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RAA BFR - does a GA rating qualify


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My friend is a lapsed RAA pilot (sorta like a lapsed Catholic, I think), but is a current CPL.

 

She wants to renew her RA certificate, but apparently a RAA BFR is required.

Does a newly minted GA rating meet the RAA's BFR requirements?

 

Cheers

Gerry

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No expert but I would say both YES & No.

 

Yes - the GA license & rating are recognised by RAA and will be transferred to the RAA Certificate eg constant speed propeller and retractable undercarriage.

No - GA/ATPL/CPL pilots must do a conversion to RAA - I think it is a minimum of 5 hours. From my own experience, it took a lot of effort on my part to get myself "acclimatise" to low inertia aircraft. Someone with glider experience/training might make the transition more easily.

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For a renewal, she needs to be financial and show the RAA her GA bfr....that's it.

For a RAA conversion she needs to do time with an Raa instructor.

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The GA BFR covers all but the categories unique and specific to RAAus like two stroke and low inertia, as examples. ( presuming we are dealing with BFR's). Nev

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Have you looked at the RAAus Ops manual?

A GA AFR satisfies the RAAus AFR requirement only if it is completed in a single engine aeroplane with a MTOW less than 1500kgs.

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The GA one I used at the time (My own) was under that weight so It didn't register with me as an issue but obviously can be. Nev

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I have had a BFR accepted even though the MTOW was above 150lbs.

You still have to have an RAAus pilots certificate and be a member of RAAus to fly an RAAQus reg plane.

The medical and BFR from GA will suffice for medical and BFR for RAAus.

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Thanks guys.

She has/had an RAA ceertificate (learnt in my Jabiru, actually)

 

The RAA Ops Manual is more than a little unclear about what GA ratings would be valid.

But, I guess showing RAA the GA BFR in her log book is good advice - I'll let her know.

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All very interesting - having a "lapsed" RAA membership & Cert will likely mean that the pilot will need to demonstrate some currency/recent competence in RAA aircraft befor being "given the keys". This is usually done by obtaining a recent BFR in type/category.

I think it unlikely that the pilot can present to a RAA environment, with a GA BFR, and be accepted as is.

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I think it unlikely that the pilot can present to a RAA environment, with a GA BFR, and be accepted as is

 

Correct. In the event that their GA BFR is 'current', they still need to meet 90 day currency requirements on the different type. An RAAus owner would be very brave to just hand a GA pilot the keys and let them regain their currency. I'd require a check flight with them to assess their real life competency.

 

happy days,

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My friend is a lapsed RAA pilot (sorta like a lapsed Catholic, I think), but is a current CPL.

 

She wants to renew her RA certificate, but apparently a RAA BFR is required.

Does a newly minted GA rating meet the RAA's BFR requirements?

 

The RAA Ops Manual is more than a little unclear about what GA ratings would be valid.

But, I guess showing RAA the GA BFR in her log book is good advice - I'll let her know.

Not at all, it is quite clear, you just need to know where to look...

 

Short answer, yes, if it was for the issue of a:

CSU

Tailwheel

Retractable

Float

Floating hull or

Controlled airspace endorsement or

a flight test for the initial issue of an RPL/PPL/CPL. Reference is RAAus Ops Manual Section 2.07 Chapter 5(f)i-vi.

 

Have you looked at the RAAus Ops manual?

A GA AFR satisfies the RAAus AFR requirement only if it is completed in a single engine aeroplane with a MTOW less than 1500kgs.

And here's the curious thing - for the issue of any of the above endorsements, you do not need to be in an aircraft under 1,500Kg. You could do your retract endorsement on a Baron or Twinkie and it would still meet the requirements, but if you do a GA AFR then it must be in an aircraft under 1,500Kg...
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The whole thing is nuts! I used to jump from heavy metal into RA into GA into experimental all the time, I fail to see the big deal?

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The whole thing is nuts! I used to jump from heavy metal into RA into GA into experimental all the time, I fail to see the big deal?

No big deal - if your qualifications/experience are being recognised - go for it.

 

I think out opening question was basically, is there recognition , from GA qualifications to/by RAA, the answer is clearely yes, for endorsements and possibly for recency (BFR) but that may or not satisfy a rental situation if the GA pilots experiencing, in low inertia aircraft, is historic rather than recent.

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Recency for Hire situations would be likely required on something similar. THAT's up to the person arranging the hiring. If anyone just walks in off the street very few are just going to toss the keys at you.. Some people have experience that is quite limited not only to a type but even a locality. The more experienced you are over a wide performance spectrum the more likely you are to have little difficulty in swapping around.. It's pretty hard to GUARANTEE some little thing that's different won't catch you out.. You certainly won't be able to find all controls and switches in the dark like you will if you fly one type and particular PLANE constantly for a year or so where the opposite can happen .You get TOO Blase. and cut corners. No checks etc. Nev

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ok - a very recent aerobatics rating/endorsement, and a recent GA instructors rating - would that suffice, do you think?

Assuming you already hold a RAA Pilot Cert. The whole point is, that you must hold the RAA Cert to fly an RAA Airplane no matter what your GA qualifications are which I found out when I converted to RAA.

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Didn't someone fly a RAA aircraft with just a PPL?

Rumour is the RAA initiated court proceedings but quietly dropped the case and swept it under the carpet.

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ok - a very recent aerobatics rating/endorsement, and a recent GA instructors rating - would that suffice, do you think?
I don't want to come across as an angry prick, but you've been provided a reference to where that answer can be found in the RAAus Ops manual and a hyperlink to the manual for you to review...Have you looked over the RAAus Ops manual yourself to try to find the answer?

 

If a Pilot Certificate holder has within a period of two years immediately preceding the proposed flight, passed a flight test for the issue of a CASA Recreational Pilot Licence or higher, or the initial issue of a single engine CASA licence, rating or endorsement, then the pilot is taken to have satisfactorily completed a recreational aeroplane flight review on the date of the flight test.
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Assuming you already hold a RAA Pilot Cert. The whole point is, that you must hold the RAA Cert to fly an RAA Airplane no matter what your GA qualifications are which I found out when I converted to RAA.

No, the whole point is about wanting to renew a LAPSED RAA certificate, and what GA ratings/endorsements would be sufficient in place of a RAA BFR to renew said RAA certificate.

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Jesus Christ - OK lets stop the merry go-round.

If you are able to fly a GA aircraft today legally - you can fly a RAA aircraft with a RAA pilot cert. No other BS required. Just bring your GA logbook that's says you are current with a GA BFR. You do not need to do a RAA BFR.

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No, the whole point is about wanting to renew a LAPSED RAA certificate, and what GA ratings/endorsements would be sufficient in place of a RAA BFR to renew said RAA certificate.

Ok why not just ring RAA for the answer.

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Jesus Christ - OK lets stop the merry go-round.

If you are able to fly a GA aircraft today legally - you can fly a RAA aircraft with a RAA pilot cert. No other BS required. Just bring your GA logbook that's says you are current with a GA BFR. You do not need to do a RAA BFR.

Correct!!

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