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CHANGE FROM MICROAIR TO TRIG VHF COMM


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Hi all

I am considering replacing the original Microair 760 VHF Comm with a TRIG TY91 Radio which uses the existing Panel hole in myJab.

Without going into the reasons for the swap, I am asking if anyone has been using the TRIG for a while and how it compares to the Microair.

Thanks

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no comparison..at least the Trig will work most of the time and not go off to never never land in frequency intermittently..the only issue of course is the cost...but all airband radios now are getting expensive

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no comparison..at least the Trig will work most of the time and not go off to never never land in frequency intermittently..the only issue of course is the cost...but all airband radios now are getting expensive

Thanks Kyle.

I have the Trig Transponder which in 6 years has never been a problem and no issues passing calibration checks.

Your comment WORKS MOST OF THE TIME however makes me wonder??

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Hi all

I am considering replacing the original Microair 760 VHF Comm with a TRIG TY91 Radio which uses the existing Panel hole in myJab.

Without going into the reasons for the swap, I am asking if anyone has been using the TRIG for a while and how it compares to the Microair.

Thanks

I have trig gear. Good choice. Very good. 230 hours no issues. Regarding a harness you will need a 4 point crimp tool or solder the pins. I did the solder method and if I need to redo I'll get a crimp tool and die.

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I guess those in a position to see/evaluate a lot of transeivers will be able to make, hopefully, objective comments. As the very satisfied owner/user of an XCOM - a much criticised radio, I do wonder sometimes about such things as:

 

Has the radio been installed as per the suppliers instructions ? - Particularly in regard to:

  • Appropriate type, located and tuned antenna
  • Ventilation (cooling air flow)
  • Well supported in a minimal vibration location
  • Secure electrical connections
  • Well earthed
  • Adequate ground plane

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I have trig gear. Good choice. Very good. 230 hours no issues. Regarding a harness you will need a 4 point crimp tool or solder the pins. I did the solder method and if I need to redo I'll get a crimp tool and die.

From all of my experiences with soldering on vibration prone equipment I would buy the crimp equipment now and redo before the inevitable solder failure. Solder causes a fatigue failure at the point where the solder ends on the wire. According to Murphy the most important joint will fail at the most critical time, but Murphy was an optimist ?

I too once soldered a jointing my intercom system.... luckily not a critical system. However I carried a very small gas powered soldering iron on touring, just to get me home, and yes used it at Carnarvon to repair my intercom. Crimped all joints when I got back home

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If soldering is unavoidable, then put heat shrink over the wire and solder joint area. It may help reduce the fatigue effect on the wire, no promises.

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sorry..the trig will work..they are good quality radios and always have been..my mind was shuddering just thinking about the nightmareair sorry microair :)

 

If M/Air radios are a nightmare, what is a good radio available at a reasonable cost nowadays?

 

While we are about it, what is a good value transponder?

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A good soldered joint bonds the 2 wires and crimping doesn't so it is possible for corrosion to reduce the effectiveness over time. Soldered joints need to be supported where the flexible wire meets the rigid joint as this is where breaks occur. A good piece of quality heat shrink will resolve this problem. Soldering is unavoidable if your equipment requires a 9 or 15 pin Dsub connector or in the case of my Dynon a 25 pin connector.

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Radios are now a bit of a issue ..they are all getting a lot more expensive. Especially since the 8.33 khz spacing has been ratified and introduced. Certification of these new radios both by the radio authorites and aircraft overlords make the cost more.

 

Any of the big guys like Trig , Garmin, Becker etc are all pretty good but always have been very expensive and that hasnt changed. Cheaper radios like Xcom and Microair will now be pretty much gone.

 

The next radio I am going to get is the MGL V16 to go into my Rans S-21. It is a very different design internally..its not like a "normal" radio design. Its relatively cheap too. There was a few complaints about engine noise coming through in the early ones but I think they may have sorted that

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A good soldered joint bonds the 2 wires and crimping doesn't so it is possible for corrosion to reduce the effectiveness over time. Soldered joints need to be supported where the flexible wire meets the rigid joint as this is where breaks occur. A good piece of quality heat shrink will resolve this problem. Soldering is unavoidable if your equipment requires a 9 or 15 pin Dsub connector or in the case of my Dynon a 25 pin connector.

Crimping is not subject to corrosion. Yes the cheap plier type crimpers are useless and never should be used. Proper crimping with the correct tools is a galvanic bond that lasts the test of time. Look, at a distance, at the high tension power lines on those large towers that criss cross this country. They have already lasted around 50 years, each crimped not welded! The are crimped using hydraulic machinery.

No aircraft manufacture of GA aircraft will deliver an aircraft with soldered wires.

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No aircraft manufacture of GA aircraft will deliver an aircraft with soldered wires.

There shouldn't be any in an RA aircraft either but any of the glass cockpit and computer equipment will have D Subs or 25 pin connectors and the wires are all soldered to the pins.

 

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Soldering is fine...you just make sure each joint is heatshrinked over the pin back and the wire..it is the strain releif. It wont break but left open yes there is a possibility

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Radios are now a bit of a issue ..they are all getting a lot more expensive. Especially since the 8.33 khz spacing has been ratified and introduced. Certification of these new radios both by the radio authorites and aircraft overlords make the cost more.

 

Any of the big guys like Trig , Garmin, Becker etc are all pretty good but always have been very expensive and that hasnt changed. Cheaper radios like Xcom and Microair will now be pretty much gone.

 

The next radio I am going to get is the MGL V16 to go into my Rans S-21. It is a very different design internally..its not like a "normal" radio design. Its relatively cheap too. There was a few complaints about engine noise coming through in the early ones but I think they may have sorted that

 

 

 

I would be very surprised if in a not-so-populated country Australia and/or New Zealand they would use all these extra 'channels'. There is also the problems of the many aircraft with legacy transceivers not being able to access the new channels should they become available for use Down Under.

 

What would be the problem with sticking with the original frequency spacing and buying a radio accordingly?

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You will find there wont be any new non 8.33 khz radios in the market. Australia wouldnt have the need for it as usual its a "thing" in Europe//they just cant help themselves over there. You see all this stuff all the time in the radio industry then when you add the multiplyer of aircraft its turns into a empty wallet for no great advantage

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I would be very surprised if in a not-so-populated country Australia and/or New Zealand they would use all these extra 'channels'. There is also the problems of the many aircraft with legacy transceivers not being able to access the new channels should they become available for use Down Under.

 

What would be the problem with sticking with the original frequency spacing and buying a radio accordingly?

The aussie/NZ market is a drop in the ocean for a worldwide mfg. They won't be producing a radio just for us.

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nah..trichlorethylene :) it is awesome far better than isop

 

Thats the stuff. I couldnt remember its name but i remember it now but there was NO way i could spell it !

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Trichloroethylene is banned from many products and workshops today, due to its carcinogenic properties. There's better products available today, such as GenTech solvent.

TCE is particularly bad for the environment, and poses a major problem as regards disposal.

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I know that..I was surprised I could get some to be honest. I use it all the time obviously as thats what I do..make circuit boards and develop electronics for the company I work for. But I take the necessary precautions. I have tried all the other stuff and its not a patch on trichlor. When I was a apprentice in the electrical distribution industry there was none of this MDS and OH&S..we used to almost bath in Carbontetrachloride and trichlor...fantastic cleaners. No one knew all about the dangers of it. The one thing you have to remember is governments legislate for the lowest common denominator...in other words the dumb arse in society. Now we know all about how these chemicals work and what they can do its fine to use them provided you take the necessary precautions and be sensible.....the issue now days is more than 60% of the population has had "common sense" bred out of them

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