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Throttle and recovery from stall and spin.


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Just WHY are WE discussing  this on a forum in this manner? There's MANY different ways of recovering from spins required with different aircraft. Far too many to make statements giving detailed ways of recovering when most of you have never ever done one. Some of you are putting out opinions that ARE dangerous. They tell far from the whole story. People who test planes for spinning for a job have anti spin parachutes for the plane and parachutes for themselves and still have close calls and lose planes. If you don't watch yourself you can easily enter an inverted spin in the recovery . I know very experienced pilots who have done just that and consider themselves lucky to be around. Nev

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When your world just turned upside down; I doubt that you would remember the theory when that happens, so I would recommend an hour with an Instructor in a suitable GA aircraft doing just recovery fro

Just WHY are WE discussing  this on a forum in this manner? There's MANY different ways of recovering from spins required with different aircraft. Far too many to make statements giving detailed ways

I'd lay money that it's got more to do with the lack of low level training in the syllabus. From what I've seen a lot of the low level stall/spins are after an event like an engine fail and being

1 hour ago, facthunter said:

Just WHY are WE discussing  this on a forum in this manner? There's MANY different ways of recovering from spins required with different aircraft. Far too many to make statements giving detailed ways of recovering when most of you have never ever done one. Some of you are putting out opinions that ARE dangerous. They tell far from the whole story. People who test planes for spinning for a job have anti spin parachutes for the plane and parachutes for themselves and still have close calls and lose planes. If you don't watch yourself you can easily enter an inverted spin in the recovery . I know very experienced pilots who have done just that and consider themselves lucky to be around. Nev

Absolutely agree, I’m not an instructor; and the first post detail is concerning. Best to work with the instructor and the aircrafts traits at stall for a start. I believe APen should be working on stall with a wing drop first if this has not been done to date and then do some steep climbing turns to stall, all with an instructor and agreement first.  Not sure what rego and if RAA reg won’t / shouldn’t be doing spins.  May be done in GA of course or experience in a glider.  I have done many spins in my gliding time.

 

 

 

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No wonder there are so many accidents involving inadvertent low level stalls. There seem to be many misunderstandings around stall recovery and the aerodynamics involved. I currently hold both GA and RAAus instructor ratings and have held CASA CFI, Flight testing and RAA CFI quals. Over the years I have had the opportunity to provide tailwheel and aerobatic training to flight instructors. Their poor knowledge of slow flight, stall and spin recovery always concerned me, what I’m seeing here is no doubt the result of this. 

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It'd appear from this vid, that teach-yourself-stall-spins is seen by some instructors (stateside) as an okay ab-initio exercise.

 

Some wild and wonderful discussion in the YouTube comments.

 

 

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8 minutes ago, APenNameAndThatA said:

This is me doing an inverted spin and recovery in an Extra 300. I stand by my previous comments and have nothing to add.

I believe you; that Brisbane scenery's great.

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22 hours ago, Roundsounds said:

No wonder there are so many accidents involving inadvertent low level stalls.

I'd lay money that it's got more to do with the lack of low level training in the syllabus.

From what I've seen a lot of the low level stall/spins are after an event like an engine fail and being very uncomfortable manoeuvring close to the ground, make serious mistakes.

I may be wrong, as I don't know what other instructors teach these days, but the ones I use insist on competency with slow flight, stalls and recovery, and such.

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Agree M61A1; it took me 4 years at my 2nd bfr to 100% appreciate what wing drops in a turning stall, I had things all wrong up to that time.  That's why I mentioned in my recent post above to ask the instructor to teach such at 4,000 ft agl of course.

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