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The latest notice from CASA regarding registered and certified airfields says, ”Carriage and use of radio is mandatory at registered and certified airfields” That being the case why do at least 50% and probably more of the arrivals/departures from Warwick (YWCK) not use them?70F9AD76-50FD-45A4-933D-EB9D21616C6E.thumb.png.e63d32808760e473d73337b033c4d3c2.png

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Were does That leave all the 95-10 aircraft without electronics. No radio means GROUNDED ?

spacesailor

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Were does That leave all the 95-10 aircraft without electronics. No radio means GROUNDED ?

spacesailor

Guessing they will have to use hand held? Gliders manage!

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On 13 Aug, those aerstrips which are registered will be called certified and will require radio. Until then they are registered and do not require radio, but if you have radio you must use it.

Those such as YIVG, my home strip are not registered or certified at this time and i am assuming that it will stay that way, but as we all have and use radio it doesn't matter. What does matter is all the airstrips, such as YMIM Miriam vale which are on the charts and haven't existed for years. As it stands at the moment we should listen and advise our progress on 126.7 when we are near places like that and in the meantime cannot necessarily be listening on area frequency. This means two or more aircraft could be close together on different frequencies.

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I wouldn't fly in any Airspace without 2way Comms, just too dangerous for my liking! Radio should be mandatory in any machine that leaves the groundM

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South Grafton (YSGR) is not registered or certified but we have it listed in ERSA. A condition of use is the carriage and use of radios and this is specified in our ERSA page.

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I wouldn't fly in any Airspace without 2way Comms, just too dangerous for my liking! Radio should be mandatory in any machine that leaves the groundM

 

It does seem ridiculous that nowadays a person almost has to have a mobile phone implanted in their body before they leave the house, yet many will happily go gadding about the skies in any direction and at any altitude without carrying a radio. "See, and be Seen"? Maybe also, "Hear, and be Heard".

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Maybe they are just scared about mucking up their call's

-no radio, means no mistakes :roflmao:

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Maybe they are just scared about mucking up their call's

 

Or they could be like infants and learn how to say things by listening to others.

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Having a radio is no guarantee that you will be safe. At my home strip we have aircraft flying on area frequency, because they do not even know that the strip is there. When you fly cross country are you looking for all those strips near your route and changing frequency to listen to all of them, or do you listen to area frequency to stay safe and informed?

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<<do you listen to area frequency to stay safe and informed? >>

 

Informed about what the big jets and IFR aircraft are doing way up there, but nothing about the low level VFR you may encounter....

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There's no mandatory calls these days though. You only have to use it to avoid a collision.

Read the CASA publication reproduced at the top of this, it states “Radio carriage and USE is still MANDATORY”

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Read the CASA publication reproduced at the top of this, it states “Radio carriage and USE is still MANDATORY”
I did. I stand by my comment. Now howsabout you go look up the CAR's and CAAP's and tell us what the MANDATORY calls are...I'll wait.....

 

WHEN YOU MUST MAKE A BROADCAST

The one time you must make a broadcast is in a situation where you recognise a potential conflict between your aircraft and another in the vicinity of a noncontrolled aerodrome. In this case, it is your responsibility to acknowledge the situation by transmitting your callsign and, as appropriate, your aircraft type, position, level and intentions. Source

 

166C Responsibility for broadcasting on VHF radio

(1) If:

(a) an aircraft is operating on the manoeuvring area of, or in the vicinity of, a non‑controlled aerodrome; and

(b) the aircraft is carrying a serviceable aircraft VHF radio; and

© the pilot in command of the aircraft holds a radiotelephone qualification;

the pilot is responsible for making a broadcast on the VHF frequency in use for the aerodrome in accordance with subregulation (2).

 

(2) The pilot must make a broadcast that includes the following information whenever it is reasonably necessary to do so to avoid a collision, or the risk of a collision, with another aircraft:

(a) the name of the aerodrome;

(b) the aircraft’s type and call sign;

© the position of the aircraft and the pilot’s intentions.

Note 1: See the AIP for the recommended format for broadcasting the information mentioned in this regulation.

Note 2: For the requirement to maintain a listening watch, see regulation 243.

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I did. I stand by my comment. Now howsabout you go look up the CAR's and CAAP's and tell us what the MANDATORY calls are...I'll wait.....

I would say typical CASA. Let’s make sure no one can work out the rules, that way any time we like we’ve got them!

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I would say typical CASA. Let’s make sure no one can work out the rules, that way any time we like we’ve got them!
Couldn't agree more! Though there are a few ways in which you can use it to your advantage occasionally.

 

And I probably came across a bit snarky above, apologies, wasn't the intent. ?

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After a near miss or collision is when you realise the radio might have helped.. AS the PIC you must operate your aircraft in the most SAFE manner possible. THEY are covering their RS and passing the buck. Originally they specified many calls in the circuit regardless of the circuit and the traffic. NOW they have thrown it back to YOU.. TWO complete opposites on the one issue... It's happened before. Always say to yourself "At the Enquiry...,,,," Nev

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It is only when using the CTAF or Area frequencies that there are no mandatory calls other than to avoid a collision. In any MBZ area like Ballina you must make a call and also to enter any CTR which of course means you talk to the controller and not anyone out there. There are recommended calls in CTAF but if there is no-one around once you have announced your presence and intentions there is little point in clogging up 126.7 with irrelevant information.

 

Depending on conditions your broadcast may be heard hundreds of kilometres away where the frequency is busy and you may not hear their broadcasts back so all you are doing is annoying others.

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Having a radio is no guarantee that you will be safe. At my home strip we have aircraft flying on area frequency, because they do not even know that the strip is there. When you fly cross country are you looking for all those strips near your route and changing frequency to listen to all of them, or do you listen to area frequency to stay safe and informed?

 

Or, as happened with me, a pilot announced he was entering the airfield ATZ (airfield traffic zone - UK) when he was actiually entering downwind and we only saw him emerging from the sun literally with moments to spare. I filed and airprox on that one.

 

If I am overflying an airfield ATZ, (std dimensions are 2.5nm from centreline of the longest runway if more than one and 2,000' AGL) I will call them up to let them know what I am doing if I am flying less than about 1,500' above the ATZ height. But, for airfields without one, I won't generally call them up. Usually most aircraft enroute are not at or below circuit height - I never am (but it does happen)... So, in answer to your question, I would (not knowing CASA advice/regs) start onairfield frequency and shortly after leaving the circuit (with no ATZ active) would switch to area.. Any incoming that would present an immediate risk should have been on the frequency and announced themselves by that stage. Even with an ATZ active but no radio (which does occasionally happen - in which case you need prior permission), I wouldprobably witch to area frequency shortly after leaving the circuit.

 

Having a radio is no guarantee of safety.. Nothing we have available is a guarantee of safety (not even TCAS)... But they are part of the weaponry in our arsenal to help reduce the risk and improve safety.. Our eyes aren't going to guarantee us safety, either, but we don't fly around with our eyes closed... (Yenn, I am not having a go at you as you didn't say no need for a radio - just making sure anyone who is inexperienced reading this doesn't think to themselves they should dispense with one).

 

In GA aircraft, it is typical of club aircraft at least and many private aircraft to have two radios. You can had 1 set set as the communication set - so listening and talking to your local airfield frequency and the other set to listed to the area frequency. I know for recreational aircraft this is typically not the case (at least over here), but I would rather one than none. Evenin remote areas where thereis no ATC coverage, if your donk quits, you may be picked up transmitting your mayday by a passing airliner that could be the difference between life and death.

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Couldn't agree more! Though there are a few ways in which you can use it to your advantage occasionally.

 

And I probably came across a bit snarky above, apologies, wasn't the intent. ?

Not a problem! Trouble with text, it can have unintended consequences. What always bothers me is the possibility of two converging aircraft, neither of which is making broadcasts because they haven’t heard any radio traffic. I know it is all about see and be seen, but it sure as heck helps if you know there is someone around.

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SO,

IF ( it happened to me ) two aircraft, one landing downwind, other, into the wind ,

BOTH

Transmit exactly at the same time,

Which one will be heard ?.

Both pilots said they transmitted "turning base ect ", but neither heard anything !.

( our plane hurriedly ran off the runway to avoid a headon crash )

spacesailor

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Both seasoned pilots.

Both left the same airshow, both went for fuel at the same airport,

both had Words with each other,

Both happy chappies after.

BUT do we also to have , Light signal lamps in case of radio outage ?.

spacesailor

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