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Stick or yolk. Whats your thing?


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Hi folks

 

When i first started flying ultralights (or what we now call LSA/recreational aircraft) it was not common to see these equipped with a yolk. Nobody talked about 'yolk and rudder flying'. However, now I notice that increasing numbers of LSAs come with fitted yolks to control roll and pitch. I have flown aircraft with yolks and find them quite different from sticks.

 

My question is... What do you prefer? What do you consider the major differences between both control mechanisms and the relative advantages or disadvantages of each?

 

Cheers

 

Alan

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The yolks that double as a second stick don't count. Victa had that. Normal joysticks in the floor are hard to get past when you are getting in and out.

For my own personal plane 2 seat I prefer tandem and joystick with engine controls on the left side. IF you have more than1 engine you need a console. Some have them in the roof. (not as good) and some do duplicated in the dash. (Awful) Cessna's yolk on a stalk coming out of the dash makes it easier to move around but I wouldn't fancy it as an aerobatic layout.. It's a bit clumsy for the precise aileron work and your knees get in the way. In U/L's cost and weight and strength make some dual layouts difficult to engineer.. Nev

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If you want to feel one with the plane, stick/throttle L/H side, you want to drive a couch, control column?

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I think it comes down to more than just stick or yoke. I can use both nowdays with ease but it was not always that way. I learnt on Cessnas but once getting my PPL I did my tailwheel endorsement in a Decathlon. I am a left hander and the problem for me was not the yoke to stick change over...it was the change of throttle/ flight controls to opposite hands! I tended to over do the elevator response until I developed the muscle memory in my right arm when flying the Decathlon.

Wayne

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Having more rotary-wing than fixed-wing hours I can honestly say I need a stick in my right hand!!!

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If we are talking about it, it's a Yoke which comes from.........

 

[ATTACH type=full" alt="WDYoke.JPG]53551[/ATTACH]

You are over-egging your answer.

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This is getting past a yolk. I was wondering why no-one was getting egged on.

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Most of my flying was with yoke aircraft and centre throttle/mixture/prop, but I did a bit of stick time in a Skyfox (I think it was) for a tailwheel endorsement. I don't mind either, but agree with the point above that legs don't get tangled up with a yoke when getting in/out., which is a plus for yokes. I don't like the idea of a centre stick (between seats), because it can only be used with one hand and I like to be able to use either for the flight controls. I've never flown a tandem or single-seater with stick and throttle each side, but intellectually that does have some appeal. It might depend on where everything else was though, i.e. things like flaps/gear/radio switches that need regular access.

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When I first drove a 'bus' I thought it's a bit of a gimmick but after a while the side stick was the most natural form of A/C control with the best ergonomics?

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Learnt with a yoke but much prefer the stick. Was unsure how I would adapt to the stick, but it's very intuitive and direct.

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When I first drove a 'bus' I thought it's a bit of a gimmick but after a while the side stick was the most natural form of A/C control with the best ergonomics?

I have never used a side stick but my project involves one. Maybe a mistake. I have been wondering about the requirements for control force verses pilot g force. I have assumed that the stick force should be less than for a centre long stick, am I wrong. The design is for me to be recumbent, should that influence anything of the control situation?

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Having more rotary-wing than fixed-wing hours I can honestly say I need a stick in my right hand!!!

Chopper pilots have to have one in bothhands ?

 

Stick feels more natural but if your flying who cares, stick or yolk, left, right or centre.

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Totally agree with the comments about side sticks. Likewise I thought them a gimmick but now prefer them. Flying a Canard where PIOs easily occur, the side stick helps manage the situation. Also, they help manage fatigue over long trips.

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The sidestick is not operating the controls directly. It's inputs are modified by microprocessors and it's got no equivalence in U/L's .

IF you are R or L handed, you will have trouble changing seats in a two crew cockpit or if you are instructing from the RH seat. The sidestick lets you get your lunch tray in front of you easier. Nev

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The sidestick is not operating the controls directly. It's inputs are modified by microprocessors and it's got no equivalence in U/L's .

IF you are R or L handed, you will have trouble changing seats in a two crew cockpit or if you are instructing from the RH seat. The sidestick lets you get your lunch tray in front of you easier. Nev

Well you better tell that to the Cirrus owners, the Long Eze owners and other side stick machines! It's the position of the side stick not the FBW technology behind it that we are talking about here! Never had any trouble Lor R!

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I thought we were talking about the BUS. Having trouble L to R is an individual thing and some have mentioned it in their posts. How you and I cope is relevant to US.. There are times you steady the stick with both hands or change hands or against your leg.. You don't have that option with sidestick. The thread title is what's your "thing" . I want a substantial CONTROL column that I can get at and apply larger than normal forces, IF that's needed.. Everyone's entitled to their opinion. That's wat the question was. Nev

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What is the feedback force of a sidestick. I know the force per g for stick and yoke, but not sidestick. I am designing my aircraft to be able to adjust this force through a huge range. It would be nice to know around now ( designing the trim systems)

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I thought we were talking about the BUS. Having trouble L to R is an individual thing and some have mentioned it in their posts. How you and I cope is relevant to US.. There are times you steady the stick with both hands or change hands or against your leg.. You don't have that option with sidestick. The thread title is what's your "thing" . I want a substantial CONTROL column that I can get at and apply larger than normal forces, IF that's needed.. Everyone's entitled to their opinion. That's wat the question was. Nev

Oh brother,?

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What is the feedback force of a sidestick. I know the force per g for stick and yoke, but not sidestick. I am designing my aircraft to be able to adjust this force through a huge range. It would be nice to know around now ( designing the trim systems)

Manual control is all about leverage.

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Yes but the FAA dictate that you must have to use a given force for a g pulled on the aircraft. So you don't accidentally pull 12g etc. Is that requirement still the same for a sidestick where you have significantly less movement.

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Yes but the FAA dictate that you must have to use a given force for a g pulled on the aircraft. So you don't accidentally pull 12g etc. Is that requirement still the same for a sidestick where you have significantly less movement.

It's about leverage, geometry mechanical advantage and control surface size etc.The average stick size in most of yr +6g machines is around 2ft long, in order not to pull +12g which would be near impossble for the average light A/C and pilot to endure the stick would not work for the size of a Std human being?

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A lot of that is about balance, stability and overbalanced control. NO control must pull itself into more control movement. That's definitely a no no. The area in front of the hinge and the longitudinal dihedral affect stability . Nev

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