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In almost 2k hours gliding I have intentionally entered cloud on only a half dozen occasions pre GPS using Turn and Slip and the airspeed indicator as the primary means of staying in control.  

The trick was to transition onto those instruments at least 200ft below the cloud base noting the compass heading for the direction you wished to leave the thermal and not moving your head.  Once in the cloud the turn was continued keeping the turn rate as constant as possible again without moving the head.  When straightening out to leave the cloud the sensation that you were turning the other way was quite strong. I would tilt my head to counter this sensation and stay concentrated on the Turn and Slip until clear of the cloud.  In a retractable glider I would also lower the undercarriage before entering the cloud.  The extra drag helped to stabilise the speed and the added sound would aid airspeed control, but in any case if the airspeed started to increase rapidly airbrake was immediately deployed.

Found out quickly that the time spent in the cloud wiped out the extra altitude gained and those gliders that stayed below the cloud were always much faster round the course.

The real point to be made here is that you cannot just flick over from visual to IMC in an instant. It takes time for the brain to adjust to the transition.  The fanciest piece of electronic equipment would not have prevented the upset and near fatal incident.

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Here is a good explanation from a gliding instructor (not the one in the subject glider) including parts of the actual video.      

Sobering to see how quickly it turns to custard...........(

In almost 2k hours gliding I have intentionally entered cloud on only a half dozen occasions pre GPS using Turn and Slip and the airspeed indicator as the primary means of staying in control.   T

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Agree with a lot of that but may I suggest you don't tilt your head. You are better to just keep it vertical in relation to the aircraft  axis. Transitioning to instruments is done on rotation on take off, when the fuselage pitches up and you are no longer going to stop if anything happens. In a prolonged turn rolling out of it produces a feeling of entering a turn in the opposite direction. There is NO WAY of avoiding this sensation and it just has to be ignored in favour of TRUSTING the instruments. It's the semi circular canals in your middle ear that normally help you balance . IF you are trained you can change in seconds but it can't be half and half . IT's ONE or the other.. Nev

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Many years ago I had the opportunity to play crash test dummy for a system that projected a laser line on the cockpit that matched the horizon. It was intended to give you peripheral cues and help your eyes convince the rest of your brain which way you were tilted. To answer the first question.. No it didn't work well during the day. To answer the second question.. yes I wore laser goggles.. To answer the third question... It didn't work... it made bugger all difference. 

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15 hours ago, facthunter said:

........may I suggest you don't tilt your head. You are better to just keep it vertical in relation to the aircraft  axis.....

Tilting the head seem to work for me when returning to wings level after a prolonged turn in IMC.  When clear of cloud it took a few seconds until the visuals started to synch with the semi circular canals in the ear then I could straighten my head ...

Having said that those flights happened over 40 years ago..today I would not trust my ability to fly IMC.  

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I think augmented reality glasses would be a much better solution here. Project the horizon and a whole bunch of stuff into your field of view  without disturbing the far field view.

 

They work great on the bike. And in underground work , and in a lecture theatre, and and and. 

 

Or, project an image onto the canopy with a Laser vision projector (they don't have lens, direct scanning spot projection )

 

Or , you could just look at your HSI

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