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A few years back, after the passing of a flyer mate, I was asked by the family if I would do a 'low & over' of his old stomping grounds to achieve his wish of having his ashes spread over the countryside that he grew up in. I'm very happy to take what's left of Pud on one last flight but ...... I've heard from various sources that, unless done correctly, the ashes have a better than average chance of ending up back in the enclosed cockpit (Champ 7BCM tandem) than in the slip stream. Accordingly, I'd welcome any pointers - do's - don't do's from anyone who's been down this track. Standing by w/ thanks.

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I read an article once where the ashes a guy distributed from his aircraft ran along the skin of the aircraft on release and damaged the aircraft paint work. Apparently they are very abrasive.

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You never empty ashes directly into an airstream. You cast out a container that is arranged to open, once clear of the airflow around the aircraft. That can't be too hard to engineer.

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You never empty ashes directly into an airstream. You cast out a container that is arranged to open, once clear of the airflow around the aircraft. That can't be too hard to engineer.

 

Agree - light weight paper bag that will open soon after ejection. Bag & ashes biodegradable. Best not to publicise your intentions - some people get very excited about over a few ashes being disposed of..

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I read an article once where the ashes a guy distributed from his aircraft ran along the skin of the aircraft on release and damaged the aircraft paint work. Apparently they are very abrasive.
True that. We (His wife and I) transshipped a pilot mates ashes from the crematoriums container to my home-built "pod" for dispersal and I can see how you could achieve an unintended sand-blasting of your horizontal stab.

 

Don't try bolting something like this on the club's 172, but in an aircraft you've built, or have authority to modify, then something like this pod can work well.

 

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Oh, dear - from the Living Legacy Forest site (who insist that tree planting for a Legacy, is better) ....

 

"Untreated cremation ashes have a pH of 12 which is the same as bleach and oven cleaner, and have been proven to cause detrimental effects on tree health" ....

 

Then there's ....

 

" In Western Australia, it is recommended that you obtain approval from the relevant controlling authority, before scattering ashes over public or private land.

If you are thinking about scattering ashes, it is always safest to research the area first, and speak to your funeral director, as they can assist you."

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