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I don't suffer from motion sickness normally, but once took some medication before embarking on a racing yacht in the middle of a stormy night. It seemed like a good idea at the time.

I lost my dinner after a couple of hours (I think most of us did), that was okay. But what I really didn't like was the weird after-affects of the meds.

 

So if I was looking at taking meds to help with something like aerobatics, I would definitely be trying them beforehand to make sure they didn't make me feel weird.

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2 hours ago, Bosi72 said:

Congrats on your first Aeros flight! 

 

Food wise, no much advices here other than piloting (not being a passenger), hydration and light food. They say high sugar levels help with G's, finally something good out of my diabetes 🙂

 

Focus on flying, ask instructor to follow up  by touching yoke/stick when demonstrating. My weak points are tailspins, 2 or 3 in a row at the end of a lesson can upset stomach, but I think it's mainly because eyes closed before recovering.

 

Which aircraft you fly?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's a robin rego is NZT  I started to feel sick after the high g steep turn. And that when i wasn't on the controls.

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1 hour ago, IBob said:

I don't suffer from motion sickness normally, but once took some medication before embarking on a racing yacht in the middle of a stormy night. It seemed like a good idea at the time.

I lost my dinner after a couple of hours (I think most of us did), that was okay. But what I really didn't like was the weird after-affects of the meds.

 

So if I was looking at taking meds to help with something like aerobatics, I would definitely be trying them beforehand to make sure they didn't make me feel weird.

Funny story my wife took some sea sickness meds on a trip back from tassie we booked a nice cabin romance and all that. She slept all the way back to melb. thanks for the tips.

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2 hours ago, facthunter said:

Some sickness pills have bad side effects if you are piloting, Ginger I've mentioned. Doing the flying is a big help. Some students or ROUGH "experts" would make me quite crook if i'm just sitting there copping what they dish out. . It can come on after you've landed as well. One keen chap just wanted to keep doing spins in a Tiger on a real hot day and after close to an hour I knew I couldn't keep it down any longer so Just  said "I have it. Keep on the controls and I'll do a hard sideslip" and out over the side it went and no one was any the wiser. I've had to clean up  the plane a few times and it's good to avoid that. Nev

This was the first time i have ever felt sick on a aircraft. So i was surprised and it started when he was doing a demo of steep high g turn and i wasn't on the controls.

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I did aeros way back in the seventies, then never did any more. Now I can stand about 3G and no more. I suppose if I took it up again that I would come good, but it would be a slow process. If you are young and fit, ie under 80 and breathing go for it. Enjoy it.

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"Some" aeros are unpleasant and even risky to your welfare especially high negative"G" types. You don't need to burst a blood vessel in your eye or your Brain .  .  Doesn't help to be a mature age person or SOB whichever term you prefer..   You can restrict yourself to around 3 "G". or just over easily enough if you know what you are about. Note.   Aerobatics are supposed to be "Intentional".. Any other kind you don't want to be involved with. . Nev

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 If you are young and fit, ie under 80 and breathing go for it. Enjoy it. ".

Bugga !. i  was going to try on next years fourscore birthday. 

Can I ask the pilot to start SSLLOOWWLLYY. LoL

I'm up  to 40 pushups, after last years New hip.

and

Half a chin-up.

next year the Sydney Marathon. LoLder

spacesailor

 

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Just say NO extreme manoeuvers, thanks. A good BARREL roll won't spill your coffee, or pull much"G". You"ll pull more in a simple inside loop..Nev

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  • 2 weeks later...

Congratulations Shafs!

I have introduced 100s of people to aerobatics over the last 40 years, both as passengers and students. 
The trick is to follow the above guidance of fresh air inflight and food intake pre flight, then do short flights, gradually increasing duration. The old story of wishing you were up there, rather than wishing you were on the ground.
You may also want to try Sea Bands, you can pick them

up from pharmacies, they use pressure pints to reduce motion sickness. I was very sceptical about their effectiveness, but have had many people use them with great success. 

Maintaining situational awareness reduces the tendency to become ill, have the pilot tell you where they are looking during manoeuvres, or if unsure, have a quick look to see where they’re looking. The objective is to maintain sight of the horizon. 
enjoy!

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Just ease into it, if you feel your getting crook stop. Only do it for short periods to start, building to longer as you go. Do it at the end of a flight (after circuits or just flying around getting comfortable) so when you start to feel off land straight away. Remember your doing it for fun, when that ceases you should stop. Flying sick or uncomfortable you will not learn anything. Make sure the instructor knows what you want and is the right man for the job. I have had aero instructors who were only interested in showing how good they were, they are there to help you not show off.

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I was thinking the same as you doing stuff that can make me sick later in the flights. I really enjoyed the flight and was surprised that i got sick as i have never experienced motion sickness. crossed bass strait a few times in rough seas and watched heaps of people getting sick but not me. but nut now i have joined that club.

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There are many things that contribute to motion sickness.  FEAR is considered to be one of them. Actually DOING the flying helps a lot. I know that to be a fact. Someone else can still make me nauseous especially if I don't fully trust them and they fly pretty uncoordinated.. and it goes on for  considerable time.. I really don't believe that much changes with time  unless it's something causing it that you overcome. Nev

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To me, aerobatic flying represents the apex of my flying experiences, but I probably don't represent the norm of the average pilot. The percentage that of pilots that happily engage indulging inverted flight leaves us in a small minority, which establishes its own balance.

 

My introduction to aerobatic flight, nearly 50 years ago,  occurred at our local aero club's Xmas function, just after I had gone solo in a venerable C172. We had a great "gatekeeper" as a member, as welcoming and inclusive as you can get, who invited me for a fly in his Victa Airtourer. Arthur had a well established reputation for his aerobatic skills, but I still accepted the invitation. We launched off in the Airtourer and I had a leisurely 20 minute  introduction to the Airtourer, being quite taken with it crisp handling after the Cessna experience. We steadily gained some altitude and from the left seat came: "I reckon I can teach you an aileron roll in two minutes"!!  One quick briefing, one demonstrated roll, next one following through with fingers on the spade handle followed by the next one being mine. 120 seconds had not elapsed. What a positive experience. As gentle as, no stress or discomfort and I had a huge smile on my face. I ended up buying that Airtourer 16 months later when Arthur sold it to buy another Airtourer. The only sour note came from my flying instructor who was far from enamoured of his student being so happy with the experience.

 

Once I had about 40 hours on the Airtourer I explored what options were available for gaining an aerobatic rating. My good fortune was that John Douglas, the then CFI of the Royal Aero Club of WA, who learnt to fly on Airtourers in NZ was happy to instruct me. John used to bring his lunch along and devour it while we were ascending to 4000'. We would engage in about 30 minutes of instruction, and once the lesson was concluded it was John's aircraft as we aerobatted vigorously to 1500'. What an experience to observe your aircraft seemlessly flowing from one  manoeuvre to the next, with the controls just being caressed by an instructor of the highest order. My memory winces when I recall that in 1975 dollars I parted with $35 for John's instruction. No better value have I ever received.

 

"Go back home and just enjoy you rating" intoned John, followed by firm advice to respect the 3000' insurance policy. And that's what I did for the next 11 years, as well as flying some aeros in a Chippie, Tiger Moth, Fuji and Beagle Pup.

 

I got conned by a fellow Airtourer mate to attend, as a visitor, a monthly Aerobatic comp. at RACWA in 1986. Nett result was both of us in his 115 Airtourer, with me looking at the sequence on the climb up and trying to commit it to memory. To the surprise of all, probably more so to me, I got a placing, and heaps of encouragement to continue. I gained a lot of satisfaction from that flying, but it certainly differed from leisure aerobatics. Taking a 100 Airtourer into competitions is a bit like tackling Bathurst in a Cooper S!

 

Whilst my experience has been very positive, I am also mindful of the many pitfalls that have arisen with aerobatic flight. There are way too many variables that can detract from the experience. If your instincts don't feel right, get to clear air or safe and firm ground.

 

There is also a risk factor, which should not be understated. Safety is no accident. The two pilots I know who have died came from avoidable incidents.

 

When I make my last log book entry I know it contains the record of many hours happily aerobatting.

 

 

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2 hours ago, naremman said:

To me, aerobatic flying represents the apex of my flying experiences, but I probably don't represent the norm of the average pilot. The percentage that of pilots that happily engage indulging inverted flight leaves us in a small minority, which establishes its own balance.

 

My introduction to aerobatic flight, nearly 50 years ago,  occurred at our local aero club's Xmas function, just after I had gone solo in a venerable C172. We had a great "gatekeeper" as a member, as welcoming and inclusive as you can get, who invited me for a fly in his Victa Airtourer. Arthur had a well established reputation for his aerobatic skills, but I still accepted the invitation. We launched off in the Airtourer and I had a leisurely 20 minute  introduction to the Airtourer, being quite taken with it crisp handling after the Cessna experience. We steadily gained some altitude and from the left seat came: "I reckon I can teach you an aileron roll in two minutes"!!  One quick briefing, one demonstrated roll, next one following through with fingers on the spade handle followed by the next one being mine. 120 seconds had not elapsed. What a positive experience. As gentle as, no stress or discomfort and I had a huge smile on my face. I ended up buying that Airtourer 16 months later when Arthur sold it to buy another Airtourer. The only sour note came from my flying instructor who was far from enamoured of his student being so happy with the experience.

 

Once I had about 40 hours on the Airtourer I explored what options were available for gaining an aerobatic rating. My good fortune was that John Douglas, the then CFI of the Royal Aero Club of WA, who learnt to fly on Airtourers in NZ was happy to instruct me. John used to bring his lunch along and devour it while we were ascending to 4000'. We would engage in about 30 minutes of instruction, and once the lesson was concluded it was John's aircraft as we aerobatted vigorously to 1500'. What an experience to observe your aircraft seemlessly flowing from one  manoeuvre to the next, with the controls just being caressed by an instructor of the highest order. My memory winces when I recall that in 1975 dollars I parted with $35 for John's instruction. No better value have I ever received.

 

"Go back home and just enjoy you rating" intoned John, followed by firm advice to respect the 3000' insurance policy. And that's what I did for the next 11 years, as well as flying some aeros in a Chippie, Tiger Moth, Fuji and Beagle Pup.

 

I got conned by a fellow Airtourer mate to attend, as a visitor, a monthly Aerobatic comp. at RACWA in 1986. Nett result was both of us in his 115 Airtourer, with me looking at the sequence on the climb up and trying to commit it to memory. To the surprise of all, probably more so to me, I got a placing, and heaps of encouragement to continue. I gained a lot of satisfaction from that flying, but it certainly differed from leisure aerobatics. Taking a 100 Airtourer into competitions is a bit like tackling Bathurst in a Cooper S!

 

Whilst my experience has been very positive, I am also mindful of the many pitfalls that have arisen with aerobatic flight. There are way too many variables that can detract from the experience. If your instincts don't feel right, get to clear air or safe and firm ground.

 

There is also a risk factor, which should not be understated. Safety is no accident. The two pilots I know who have died came from avoidable incidents.

 

When I make my last log book entry I know it contains the record of many hours happily aerobatting.

 

 

Aerobatic incidents? 

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Are we going to be Allowed over your boarder, or will we have stay " interstate ".

I have an outstanding invite to Echuca !.

spacesailor

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I,m sitting under our Jackaranda tree, feet in a plastic pool of Coool water !, temp 41 degrees, feels like, all of 34 degrees. LoL

spacesailor

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 24/01/2021 at 3:57 PM, spacesailor said:

Are we going to be Allowed over your boarder, or will we have stay " interstate ".

I have an outstanding invite to Echuca !.

spacesailor

As long as you have a Permit to enter Victoria, and no further restrictions, should be fine..

 

https://www.service.vic.gov.au/services/border-permit/home

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Does Our Light Aircraft Championship meet any criteria for interstate travel ? .

Just asking!.  ( any spare seats )  LoL

spacesailor

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