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Yeah Lyle, the rain was well gone and it was a crystal clear bloody freezing day. OAT was showing -6. It warmed up over the Gibraltar range but was very hazy due to the Bees Nest fires. Here I was up at just under 10,000 feet.

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The trouble with any GOOD tailwind there must be some considerable windshear "somewhere" as you come out of it. Jetstreams give you those very high ones. They are usually oval in section and you MAY get some pretty severe CAT' (Clear Air Turbulence) at a level near your max safe cruise level. as you move through it's section going in or out . IF you know where they are you can save a lot of fuel and time, but there are downsides. Going in the other direction you avoid them. Jetstreams in Australia are West to East with a southern tendency so ESE.. from around Broome Nev

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SSCBD..I flew my first Thruster at a Mangalore Airshow. Those airmarshills were notorious for being PITA's. Only allowed 300 ft. How could THAT be dangerous?. Well that was the theory anyhow behind the height limit.. It was actually more dangerous. What year are we talking about? I know they were the first two seaters. Nev

The good old days of flying below 300 feet. So much fun and now you need a special rating - Really a joke in rag wing aircraft.

 

However

 

Nev - Don't remember the year due Alzheimer's must be setting in. However she was the first one we did all the test flying for the now CASA - the thruster Gemini was serial number 001. That's the one I flew and got grounded at Mangalore with the high winds.

 

However, it was in that same year we got first approval or certification of the two set Gemini and to train students with a flying school that was based at Wilton drop zone.

 

Note* I did the flight testing for the two seat Gemini with a parachute on during dive testing past VNE. Funny thing was the nose cone went pop loudly and you got a dimple in the center of it when you got past the VNE. Scared the hell out of me as I thought the sound of the thruster breaking up.

Also it looped well or was that a dream!

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The good old days of flying below 300 feet. So much fun and now you need a special rating - Really a joke in rag wing aircraft.

 

However

 

Nev - Don't remember the year due Alzheimer's must be setting in. However she was the first one we did all the test flying for the now CASA - the thruster Gemini was serial number 001. That's the one I flew and got grounded at Mangalore with the high winds.

 

However, it was in that same year we got first approval or certification of the two set Gemini and to train students with a flying school that was based at Wilton drop zone.

 

Note* I did the flight testing for the two seat Gemini with a parachute on during dive testing past VNE. Funny thing was the nose cone went pop loudly and you got a dimple in the center of it when you got past the VNE. Scared the hell out of me as I thought the sound of the thruster breaking up.

Also it looped well or was that a dream!

Ah the good old days ... my first TIF in an ultralight was in I believe the second registered 25 Thruster over in the Barossa back in Jan 1986 ... after we landed he offered me a scholarship to do cut price training ... unfortunately I lived in the Goulbourn Valley in Vic and was just on holiday with family ... bloody family didn't think me getting cheap flight training warranted them all moving interstate.

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Seems like forever ago.. About 1986 seems right but it wasn't windy for my first circuit (with a big audience). Not much different from the 727 I flew the day before. Hmm. Nev

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Returning from Airventure at around 7500 feet it was really turbulent & I slowed down to 75-80 knots on ASI but noticed the GS was just shy of 170 knots. The highest GS for the trip was 177 knots. I got home in 2 1/2 hours.

 

Wow! I've never seen 90-100 kts that low, that would be a hazard alert if ATC knew about it!

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Early in the testing phase for my RV, 3SMPH groudspeed, if I were a bit more confident in the handling I'd have got it down to 0.

46485824115_0c0b23b56f_c.jpg

:puzzled::puzzled::puzzled::puzzled::puzzled:

Where do you look? Hooly dooly that's busy.

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:puzzled::puzzled::puzzled::puzzled::puzzled:

Where do you look? Hooly dooly that's busy.

Find the left most edge of the horizon on the AH. Just above that is a blue box. (Assuming not rhetorical question.) 3 mph's

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learning to fly J160's.

so think I'm still yet to beat my record of 130knts on a Suzuki Bandit 1200

Admittedly was just a fast taxi, with crosswind being a limiting factor from applying more power, and reducing throttle

144kts taxi Honda CBR :-D

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When I was a student pilot I landed a C150 with no forward speed. The instructor took it up and landed backwards. No photos.

What’s a student doing up in 60 kts odd of wind? Wow

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Why not with an instructor? Serious question.. My instructor used to take me up in appaling conditions, but I could do a decent cross-wind landing.. One day, when I went to the club (RVAC) do do some solo consolidation, the x-wind was close to limits, OVC at about 2,500' and it was lumpy, so winds aloft were all over the place. When I rocked up, the CFI said no way solo. I said I had already had a chat with the instrutor and he was fine with it.. So he agreed I woud do a couple of circuits with an instructir and if the insrtuctor was OK with it,I couls solo. The instructor was surprised at how I could handle x-winds with my hours and let me go solo. Under the eyes and in the cockpit with an experienced instructor, as long as the wind ins constant and largely a headwind, isn't it good tgo beshown first hanf rather than find out without experience some time after getting your licence?

 

Back on track, fastest GS was 203kts at about 7,000' in the TB20

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:puzzled::puzzled::puzzled::puzzled::puzzled:

Where do you look? Hooly dooly that's busy.

Too much for my brain. Even my 3 1/2 inch Dynon D6 has so much it is hard to get instant information from it.

 

It is easy to jump in to a 70s era all steam single & understand everything up front. With a glass screen it takes a fair bit of time to work out where everything is and also to be able to read and interpret detail quickly. Analogue style information as in the tacho & oil temp & pressure is processed at least by my brain instantly compared to the same thing displayed digitally. One good thing about Dynons and I suspect most glass screens is the ability to display in analogue or digital style and there is a de-clutter option to hide detail you don't want.

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I once tried to break the speed record from Melbourne to Sydney. One had to fly over Essendon at 1000ft and over arrive Mascot at 1000ft. I was flying a Avon Sabre and climbed into a jet stream above 40,000ft. I managed to do it in 45 minutes 35 seconds, just 21 seconds outside the record. As far as flying slow, I was once flying over the great lake in Tasmania and my track to Devonport was 338 degrees. My heading to make that track was 270, yes 68 degrees of drift. My IAS was 130 kt and the wind speed was up round 80 +kt.

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Seeing a couple of guys have mentioned motorcycles, I will too - a long time ago, Kawasaki brought out a machine called GPZ900 - or something like that...

I worked for a motorcycle shop and my 'company vehicle' was one of these beasties

I wanted to see how it would go through the gears at redline, so I went up to the top of the Brisbane freeway, turned around and headed back down towards BrisVegas

Redlined it through the gears, in fourth it was still rock steady but getting scary fast - changed into top (6th) and glanced down at the speedo a few seconds later..

240km/h and it was still going - nearly needed an undie change after that.....

 

BP

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I once tried to break the speed record from Melbourne to Sydney. One had to fly over Essendon at 1000ft and over arrive Mascot at 1000ft. I was flying a Avon Sabre and climbed into a jet stream above 40,000ft. I managed to do it in 45 minutes 35 seconds, just 21 seconds outside the record. As far as flying slow, I was once flying over the great lake in Tasmania and my track to Devonport was 338 degrees. My heading to make that track was 270, yes 68 degrees of drift. My IAS was 130 kt and the wind speed was up round 80 +kt.

Hey Orf, I guess you heard about the Sabre that was doing some 'low flying' through the Gold Coast hinterland...

The pilot hit an unseen (obviously!) high voltage cable, snapped it but he managed to get the aircraft back to Amberley, where it is now on display at their museum

When you stand at the front of the aircraft you can plainly see the impact damage (repaired) across the middle of the air intake

Lucky guy, methinks, that pilot.....nearly ripped the canopy off

 

BP

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...Seeing a couple of guys have mentioned motorcycles, I will too - a long time ago, Kawasaki brought out a machine called GPZ900 -...

240km/h and it was still going - nearly needed an undie change after that...

Oh to be young and bulletproof again...

That's 130kts, a sedate speed at altitude, but a quite different experience down close to the tarmac.

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I used to work for an Aeromedical outfit years ago, got plenty of 'customers' from the crazies on bikes! The saddest part was witnessing the parents of said crazy mourning their brain dead sons!

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Some years ago at Lethbridge back when Nev was instructing there {maybee 20 yrs back} a member took off in a little single seater a bit like a small thruster for YBLT about 30 nm away in a strong wind. He returned 3/4hour later having made it all the way to Meredith about 6nm got worried about fuel and came back. we watched him turn final and I put the billy on. Water boiled tea made before he touched down. Greg

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I was flying a Avon Sabre and climbed into a jet stream above 40,000ft. I managed to do it in 45 minutes 35 seconds, just 21 seconds outside the record. As far as flying slow, I was once flying over the great lake in Tasmania and my track to Devonport was 338 degrees. My heading to make that track was 270, yes 68 degrees of drift. My IAS was 130 kt and the wind speed was up round 80 +kt.

What a pretty aircraft the Sabre is, I was lucky enough to be working out of LaTrobe when Jeff took his for a few laps.

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Here's my last fast one. You'll be relieved to hear.

ADL- MEL chock to chock 47 minutes This is brakes release for push back to brakes "on, engines cut "at destination. You don't set out to do these things. They just seem to fall in place and with a little assistance, happen. I took off to the east from Adelaide after a "ready for immediate" rolling start, 330 knot indicated climb, then got a good tailwind to top of descent. Descend at 350 Kts and we didn't have the 250k? below 10,000 restriction and got a straight in to the east at Melbourne straight to the finger. As simple as that. I doubt it will ever be beaten as a few things that helped then don't happen today. The current scheduled time is 70 minutes. This included an inflight replanning back to Adelaide. passed over the radio. It might sound exciting but it's just another day at the office, but you are not just sitting there, fat, dumb and happy. Nev

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Here's my last fast one. You'll be relieved to hear.

ADL- MEL chock to chock 47 minutes This is brakes release for push back to brakes "on, engines cut "at destination. You don't set out to do these things. They just seem to fall in place and with a little assistance, happen. I took off to the east from Adelaide after a "ready for immediate" rolling start, 330 knot indicated climb, then got a good tailwind to top of descent. Descend at 350 Kts and we didn't have the 250k? below 10,000 restriction and got a straight in to the east at Melbourne straight to the finger. As simple as that. I doubt it will ever be beaten as a few things that helped then don't happen today. The current scheduled time is 70 minutes. This included an inflight replanning back to Adelaide. passed over the radio. It might sound exciting but it's just another day at the office, but you are not just sitting there, fat, dumb and happy. Nev

 

Been there done that, gotta do better than that???

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I don't think I could. So much of what happens is out of your hands. Like golf, you putt for sheep stations. At each end is the unknown where you lose the points. Get someone on final when lining up or some so and so is backtracking SLOW. I've had it done on purpose and got sent round " I elected to" because it was too close. Not ALL pilots are gentlemen. Nev

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