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It is a Lisunov Li-2. Not a copy, and it was built under licence from Douglas, so I don't know where the story originated about "not paying a cent for licence or copyright". Makes for a good urban legend at the bar, though.

 

Boris Pavlovich Lisunov and Vladimir Mikhailovich Myasishchev spent more than 2 years working at Douglas Aircraft Corp in the U.S., to translate the design and blueprints into Russian and metric measurements. No mean feat.

 

The Lisunov Li-2 was so different to the DC-3, there would have been very few interchangeable parts or components. The Shvetsov ASh-62 radial was a Russian development of the Wright R-1820, with 2-speed supercharging and an improved intake manifold. The substantial number of changes to the Lisunov Li-2 over the DC-3 design, were all related to improving operation in bitter Siberian weather conditions, and utilising metric Russian materials and sizes.

 

The Russians built around 5000 Lisunov Li-2's, which outnumbers the approximately 600 DC-3's built.

But when you add in over 10,000 C-47's built for the U.S. military during WW2, the Russian production of their version is only half of the American factories production.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisunov_Li-2

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The substantial number of changes to the Lisunov Li-2 over the DC-3 design, were all related to improving operation in bitter Siberian weather conditions

Yes, we learnt in that part of the world to have as little equipment as possible outside the structure and exposed to the elements...

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It is a Lisunov Li-2. Not a copy, and it was built under licence from Douglas, so I don't know where the story originated about "not paying a cent for licence or copyright". Makes for a good urban legend at the bar, though.

 

Boris Pavlovich Lisunov and Vladimir Mikhailovich Myasishchev spent more than 2 years working at Douglas Aircraft Corp in the U.S., to translate the design and blueprints into Russian and metric measurements. No mean feat.

 

The Lisunov Li-2 was so different to the DC-3, there would have been very few interchangeable parts or components. The Shvetsov ASh-62 radial was a Russian development of the Wright R-1820, with 2-speed supercharging and an improved intake manifold. The substantial number of changes to the Lisunov Li-2 over the DC-3 design, were all related to improving operation in bitter Siberian weather conditions, and utilising metric Russian materials and sizes.

 

The Russians built around 5000 Lisunov Li-2's, which outnumbers the approximately 600 DC-3's built.

But when you add in over 10,000 C-47's built for the U.S. military during WW2, the Russian production of their version is only half of the American factories production.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisunov_Li-2

Thank's for info one-track, just an article I read inside a dc3 on display at the Mareeba air port QLD. Was just outside a repair facility there . That was 15 yrs ago.

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The McDonalds DC3 is in Taupo in NZ and is now a 20 seat restaurant. It was built in 1943 & was used by South Pacific Airlines in NZ from 1961-66. It then became a topdresser & was decommissioned in 1984 & placed in storage after having flown 56,282 hours during its working life. It has been in its present position for 30 years next to McDonalds in Taupo. Originally it was bought by the owner of the car dealership that used to be there to advertise his business the "Aeroplane Car Company" that originally occupied the site. McDonalds DC3

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There's some variations of DC-3, C-47's also. Some had cowl gills that were adjustable and landing gear doors. Most of the Ansett ones here were refitted with WRIGHT single row engines of slightly smaller displacement as that company purchased a large number of the Wright (not RIGHT) engines cheaply.

10,600 is the figure I've always heard. I think the Italian Air Force was one of the last operational military users .Lots of them survived a lot of rough treatment and were pretty tough. TAA's Sunbird Service used them in PNG. That was the period where if you weren't quite sure if it was strong enough you just made it a bit stronger. For me, I'd give it the most significant aeroplane ever built award. Nev

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Dmech - Yes, I note one historian with a DC3 history website, making that statement about "not paying a cent" for the build rights. But he offers no proof, nor any official references, so the statement can only rate as hearsay until official references are provided. The Americans are usually pretty good at making recalcitrant payers pay up, and they have plenty of ways and means of doing so - they will seize assets, including bank funds, if they so desire.

If the Russians never paid Douglas for the Lisunov Li-2 build rights, this would quite likely feature in some discussions in Congressional Records. I have not yet found it mentioned anywhere, in any CR's.

 

However, it is interesting, the amount of free War equipment the Americans gave the Russians during WW2 under Lend-Lease. They delivered more free War equipment to Russia, than any other Allied Nation.

There is a list in the article below - but it's far from comprehensive. The article fails to mention the number of locomotives and the amount of rolling stock provided to Russia by the U.S.

The numbers of American locomotives supplied to Russia during WW2 run into the multiple thousands, and rolling stock into many thousands more railway items.

None of this was ever paid for, simply because it was handed over under the Lend-Lease Act, which was a completely different deal to that done between individual American manufacturers and the Russians, before WW2 began.

 

https://share.america.gov/america-sent-equipment-to-soviet-union-in-world-war-ii/

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to translate the design and blueprints into Russian and metric measurements. No mean feat.

 

The Russians are a loving people. They wouldn't like a plane with mean feet.

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This one's in Mangaweka in NZ. It's covered in giant chocolate chip cookies:

1597124765544.png.765a3ca3cc64caed92987b13e004e043.png

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Onetrack, I would be wary of claims as to who did what during WW2, from both sides of the fence.

We're still hacking our way through the propaganda and misinformation from that event 75 years later.

 

FWIW I also recall hearing that prior to entering the war themselves, the US lend-leased ships to the UK, a number of which were in such bad condition they never made it across the Atlantic. But who knows if that's true either???

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....and this one's is or was a jump ship at Zephyrhills in Florida: seats, shagpile carpet, tinted windows, an 8 track stereo, and beautiful moonlit nights to 15,000'................)

1597125536563.png.686d9b458db84dc03752a0d84224ebd1.png

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