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Aircraft Maintenance Logbook Review Service


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Hey all,

 

I hope everyone is well.

 

So I get an email (as you all probably did) from RAA announcing an Aircraft Maintenance Logbook Review Service and thought, hmm... I have only owned the bird for 3 years, this might be a good idea to make sure my logs are up to date with what is needed. SBs etc etc. So I signed up, but maybe my expectations were somewhere else. 27 pages of links to everything from CASA regs, Rotax SBs, and stacks of other stuff. Lots of noise that I guess I now need to sift through to find bits that matter to me.

 

Anyone else uses this service?

 

PS - There is an encouragement to join up to Breezy Log, so would also be interested if anyone uses that too!

 

Cheers

J

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I use the full Breezylog system & I'm very glad I do. If you have a used aircraft, as I do, the initial setup is long & laborious. However the people at Breezy are really helpful & patient & committed to getting a newbie onto the system. I can't speak highly enough of the support.

 

I was amazed at the number of Service Bulletins, Airworthiness Directives etc that had been issued over the 5 year life of my aircraft, for the Rotax, airframe, chute & instruments. The Breezy system initially produces pages of lists of these issues that you have to work thru yourself, to decide which apply to your setup. Some of these you may have to get guidance from whoever does your maintenance, L2, LAME etc. Each item on the list has a link next to it, so it's just a click to the document that the item refers to, then you have to read each & decide if it applies to you.

 

When you submit the list back to Breezy, annotated with your comments, they then load that into the system. Once you're up & running, the system then enables anyone connected with the aircraft to logon & see all the completed, outstanding & upcoming maintenance items, all noted with either hours to run or time & date expiry.

 

You have to have the discipline to log on & off the system at the start & finish of each flight, to keep the system log accurate. This process can also then produce your personal flying log too.

 

When maintenance is due, the system can produce a worksheet of the work needed & as the work is completed, it's signed off & automatically updates the records with the new due date/time.

 

New SBs, ADs etc are auto added to your record for you to check their applicability.

 

Administrative items can also be added, such as dates for BFR, ASIC, RAA, AVMED, Insurance etc.

 

As an ex RAAF tech I was surprised when I started out in the RAA world at the standard of quality & extent of record keeping, compared to what I was used to in the military. The Breezy system isn't anywhere close to the military system, neither does it need to be. However, it is a huge step forward in maintaining records & improving safety, compared to much I've seen in the RAA world.

 

As a bonus, think what it will do for the resale value of your aircraft if you can produce detailed, comprehensive maintenance records, supporting your claims about your wonderful aircraft to a prospective buyer!

 

Of course, Breezylog, or any other system, paper or computer, will only be a reflection of the owners attitude towards maintenance & record keeping. If you're the type that's interested in this stuff, Breezylog is a welcome tool. If that's not you, save your money.

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Thanks for the input.

 

The only question I have with systems like this, where the data is quite valuable, is what happens 4 or 5 years from now, if the company goes broke. COVID has shown us that ANY company, no matter how big or small, can be vulnerable.

 

I am not fore or against - just thinking out loud.

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Good question - or if you decide you don't want to use it anymore, or your prospective purchaser doesn't want to use it. I am currently developing some online software to automate admin overhead for aircraft syndicates, as well as an EASA compliant digital log book and a few other things. One of my later plans was a simple a/c tech log - not quite as comprehensive as Breezy Log - but it is intended to be free.. with the ability to upload or download all of the syndicate or personal data at any time or come and go as you please. I can see the benefit of the Breezy Log solution and noted on their web site that they are looking to develop for FAA and EASA markets.. The record keeping requirements for EASA under Part M are crazy and cost us about £800 or so of our annual maintenance bill. Part M lite was introduced and to be honest I am not sure what has changed in terms of record keeping, but a LAME llosing a decent chunk of their fees in an annual based purely on hours of work may not be terribly happy.

 

I couldn't see anything on their web site that mentioned the portability of your data.. But I am sure they have something to protect you in the case of bankruptcy at the very least.. May be worth checking with them as it looks a very comprehensive solution for not a lot of money in the scheme of things

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Thanks for the input.

 

The only question I have with systems like this, where the data is quite valuable, is what happens 4 or 5 years from now, if the company goes broke. COVID has shown us that ANY company, no matter how big or small, can be vulnerable.

 

I am not fore or against - just thinking out loud.

That's a fair question, a good reminder to keep paper copies of all reports & schedules so at least you can transfer 'up to date' records to a new, manual or computer system. One thing I didn't mention in my previous response, the system is web based, so you can log into it with any type of phone, tablet or desktop. The fees for the full system, from my foggy memory, were about $500 for initial setup & $22 per month. The amount of work Breezylog had to do to get my records up was really substantial, although it is a lot of $ they worked really hard for it.

 

Companies don't have to go broke to let down users, look at what Yahoo has done to the millions of people who were using Yahoo Groups.

 

Jerry A, that's a good point about ongoing support in the event of business failure & I'll ask them. I'm glad to hear that others, like you, are developing systems too. Having a number of competing systems will be good for users & should, over time, lift everybody's game.

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Thanks for the input.

 

The only question I have with systems like this, where the data is quite valuable, is what happens 4 or 5 years from now, if the company goes broke. COVID has shown us that ANY company, no matter how big or small, can be vulnerable.

 

I am not fore or against - just thinking out loud.

Hey BirdDog. Understand your concern. No one wants to go broke but as you said, big or small all can fall. BreezyLog allows the user with the click of 1 button to download the entire Aircraft Records including ADs, in a .pdf in a format that is compliant with CAO 100.5(3). You can do this as many times and as often as you like and store the file as your own back-up.

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Good question - or if you decide you don't want to use it anymore, or your prospective purchaser doesn't want to use it. I am currently developing some online software to automate admin overhead for aircraft syndicates, as well as an EASA compliant digital log book and a few other things. One of my later plans was a simple a/c tech log - not quite as comprehensive as Breezy Log - but it is intended to be free.. with the ability to upload or download all of the syndicate or personal data at any time or come and go as you please. I can see the benefit of the Breezy Log solution and noted on their web site that they are looking to develop for FAA and EASA markets.. The record keeping requirements for EASA under Part M are crazy and cost us about £800 or so of our annual maintenance bill. Part M lite was introduced and to be honest I am not sure what has changed in terms of record keeping, but a LAME llosing a decent chunk of their fees in an annual based purely on hours of work may not be terribly happy.

 

I couldn't see anything on their web site that mentioned the portability of your data.. But I am sure they have something to protect you in the case of bankruptcy at the very least.. May be worth checking with them as it looks a very comprehensive solution for not a lot of money in the scheme of things

Hi Jerry_A. Cool. EASA is an interesting animal for sure. BreezyLog allows any pilot to download the details of any aircraft they have flown (that is on the BreezyLog system). As you would be aware, software development is a living animal and takes up many nights. As a LAME myself, I wanted BreezyLog to alert the owners LAME (maintainer) to what is coming up. As the pilot enters their flight information in "Real Time" on their phone or tablet, when a scheduled maintenance task gets within 20%, an email is sent to the owner and any authorised maintainer alerting of the impending maintenance task.

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Welcome to the forums, @BreezyLog .. Given users can get their data at any time, your product should be a hit.

 

Interested to know what tech stack you used to develop and deploy BreezyLog. I am using Java with a Postges DB.. Postgres good; Java bad... It really ius carp - don't know how a whole industry fell for it like they did.. Should read the Python books (or go back to COBOL! ;-))

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