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My bfr is due this week, just rang the instructor, was told can’t be done because of the we would break the social distance rules, he was going ring raa and try and get extensions for for me, how will this play out

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You should be checking the Federal and State Chief Medical Officer sites and the announcements by the State Premiers; they are the ones who are setting the rules. A 500 member Police Task Force was set up in Victoria this morning to go after those who are breaching the safety guidelines.

Recreational Flying is not an essential industry.

The Prime Minister announced last night that these essential businesses will remain open:

Supermarkets

Banks

Pharmacies

Petrol Stations

Convenience Stores

Freight and Delivery Services

Childcare, but more information to be provided today

Shopping Centres

Bottle Shops

Hairdressing salons

Beauty Salons

 

The Victorian and New South Wales Premiers both provided clarifications this morning for these two states and their live statements are on the Channel 9 App.

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I am seeking specific information on the requirement to have current BFR given extraordinary circumstances prevailing.

I hope they extend it on for you and any others; and that may need to be six months, or a revue of Government requirements at some time in the future.

It's a bit academic though, since all Recreational flying ceases from midday today based on last night's, and this morning's National Cabinet and State Governmenty decisions.

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Recreational Flying is not an essential industry.

 

Note - at the moment that will mean that recreational flying businesses where social distancing cannot be maintained in an activity will not be able to continue those activities where social distancing cannot be maintained.

They have not been ordered to close but practically they will find it impossible to operate flight training.

 

Rec Flying as a business activity of renting out aircraft could continue as you could manage social distancing and of course private flying is not a business and so can continue.

 

On the area of BFR it will be interesting and necessary to see what RAAus come out with as the BFR requirements are in the Ops Manual and not the CASA CAOs/CARs.

It will reuqire both RAAus and CASA to act as RAAus cannot unilaterally exempt/exclude/modify part of the Ops Manual without invalidating the entire Ops Manual - its a CASA approved doc.

 

Not a great deal of help but:

- Group A&B - single seat flyers can do an observed BFR that will allow continues compliant flying

- Group A&B - two seaters without full dual controls do an observed BFR that will allow continues compliant flying

- Group A&B - two seaters with full dual controls BUT with which the examiner is unfamiliar can do an observed BFR that will allow continues compliant flying

- Group C - if you have a combined controls aircraft group you remain exempt from any and all BFR requirements due to issues with the Ops Manual so you can continue flying whever combined control aircraft you have eg flying fleas and Ptyradactyl

- Group D - afraid you need to look that one up - I do not hold it so am unfamiliar with the requirements

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Only listed businesses are required to close. Some like cafes can offer takeaway. Schools are optional in some states. I don’t think there is anything specific about flying schools. There is advice against non essential travel but no definition other than “common sense”. Doing a BFR involves “close contact” which is your only problem. However beauty salons, dentists, physio, chiropractors any other business not listed is allowed to operate.

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Note - at the moment that will mean that recreational flying businesses where social distancing cannot be maintained in an activity will not be able to continue those activities where social distancing cannot be maintained.

They have not been ordered to close but practically they will find it impossible to operate flight training.

 

Rec Flying as a business activity of renting out aircraft could continue as you could manage social distancing and of course private flying is not a business and so can continue.

 

On the area of BFR it will be interesting and necessary to see what RAAus come out with as the BFR requirements are in the Ops Manual and not the CASA CAOs/CARs.

It will reuqire both RAAus and CASA to act as RAAus cannot unilaterally exempt/exclude/modify part of the Ops Manual without invalidating the entire Ops Manual - its a CASA approved doc.

 

Not a great deal of help but:

- Group A&B - single seat flyers can do an observed BFR that will allow continues compliant flying

- Group A&B - two seaters without full dual controls do an observed BFR that will allow continues compliant flying

- Group A&B - two seaters with full dual controls BUT with which the examiner is unfamiliar can do an observed BFR that will allow continues compliant flying

- Group C - if you have a combined controls aircraft group you remain exempt from any and all BFR requirements due to issues with the Ops Manual so you can continue flying whever combined control aircraft you have eg flying fleas and Ptyradactyl

- Group D - afraid you need to look that one up - I do not hold it so am unfamiliar with the requirements

I think your information ceases in 22 minutes time.

The States are putting up websites to end any confusion right now.

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RAA should just suspend BFR's for the next 6 months. Common sense and no brainer. If you have survived this long you SHOULD make it. Smile!

Where is the fast acting RAA leadership (as usual.)

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I reckon that , like road accidents, it is stupid people who are far more at risk than the likes of

us forumites. Surely you need to ignore some basic hygiene to get infected .

This seemingly strange statement could be checked out by checking the road accident history of the whole group. I would bet a bottle of red that we are much safer than average on the road.

Once I read that 90% of road accidents are caused by the lowest 10% allowed to drive.

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I had ONE, and was not the driver. ( almost 64 years or driving, )

Knocked the wife and I about,

Then that Dublin Hospital tried very hard to extort money out of us, for months after, all because the wife was given a Panadol tablet !.

Not going far since ; Fires storms floods now LOCKDOWN !.

spacesailor

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I reckon that , like road accidents, it is stupid people who are far more at risk than the likes of

us forumites. Surely you need to ignore some basic hygiene to get infected .

This seemingly strange statement could be checked out by checking the road accident history of the whole group. I would bet a bottle of red that we are much safer than average on the road.

Once I read that 90% of road accidents are caused by the lowest 10% allowed to drive.

This is not a cold or one of the many flu vriants. The Federal Governments and The State Governments have been pounding the safety advice for people to take. The South Australian Government is one of the better communications, you need to get onto their websites urgently, not only for the basics recommended for your protection, but for SA -specific issues.

For example, did you know that a ship came into Melbourne a couple of weeks ago and, just like the one in Sydney unloaded about 2000 Americans who had a look around Melbourne, went through Geelong, the Greate Ocean Road, into SA, Mt Gambier, Robe, Coorong etc, a look around Adelaide and into the Barossa Valley where some weren't feeling so good. The test results doubled in one stroke South Australia's confirmed Coronavirus cases. Now that whole trail has to be watched.

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CASA's notice from today.

 

[TABLE]

[TR]

[TD]How we’re helping you – exemptions being put in place

The actions of various levels of government to stop the spread of COVID-19 are evolving rapidly and I am conscious that you will have many challenges in front of you as you adapt to this changing environment.

In recognition of these difficulties, we are putting in place various general exemptions for a number of CASA authorisations or permissions, which are designed to proportionally manage safety risks while providing relief as follows:

  • If you have an Air Operator’s Certificate (AOC) or a Part 141/142 Certificate, it will be extended through an administrative process by six months. You do not need to do anything.
  • If you are a pilot or an air traffic controller, you will be able to exercise the privileges of your licence for six months after the expiration of any medical certificate you hold. The conditions on your medical certificate will continue to apply. You do not need to do anything.
  • If your current flight review or proficiency check expires after 1 March 2020, you will be able to continue to use all the privileges of your licence for a further three months from when it expires. You will need to apply to extend these arrangements beyond the 3 months.
  • Operators will have relief from Part 61 proficiency checking and flight review as well as training and checking requirements up to 30 June 2020. Further relief options are being developed.

In addition to the exemptions listed above, we’ll be putting some general exemptions in place to cover dangerous goods, drug and alcohol management procedures and emergency procedures.

Further measures for other sectors such as maintenance organisations and remotely piloted aircraft operations are currently being considered.

Our decisions are designed to make it as easy as possible for you to continue current operational activities while ensuring aviation safety is maintained and operational risks are managed.

If you have specific questions, please email [email protected] (if you are enquiring on behalf of an organisation) or [email protected] (if you are enquiring on behalf of yourself).

Regards

Shane Carmody

Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD] [/TD]

[/TR]

[/TABLE]

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Too many schools and authorities have taken the BFR as another form of income generator, instead of the flying capability assessment that it really is.

I see no reason to extend the clauses of 'Single seat BFR' checks to anyone that at least owns their own aircraft (1 or 2 seat) or is a regular flyer of the club or school aircraft that would normally be used for the test.

I always do BFR's for owner pilots in their own aircraft because 1) they are used to that aircraft and are less stressed when just taking a 'passenger' (the checking instructor) and. 2) I get to fly in a variety of aircraft (I have around 92 types in my log book).

That said, I do fly for fun and don't rely on it as an income stream.

Remember, to make a small fortune in aviation, start with a large one!

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I see no reason to extend the clauses of 'Single seat BFR' checks

OK, just realised I've gone and Ozzie Englished that and technically said the opposite to what I meant.

That should have been;

I see no reason to NOT extend the clauses of 'Single seat BFR checks to owner pilots, or in other words yes, allow owner pilots of 2 seaters to do a BFR solo while observed and listened to by an instructor on the ground.

I spend a lot of time getting students to appreciate that 'flying' an aeroplane is only half of what it takes to 'pilot' an aircraft.

It's trained into muscle memory leaving more concentration time for navigating, communicating and fitting in with other users of the skies.

Pop questions about how aircraft fly, what are the air rules, how do you create a flight plan, can all be asked on the ground (from at least 2 metres away) instead of while burning dollars in the sky.

That said, thanks to kasper and Blueadventures for understanding what I was trying to say, that is if you did agree to what I meant to say...

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OK, just realised I've gone and Ozzie Englished that and technically said the opposite to what I meant.

That should have been;

I see no reason to NOT extend the clauses of 'Single seat BFR checks to owner pilots, or in other words yes, allow owner pilots of 2 seaters to do a BFR solo while observed and listened to by an instructor on the ground.

I spend a lot of time getting students to appreciate that 'flying' an aeroplane is only half of what it takes to 'pilot' an aircraft.

It's trained into muscle memory leaving more concentration time for navigating, communicating and fitting in with other users of the skies.

Pop questions about how aircraft fly, what are the air rules, how do you create a flight plan, can all be asked on the ground (from at least 2 metres away) instead of while burning dollars in the sky.

That said, thanks to kasper and Blueadventures for understanding what I was trying to say, that is if you did agree to what I meant to say...

Yeah I understood. ?

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I wrote an email to RAAus asking advice on BFR requirements when impossible to do due to social distancing obligations mandated by govt. I recieved 2 back from them stating that they were supporting the members etc, etc...blah blah. No information whatsoever in relation to my question. The only news I have had is via BlurE's post 17 on this site. Thanks for being incompetent and derisory in your non-helpful response, RAAus (AUF in the old days was way better).

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I wrote an email to RAAus asking advice on BFR requirements when impossible to do due to social distancing obligations mandated by govt. I recieved 2 back from them stating that they were supporting the members etc, etc...blah blah. No information whatsoever in relation to my question. The only news I have had is via BlurE's post 17 on this site. Thanks for being incompetent and derisory in your non-helpful response, RAAus (AUF in the old days was way better).

 

RAA would like to do what CASA have done but can't without CASA approval.

 

 

Dear members, Instructors and CFIs

 

RAAus has been working on ways to support our Instructors, CFIs and members in these challenging times. We are aware and supportive of the recent CASA initiative to extend flight reviews and medical validity for Licence holders.

 

These initiatives provide some certainty during the current crisis and where the regulations permit. RAAus is working with CASA as a matter of urgency to extend similar initiatives to its members for biennial flight reviews, rating and approval holder renewals and medical validity. Please watch out for e-news updates and more information shortly.

 

The RAAus team

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Too many schools and authorities have taken the BFR as another form of income generator, instead of the flying capability assessment that it really is...

I agree, Pylon. After years of flying solo, I have undoubtedly picked up bad habits, but none of my BFRs have been intensive enough to identify them; I have never felt that I was given a thorough workout.

 

...I spend a lot of time getting students to appreciate that 'flying' an aeroplane is only half of what it takes to 'pilot' an aircraft.

It's trained into muscle memory leaving more concentration time for navigating, communicating and fitting in with other users of the skies.

Pop questions about how aircraft fly, what are the air rules, how do you create a flight plan, can all be asked on the ground (from at least 2 metres away) instead of while burning dollars in the sky...

I know it wasn't your intention, but you've pretty much persuaded me to do a BFR in Taree...

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