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Any hope of getting a class 2 medical with a kidney transplant?


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Hi all,

 

I think the title says it all, but here is some background: Since I was a child I wanted to become a pilot. This dream was truncated when, due to an autoimmune condition, I had to receive a kidney transplant in 2012. Fortunately, everything went well and I now live a normal life, the autoimmune condition has been inactive since then. I have to take some daily medications to avoid rejection but otherwise I practice sports and I have no cholesterol or arterial pressure problems although the autoimmune condition requires me to take AAS (aspirin, acetylsalicylic acid).

 

Recently I have been doing some research on this topic. The reason is that I found out that there are indeed pilots who have the (class 1!) medical certificate, at least in the US. Note that I am in a European country. Since the class 2 medical certificate is less strict, I would like to at least try to obtain it.

 

I understand that this will eventually come down to the medical authorities, but I wanted to ask if anyone in this forum had some advice regarding the best way to approach this, or has any similar experience.

 

Thank you very much for your time

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Hello Tuto - com e stas?

 

The UK CAA has guidance on its website, which for class 1 and class 2, is still under EASA rules; for geitourinary guidance, see: Genitourinary guidance material (GM) | UK Civil Aviation Authority.

 

Specifically:

Renal Transplant

 

Applicants who have undergone a renal transplant are assessed as unfit. Medical certification can be considered 12 months post-transplant. Renal function must be stable with no underlying systemic disorder that is likely to cause sudden change and blood pressure must be within normal limits. The use of approved anti-hypertensive drugs is permitted. Any steroid dosage must be below 10mg/day. Levels of anti-rejection drugs must be within therapeutic range to minimise side effects. Cardiovascular risk must be assessed by a cardiologist to include an exercise (stress) ECG. To maintain certification, applicants are required to provide an annual renal report. Class 1 holders also require an annual cardiology assessment, including an exercise ECG. The Class 1 certificate will be restricted with OML.

 

This is obviously for class 1, but therefore shows class 2 is not impossible..

 

Look up a local aviation medical examiner and pop them an email.. They usually are only too happy to provide the requisite information. Be prepared to have your doctor and renal medical consultant have to be involved.

 

ALso - do you need Class 2? For the LAPL (EASA's Light Aircraft Pilots Licence), the medical is less stringent I understand and Spain may well have its one VLA/ULA national licence and medical requirements which are even less stringent. In the UK, up into a week or so ago, national licences only needed a self declaration (but the derogation ran out).

Edited by Jerry_Atrick
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Hey Jerry_Atrick,

 

Thank you very much for the information you provide. I was not aware of the fact that the LAPL license requires less stringent medical certificates, I will take a look at the legislation. As far as I am aware of, Spain does not have its own national licenses, all of them go though EASA, but I will do some research.

 

Once the Coronavirus crisis ends, I will definitely try to contact by email a medical examiner to ask them advice on how to proceed in this particular situation. Certainly it seems plausible to, at least, try it, as renal transplantation does not automatically disqualify you for the medical certificate.

 

Tuto.

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I'm not 100% sure the LAPL medical is that much easier than the class 2, however, the UK had a derogation that recently expired - I think it included self-decalred fitness to fly. However, I think they can still do GP medicals - though this may be for the UK NPPL (National PPL), which is the UK version of a LAPL, rather than the LAPL.

 

Good luck!

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Hey Jerry_Atrick,

 

Thank you very much for the information you provide. I was not aware of the fact that the LAPL license requires less stringent medical certificates, I will take a look at the legislation. As far as I am aware of, Spain does not have its own national licenses, all of them go though EASA, but I will do some research.

 

Once the Coronavirus crisis ends, I will definitely try to contact by email a medical examiner to ask them advice on how to proceed in this particular situation. Certainly it seems plausible to, at least, try it, as renal transplantation does not automatically disqualify you for the medical certificate.

 

Tuto.

Hola, los mejores deseos!

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Gidday! I had a heart transplant in 2001 and regained my class 2 medical here in Australia a few years later. As you're probably aware your transplanted kidney is likely to be in tip top condition due to close monitoring by the Drs. Aviation risk comes from side effects of anti rejection drugs which cause increased cholesterol, increased blood pressure and long term hardening of artery walls. Being toxic the drugs also impact kidney and lever function. The CASA here are concerned about sudden incapacitation so as long as all the above factors are monitored and controlled a class 2 is achievable with mandatory review every year.

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Gidday Matty!

 

Thank you very much for sharing your experience, it is very encouraging to see you have your class 2 medical and that you can fly.

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Just Quickly Tuto,

 

I had a few issues some years ago and they continue, nothing like a transplant, but it took some time to work through our CASA's processes. But from what I can workout and to be honest, if you are seeing a Doctor and Specialists on a regular basis, you could be well in front of the guys that don't.

 

Everyone is different, Class 2 here is what I need for PPL with NVFR . It may have costed me more to start with for my testing, but it seems if your blood pressure and heart is good, that's a very good starting point from what I can work.

 

cheers

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