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Taiwan typical accident report. I’m starting to fly here so thought it best to take a look!


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Ignore the English.....I’m trying to improve Chinese so I understand the problems there.

 

I’m paragliding and looking for ultralight airports so thought I’d check the accident reports. If the first one didn’t involve injury the idea of crashing on a pineapple farm would be more amusing. The standards here are interesting. Lots of bravado. The guys definitely push the limits.

 

1. On Feb. 3 1155 Hrs (Local Time), a Quick Silver Sport 2S twin seat ultra light aircraft, took off from Jhong-Pu private ultra light airfield. During the initial climbing, the operator loss of control the aircraft with full power flight into terrain, the aircraft was rest on the pineapple orchard, which was located at 100 meters north west of the airfield. The aircraft was substantial damaged, the operator was suffered the serious injury. 

 

2.

The two operators in the occurrence were all members of legal ultra-light vehicle activity association and held valid operation certificates issued by the Civil Aeronautics Administration, Ministry of Transportation and Communications (hereinafter CAA). However, the vehicle was designed and built by an individual and did not hold a valid inspection certificate issued by the CAA. Furthermore, the vehicle did not take off from a legal site. As a result, the operation was an illegal ultra-light vehicle activity.

The contributing factors preclude weather, fuselage structure and flight control system related factors. The occurrence vehicle experienced engine rotational speed decrease and subsequent decrease of output horsepower during cruise, which resulted in the flight altitude of vehicle could not be maintained, therefore, the operators executed emergency landing, causing the vehicle destroyed. The two operators were no injuries. Due to severe damage to the engine, relevant functional tests could not be performed. Therefore, exact causes of insufficient engine horsepower could not be determined.

The CAA has stipulated relevant provisions for inspection and issuance of certificate of ultra-light vehicle designed and built by individuals or manufacturers. However, up to the present, there is no application case. The CAA may go deep into the realities to find out the reasons, enhance the dissemination of relevant procedures and regulations, and provide guidance to intended applicants.

 

 

https://www.ttsb.gov.tw/media/3241/0311storch-executive-summarypdf.pdf

Edited by Mike Gearon
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Could have all been said in 2 short sentences but the main anomaly is they say it crashed at full power & then the cause was a loss of engine power. Weird.

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I think it's two issues.. The translation must be allowed for. If you spend enough time going over it a few times it makes a lot more sense. Taiwan does things fairly OK with inhabited flying objects. though I'm not sure about the smaller ones. Nev

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Ignore the English.....I’m trying to improve Chinese so I understand the problems there.

 

I’m paragliding and looking for ultralight airports so thought I’d check the accident reports. If the first one didn’t involve injury the idea of crashing on a pineapple farm would be more amusing. The standards here are interesting. Lots of bravado. The guys definitely push the limits.

 

1. On Feb. 3 1155 Hrs (Local Time), a Quick Silver Sport 2S twin seat ultra light aircraft, took off from Jhong-Pu private ultra light airfield. During the initial climbing, the operator loss of control the aircraft with full power flight into terrain, the aircraft was rest on the pineapple orchard, which was located at 100 meters north west of the airfield. The aircraft was substantial damaged, the operator was suffered the serious injury. 

 

2.

The two operators in the occurrence were all members of legal ultra-light vehicle activity association and held valid operation certificates issued by the Civil Aeronautics Administration, Ministry of Transportation and Communications (hereinafter CAA). However, the vehicle was designed and built by an individual and did not hold a valid inspection certificate issued by the CAA. Furthermore, the vehicle did not take off from a legal site. As a result, the operation was an illegal ultra-light vehicle activity.

The contributing factors preclude weather, fuselage structure and flight control system related factors. The occurrence vehicle experienced engine rotational speed decrease and subsequent decrease of output horsepower during cruise, which resulted in the flight altitude of vehicle could not be maintained, therefore, the operators executed emergency landing, causing the vehicle destroyed. The two operators were no injuries. Due to severe damage to the engine, relevant functional tests could not be performed. Therefore, exact causes of insufficient engine horsepower could not be determined.

The CAA has stipulated relevant provisions for inspection and issuance of certificate of ultra-light vehicle designed and built by individuals or manufacturers. However, up to the present, there is no application case. The CAA may go deep into the realities to find out the reasons, enhance the dissemination of relevant procedures and regulations, and provide guidance to intended applicants.

 

 

https://www.ttsb.gov.tw/media/3241/0311storch-executive-summarypdf.pdf

I've done business with several Taiwanese companies in the past. Never mind the English, they try hard and are very genuine people.

The event they describe has been matched here in Australia many times; routine EFATO, should have been able to glide to at least a landing with gear breakages at worst, but they hadn't checked the circuit or simply fell for the self-assurance of referring to "Tiger Country" where you don't land, or even just pulled the stick back and dropped it like a rock from anywhere up to 1000 feet, so sound like nothing we haven't done here.

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It probably went something like this, high drag low inertia, not suitable for stunned mullets.

Skip to 7.00 for the crash.

 

Very long story short:

Engine seized due to incorrect fitting of pipe to top only of coolant expansion bottle, so air not coolant drawn back in each time engine cooled. Minor leaks around pump then gradually reduced remaining coolant in engine.

Aircraft written off because pilot didn't do anything to get nose down when noise stopped.

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It probably went something like this, high drag low inertia, not suitable for stunned mullets.

Skip to 7.00 for the crash.

 

Check out the final analysis these two should never have been allowed to fly anything. But they managed to write off the aircraft through the combination of no maintainence mechanical ignorance and no flying skill Is it any wonder we get shit on by regulators.

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I've done business with several Taiwanese companies in the past. Never mind the English, they try hard and are very genuine people.

The event they describe has been matched here in Australia many times; routine EFATO, should have been able to glide to at least a landing with gear breakages at worst, but they hadn't checked the circuit or simply fell for the self-assurance of referring to "Tiger Country" where you don't land, or even just pulled the stick back and dropped it like a rock from anywhere up to 1000 feet, so sound like nothing we haven't done here.

I’m glad. They are some of my favourite people. I even had my own one for 8 years. Exactly as you’ve written. Genuine and try really hard.

 

I have just been messaged that my next tandem paragliding flight MUST then follow with a solo. Not sure what to make of that.

 

I have two cracked ribs from a failed tandem takeoff into a weather system. I said to instructor on way up mountain I’d not fly a plane in this weather. He helpfully told me planes can fly in much worse weather than paragliders. We lifted then the wing furled and we dropped 2 meters. Ribs happened when were turned 360 degrees sideways.

 

We then recovered and took off.

 

We then had to spiral dive to avoid the rain coming at us. 3G turns. The paragliders can’t deal with extra weight of rain and the rain drop disturbed surface of aerofoil. We landed wet.

 

I now understand why we flew. This is plum rain season. Almost always towering cumulous and we’d not fly often if ultra cautious.

 

if there aren’t any more posts it’ll be obvious the solo didn’t go so well.

 

looking into the LSR flying here. Bit like the wildwest and my Phillipines flying. She’ll be right.

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Re the Quicksilver.. Bad height to have it happen. IF you are on a minimum climb out speed more so. As that engine was winding down the nose should have been being lowered. Risk is you get a very high sink rate requiring a more deliberate flare to arrest it, and if the speed is low nothing happens. They had a high sink rate right to contact. I've had mates years ago get severe spinal injuries just like that. The wheels spread and the seat has no buffer when the runway is hit. I think that one was still nose down. The way it's recorded doesn't give a lot of indication of Pitch. Nev

Sorry folks this should have been posted a day ago. I get tooo any phone calls.

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