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So if we cant fly till Xmas (accept the premise) - Do we expect many sport aircraft being put up for sale.


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My bird is due for her 100. Parts are on the way, and I will not be letting it sit there waiting for Covid. It will have the 100 done, and I will fly her! Recency and Proficiency for me is both mental exercise and essential - full stop!

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That heating pad is the same as the inside of the old electric iron, just need to adapt the heating element to what you need, keeping the thermostat at a low setting if you only want to keep the moisture at bay.

spacesailor

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As I mentioned before, a lit incandescent globe will provide all the heat you need, to drive moisture out of confined spaces - and it doesn't cost US$213 + shipping.

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I'm a grateful soul. If anyone has a nice Jabiru they want to dispose of as a matter of urgency, I might just be able to accommodate it in the car port of my retirement village. If any others are going begging, take it to Admins joint, he'd be grateful too i'm sure.:whistling:

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I also expect many aircraft up for sale in next 6-12 months. Sadly toys you can't use.

 

I also expect many big sail boats will flood the market as owners struggle to maintain and keep afloat their holiday toy. Still seeking a comfy live aboard yacht. Just like aircraft, yachts tend to sell very slowly unless a bargain. It will be a buyer's market, as long as hordes don't get the idea of escape by sea.

 

Still enjoying the pirate life aboard "Walrus". Port Stephens is beautiful and quiet, the noise of dolphins breaching the loudest noise.

 

My timing of leaving the big smoke for water has been most fortunate.

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I have 18 hours up so far, so it’s realistically quite doable. IF my Flying School is grounded for another 6 months, then I would really need to think about it:-)

 

jackc, your enthusiasm in having such for aviation and wanting to do things in your own way and time is entertaining.

 

 

My first student was a farmer, before he finished his flight training to the solo stage he purchased a single seat 95-10 aircraft. When I heard about aircraft, I told him no way he was to fly his plane until we finished his training to at least solo and got checked out by the senior instructor, he agreed.

 

Now just down the road from his farm was a mate who owned a similar ultralight, so you guessed it, with in days they got their ultralight out and went flying around the district and their farms. I flew up to see their new airstrip and as I over flew I could see two aircrafts in the circuit patten. Yep, it was not hard to work out one was my student, who was on short final and as I watch from above I saw a puff of dust and the plane run into the fence before the air strip. Into a sideslip I went all the way to the ground and put the drifter onto the airstrip. I ran over to see the student jammed up against the fence wire, not being able move and just being able to breath, but thank god, not hurt at all. This was his first force landing and only second landing in his ultralight.

 

It is often said in the early days of ultralights, that ultralight pilots taught themselves to fly. Well mostly that's a furphy, as it was fellow pilots teaching each other to fly from their experience in their flying machines. Very few people went out to paddock and leant to fly their machine without any support or advice from other pilots. It was said here that some GA type pilots had more accidents in ultralights, which I think is true as they often would not take advice from ultralight pilots.

 

Now jackc, my student was very lucky guy, I did asked him what lesson he had for pilots wanting to do this type of thing, he said listen to your instructor and always remember, "there are things you don't yet know, that you need to know and yet to lean. ".

 

On that note, jackc, I will let you ponder whether you think your instructor has taught you all you need to know?

 

If your answer is, I really don't know, don't take your plane flying.

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jackc, your enthusiasm in having such for aviation and wanting to do things in your own way and time is entertaining.

 

 

My first student was a farmer, before he finished his flight training to the solo stage he purchased a single seat 95-10 aircraft. When I heard about aircraft, I told him no way he was to fly his plane until we finished his training to at least solo and got checked out by the senior instructor, he agreed.

 

Now just down the road from his farm was a mate who owned a similar ultralight, so you guessed it, with in days they got their ultralight out and went flying around the district and their farms. I flew up to see their new airstrip and as I over flew I could see two aircrafts in the circuit patten. Yep, it was not hard to work out one was my student, who was on short final and as I watch from above I saw a puff of dust and the plane run into the fence before the air strip. Into a sideslip I went all the way to the ground and put the drifter onto the airstrip. I ran over to see the student jammed up against the fence wire, not being able move and just being able to breath, but thank god, not hurt at all. This was his first force landing and only second landing in his ultralight.

 

It is often said in the early days of ultralights, that ultralight pilots taught themselves to fly. Well mostly that's a furphy, as it was fellow pilots teaching each other to fly from their experience in their flying machines. Very few people went out to paddock and leant to fly their machine without any support or advice from other pilots. It was said here that some GA type pilots had more accidents in ultralights, which I think is true as they often would not take advice from ultralight pilots.

 

Now jackc, my student was very lucky guy, I did asked him what lesson he had for pilots wanting to do this type of thing, he said listen to your instructor and always remember, "there are things you don't yet know, that you need to know and yet to lean. ".

 

On that note, jackc, I will let you ponder whether you think your instructor has taught you all you need to know?

 

If your answer is, I really don't know, don't take your plane flying.

 

Well, you are probably right in this case......during my whole life I have been told ‘that won’t work’ or ‘you can’t do that’ or I am ‘wasting my time’ etc. But my life has been full of successes and gains. IF I did not forge ahead and do these things, then at nearly 70 I would have gotten probably nowhere. I am self taught in many things and qualified in nothing, but that has not stopped me and won’t until the day I have one foot in my grave and the other on a banana skin.

Having said that, I will give thought to your advice:-)

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This has to be a wind-up? You just bought an aircraft and now you think you can teach yourself to fly it? And operate safely at low level with no training? I guess being way out n the sticks will be handy.. But leave someone a good plan of your route so they know where to start looking when you don't come back!

 

It’s probably been done before and can be done again! Already having hours up helps, so does a nice wide property road about 5km long in the middle of nowhere:-). I am taking the piss, but the thought has crossed my mind though:-)

Just trailer my plane about 600km and I am there:-)

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Jack,

 

There are no old bold pilots.

 

That is the realm of young, dumb and too full of ego, they think they can do anything.

 

I expect given you are nearly seventy , you would have learned through the years , you do not know everything, can not do anything just with a gung ho attitude and physics does not give a shit about what you think.

 

The are reasons for having proper training and evaluation of your abilities. Do not let your ego write checks your skills cannot pay.

 

The only thing more dangerous than a young fool is a old fool.

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B

Jack,

 

There are no old bold pilots.

 

That is the realm of young, dumb and too full of ego, they think they can do anything.

 

I expect given you are nearly seventy , you would have learned through the years , you do not know everything, can not do anything just with a gung ho attitude and physics does not give a **** about what you think.

 

The are reasons for having proper training and evaluation of your abilities. Do not let your ego write checks your skills cannot pay.

 

The only thing more dangerous than a young fool is a old fool.

 

But an old fool has many life’s experiences and methodologies on his side:-)

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B

 

 

But an old fool has many life’s experiences and methodologies on his side:-)

 

I can appreciate that you are a man of many talents Jack, I think everyone is just saying take it easy, I will add my voice to that.

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I can appreciate that you are a man of many talents Jack, I think everyone is just saying take it easy, I will add my voice to that.

 

Thanks:-). I am probably suffering undiagnosed ‘lockdownitis’ I best go find my Bulldozer, that might be safer!

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.....

 

...It is often said in the early days of ultralights, that ultralight pilots taught themselves to fly. Well mostly that's a furphy, as it was fellow pilots teaching each other to fly from their experience in their flying machines. Very few people went out to paddock and leant to fly their machine without any support or advice from other pilots. It was said here that some GA type pilots had more accidents in ultralights, which I think is true as they often would not take advice from ultralight pilots.

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Spot-on.

 

I were reading student pilot books by age 9.

 

At school any time an aircraft flew over my attention were immediately ‘up there’ until the ruler found my knuckles..?

 

Whilst at school another one of my favourite pastimes were doing those little moving picture cartoons in the bottom right hand corner of text books. As any former school kid knows, draw a picture of an aircraft on one page, then the next page draw the picture slightly different and so-on. At the end yer just quickly flick through all the pages and yer end up with an animated cartoon. One day I were showing me Aboriginal mate my cartoon book efforts of an aircraft doing barrel rolls and loops and he patted me on the back and called me his flying friend. When I were searching for a suitable call-sign over pprune way years ago it occurred to me...

Flying Binghi..?

 

 

 

 

 

.

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I never cease to be surprised by the number of "mature age, very-experienced" people who regularly kill themselves, whilst operating all types of machines.

 

Half of those deaths come down to long experience with their equipment, leading to complacency in dangerous situations.

 

The other half relate to older people who think they know more than they do, when they're learning a new skill. Learn a new skill, you need to be taught the unseen dangers.

 

The mature-age fatality rate is quite similar, regardless of whether it involves mechanised equipment or aircraft.

 

Every powered item of equipment has the ability to kill you swiftly, but none more so, than flying machines.

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