Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I didn''t see HIM is a weak excuse. It's usually because you don't look. Like the Garuda 707? who not only didn't hold clear but crossed the runway at the western threshold of 06 at Sydney when I was on late final. About 60 ft vertical separation as I went round. Must have been a premonition as I said to the crew near Bindook. "This BLOKE is going to get in OUR way somehow" and I was sort of ready for it when it happened.. Nev

YSSY must have moved that Rwy10 degs???

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 58
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Where an Instructor starts a sessions with "Today we're going to practice some EFATOs" you're primed and ready for as many as it takes and you're paying hourly rate for no benefit.

It HAS to be unexpected (and the instructor has to be ready for a fail.

The three or four seconds you talked about is recognised in a lot of industries as a failure to react subconsciously.

The Reaction Time the study talks about, and I was talking about was reaction time to a subconscious response. Once you cross that point and start to think "Is the engine really stopping?" etc. you not only go into the 2 - 3 second response, but I've actually taken several seconds to get my act together pikcing the wrong response a couple of times into the bargain. I don't think I would ever do that with an EFATO because I was lucky enough to have an Instructor who explained "The instant the engine slows, nose down, trim to 70 kts, THEN follow the other checks" and proceeded to pull the throttle back from above the strip all the way out to the training area, and the nose down became a subconscious action.

Reacting subconciously usually occurs before shock, with shock hitting as the enormity of what's about to happen sinks in. I think in most cases, such as an engine failure from altitude, the check list keeps you busy, but I know from racing that at times you can react well, and at other times fear is the top emotion.

I think that possibly it goes back further than engine failure training. If you are taught to maintain your airspeed then it is instinctive and regardless of power settings or lack thereof you subconsciously adjust your attitude to maintain the proper airspeed without having to think about it.

 

Part of trouble with when you're doing it with an instructor I found was that when the power was pulled, I knew what I would do, and where I was going, but you're not sure if that's what they wanted you to do.

Link to post
Share on other sites

YSSY must have moved that Rwy10 degs???

Who cares? Us Trolly Dollys could always look it up if we wanted to.

He's talking from memory; I'd rather hear the story from a pilot who forgot the coordinates after 30 years.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that possibly it goes back further than engine failure training. If you are taught to maintain your airspeed then it is instinctive and regardless of power settings or lack thereof you subconsciously adjust your attitude to maintain the proper airspeed without having to think about it.

Part of trouble with when you're doing it with an instructor I found was that when the power was pulled, I knew what I would do, and where I was going, but you're not sure if that's what they wanted you to do.

If you can guarantee subconscious action, yes different methods don't matter. The key point is that first the aircraft glides, then you pick your roof.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Haste has killed as well with engine failures. Don't rush! The plane won't instantly fall out of the sky!

In a high drag Recreational Aircraft in a climb attitude you're not going to be looking for a thermal. We have a history of undamaged aircraft falling out of the sky.

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can guarantee subconscious action, yes different methods don't matter. The key point is that first the aircraft glides, then you pick your roof.

Roof? If it's covered in roof, I'm not going there. I like to have my paddock chosen before the event.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Haste has killed as well with engine failures. Don't rush! The plane won't instantly fall out of the sky!

Seems we sometime get a driver that thinks if they keep pulling back they can stay up there forever.

In a high drag Recreational Aircraft in a climb attitude you're not going to be looking for a thermal. We have a history of undamaged aircraft falling out of the sky.

It's not uncommon around here the get thermals that will reduce your sink rate from 600fpm to zero, sometimes even a Drifter will gain altitude.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems that some pilots do not understand how to read glass cockpit indications. I have two Dynon Skyview displays and set them up with one showing flight instruments and navigation data and the other engine instruments. Let's deal with the engine one first.

Each gauge has colour (green, amber, red) A quick glance can tell you if all gauges are in the green. No need to read that actual numbers, they are in the acceptable limit.

RPM and Manifold pressure are of interest numberwise when changing the throttle position. Therefore these dials can be made larger that the rest and grouped together at the top left corner of the display - the first think that the eye usually looks at.

There are two ways to adjust the throttle setting, watch the numbers change or move the throttle and wait and see what the resulting RPM is. The first method means eyes in the cockpit, the second means eyes can be out of the cockpit. Therefore always use the second method. The same applies to flying the aircraft. I want to make a 30 degree banked turn. Apply aileron until you think the aircraft has 30 degrees, now take a quick glance in the cockpit and adjust if necessary. Eyes are out side the cockpit most of the time.

The flight instruments initially take a while to get use to and need reading the numbers. Once set, let's say in the cruise all you should be looking for is changes in speed not the actual speed itself. Any change would be because the nose has been lifted or dropped and throttle movement is not necessary. The altitude gauge should show a rate of climb or descent and take note of this rather tha the exact height. Likewise, the heading you have set may change if your wings are not level. Most glass instruments have bugs that can be set, and usually will be set at the top of the compass rose. If the bug moves, move it back again. Once again you can watch it change as you manoeuvre or you can guess the amount of change and the correct the result if not spot on.

From what is stated above there is a way to fly with your eye outside the cockpit and looking at changes to glass instruments rather than harping on the actual numbers.

Give it a try and happy flying.

  • Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...