better safety margin (with a bonus of less puckering); and, wear the ELT on your arm above the elbow as it has been designed to do. You don't even notice it, and it's always there ready to go! A plus was the excellent choice of a cultivated paddock. Grass can be very tempting but if it's 2 feet high (and you can't tell from the air), it can harbour all sorts of nasties like felled trees, stumps, washouts, large rocks etc. Always choose a surface you can clearly see above any other. A good landing on a ploughed field rarely does any serious damage. A great performance overall and deserving of a hearty 'Well Done'!

TN

The accident with the P210 turbine was discussed in an earlier thread, he was not over an airport but because of his altitude he could glide back to Moruya, not sure if your familiar with that airport and weather but two very different situations, in the above video there are quite a few options with clear and relatively flat paddocks, Moruya has no options other than the airfield and he didn't miss it by much.

Good job in the above video but wasn't much room left in the end.

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Don't 912's have an ignition system independent of the alternator/battery? Some form of magneto which is self exciting...

Yes they all have magneto ignition. We are discussing a 912is which is electronic fuel injected, hence the need for continuous supply of electricity.

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Perhaps they should have employed one of our locals when designing the injection version - he has fuel electronic fuel injection which can be switched back to carburettor in an instant. It works and I've experienced it in flight (Sonex/Great Plains VW).

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I'm not sure what type of fuel injection Rotax use but the GP engines use a TBI system as far as I know, don't think the Rotax is set up like that?

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They should just move their flying school to that farmers field, as it is much flatter than the runway at Gympie aerodrome. And if the bloke with the beard could shave it off and stick the hair on top of his head before the next episode, the flying wild Alaska fans might have something to watch. Good landing.

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Great job !

 

Bit concerned by the choice of a cultivated paddock. If it had been deep ripped & harrowed or ploughed with conventional discs the outcome may have been quit a bit different.

 

It would have been good to hear from Kyle about his out landing choice. I did notice some livestock about in adjoining paddocks perhaps he wanted to avoid them.

 

No matter, a great outcome.

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I would like to know how this failure happened. Have read the POH for the Sling2 with 912is. Alternator failure will show on the lane a or b warning lights and the airplane should be landed asap, then there is the second alternator and then the battery. The odds of all three failing would be many millions to one.

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