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Fatal accident...
(4/October/2020)
- Argentina 🇦🇷 :
A private experimentally built Sonex Sonex, registration LV-X628, clipped the left wing of a Rans Airaile 12X ultralight (LV-UX-056) and impacted terrain in Parada Leis, MI.
The airplane was destroyed and the pilot was fatally injured. However, the pilot's son survived with serious injuries.

Multiple bystander videos show that the Sonex was flying very low at high speed when it clipped the wing of the Rans Airaile. Control was lost and the Sonex impacted the ground with the left wing.

 

 

https://economis.com.ar/un-posadeno-se-mato-al-caer-con-su-avioneta-en-parada-leis-y-su-hijo-esta-grave/

Edited by Garfly
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I was hoping there was going to be a model crash when i seen JW hobby in the top corner, not a full size job, what a waste of life and plane.😢

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Pretty poor friends to endorse such behaviour, he appeared to be playing up for the crowd.

with bad results. This is where you want mates to pull you up before something stupid kills you.

 

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10 hours ago, ClintonB said:

Pretty poor friends to endorse such behaviour, he appeared to be playing up for the crowd.

with bad results. This is where you want mates to pull you up before something stupid kills you.

 

Hmmm, why should “mates” be responsible for policing other peoples' behaviour? Every time I've tried that I end up being “the bad guy”.

If someone does something stupid, I'm just going to get as far away from them as possible because they're likely to end up like the guy in the video and I can't be bothered performing CPR on suicide attempts.

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2 hours ago, cscotthendry said:

I can't be bothered performing CPR on suicide attempts.

An interesting dilemma. Which is the greater duty - to preserve life or to respect another's control over their life?

 

If one chooses to preserve life, then the logical corollary is to abolish those threats to life that one is able to - such as the use of tobacco; over-use of alcohol and the abuse of natural and man-made drugs.

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At Gawler, years go I heard about a guy who took off from a taxyway which was between 2 rows of hangars. I thought it was funny but a wiser mate thought he should have been grounded.

A few months later, he killed himself and a young passenger by hooning, but not at Gawler.

This was a sobering lesson for me and I have come to the conclusion that he should have been in big trouble for that take-off. If he had, he may have thought twice about hooning with a passenger.

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Some "show off" desperates are beyond redemption. They'll keep doing it till something happens The passenger is the injured innocent. Frequently at places I'd flown to, people  I have never met would ask me to do some fool type departure in my Citabria. as if some crazy stunt is expected of you.. Too often this sort of thing ,illegal and impromptu has resulted in spectacular death of all occupants.  Nev

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When leaving fly-ins and whatnot, often cameras are rolling and there's temptation for a hold-my-beer-and-watch-this departure. And that's exactly why I just depart very smoothly into the sunset and they can film that. As others said, if you do say something to a nitwit, they will just flat out deny it. Report to authorities and they can do nothing without video proof, and even then probably nuthin. Years later when they change occupation and become an 'aircraft parts distributor' (all over the field), everyone comes out of the woodwork and and says "yep, we all knew it was only a matter of time and place."

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When you see someone indulging in activities that are blatantly foolhardy, and putting innocent passengers at risk, it behoves you to speak up.

If they're doing it by themselves and only risking their own neck, say nothing, it's just their life they're putting on the line. A sizeable number of people are known sizeable risk-takers.

 

I can recall a bloke from Perth many years ago who got his unrestricted PPL, hired a 4 seater, got 3 friends to ride with him, while he showed off his pilot hooning skills - in the form of unauthorised low flying.

He found a paddock full of cattle, and got a great deal of delight in buzzing the cattle at low altitude, and watching them scatter.

That worked, up until the point he misjudged his height, clipped a steer with the fixed undercarriage, and bit the dust big-time, upside-down, killing everyone on board. As the Americans say, "You cain't fix stoopid".

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55 minutes ago, onetrack said:

killing everyone on board

And provided more fodder to the ignorant meeja about the safety of light aircraft. It's amazing that killing four people while hooning in a motor vehicle doesn't elicit the same hysteria in the meeja that a bumpy forced landing in a small two-seater aircraft does.

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Low flying in itself isn't the real cause of death in these accidents: it's the fact that it looks so easy when done by professionals, eg, aggies.  But, ýou don't know what you don't know'' and pulling up over obstacles in a show-off bit of flying isn't the time to find out the truth of that statement.  However, I blame our regulator for the fact that low flying accidents continue to occur. If the training syllabus include a hour of low flying, and an hour of IF, then a majority of student pilots would be emphatically convinced that they should not be playing around at low level or in the clouds. It is actually covered by CASR 61.385 which in effect says you should not carry out any form of flight in which you are not 'competent' which of course begs the question as to what really defines competency?  For some pilots it's the extent of their ego, rather than the proof in the logbook.

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I have always reckoned that to be thought a good pilot by those that know, you need to never come to their attention. Never show off, never push the boundaries. I can't say that I have always been successful at this, but I have tried with a couple of ommissions. One of which was watched by a CASA rep, who said nothing until I asked his opinion as someone else had admonished me.

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On 11/10/2020 at 6:45 AM, cscotthendry said:

Hmmm, why should “mates” be responsible for policing other peoples' behaviour? Every time I've tried that I end up being “the bad guy”.

If someone does something stupid, I'm just going to get as far away from them as possible because they're likely to end up like the guy in the video and I can't be bothered performing CPR on suicide attempts.

I didn’t say something when I thought I should have and live to regret it. If I now see something I consider unsafe I have no hesitation in talking tactfully and at the right time to the person(s). It sure beats attending the coroners court. The act might be through ingnorance, inexperience or poor judgement - but I speak up. 

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Interesting. How to avoid a low level pass prang ?

 

I’m guessing the pilot of the Sonex drove his car to the airport on the day - drove down the road at 100 k’s/hour. On-coming traffic a mere few feet away doing 100k’s/hr giving a combined speed of 200km/hr. How did the pilot survive the drive to the airport ?... sighting lines on the road ? Not all roads have sighting lines... something else ?

 

 

 

 

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