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Take your Jab up high, do a 45° turn and let it stall. You'll find the Jab does not flip into a spin or turn upside down, it will actually level off if anything. Jab stalls are very benign. 

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9 minutes ago, RFguy said:

... these airplanes are well behaved and subtle

This is exactly what I am expecting to hear, from those who have a real life experience with the J160. It is almost impossible to stall a plane, as long as you - don't pull on the stick! The single most important maneuver that causes the airplane to stall (IMO) is pulling back on the stick, no matter what the configuration. If unsure what to do, just release the back pressure on the stick, and most certified, "well behaved" planes will fly themselves out of the stall. I just wanted to confirm that the J160 will not bite, and behave as expected.

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Go fly a Tomahawk (PA38) They were designed to have a 'nasty' stall. Pull the yoke back and keep it there and 9 out of 10 times the left wing will drop, like a rope breaking. I remember many stalls, spins and spirals in the 'Traumahawk'.

 

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Agree 100% with 7252.... and especially  in the level flying, the Jab isn't going to go suddenly into a stall spin. They don't do that.

14 minutes ago, Jabiru7252 said:

Take your Jab up high, do a 45° turn and let it stall. You'll find the Jab does not flip into a spin or turn upside down, it will actually level off if anything. Jab stalls are very benign. 

 

and of course, you are on the ball , aren't you ?

You get onto the "undesired aircraft condition "  like an attack dog with nose down and power ! 

 

1) if you are established on base or final with 65 kts, you already have your flaps out , dont you ?

2) If you cannot use flaps, then you have added 7 to 10 knots of airspeed anyway.....

 

 

 

 

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Do they still go as far as demonstrating incipient spin recovery? 

 

That was fun to do in the ol' C-150. The only trouble was that with incipient spins, and stalls, they wouldn't let you wait before you had to recover. It was a bit silly really. The instructor would tell you that now you are going to do an spin entry, or a stall and you'd set up for that to happen. When it did, you reacted incredibly fast and put in the corrections. 

 

I'd live to put a plane into a straight ahead stall and see what happens if you did not correct for, say, ten seconds. I don't know how I'd go in a fully developed spin. Grins would be replaced with technicolor yawns in my case.

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2 hours ago, RFguy said:

the flap out  stall speed is 45 kts in the J160. meets LSA.  

 

Just! - that bit of mud, the carcass of a squillion flies and it may just drop on the wrong side of 45 knots.

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I do not think spin training or spiral dives (did both as a PPL student) are required in LSA training. We used to do fully developed spins in the Tomahawk. Spin long enough for the instructor to point out airspeed, rate of descent, impact point etc. Thank God we don't do that anymore, I'd lose my lunch in my rompers pretty quick these days...

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correct- not required for LSA , and indeed most LSA aircraft are not certified / approved for those maneuvers.

 

Many like the Brumby 610 have had the full suite of spin testing to ASTM F2245-16C,  Jabirus also have had exhaustive spin and crazy stuff testing. 

 

but they're not approved for intentional spins.....

 

see this video- The Brumby pops out of intentional spins very positively.

 

https://www.brumbyaircraft.com.au/certification

 

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Twister lost his engine at about 4.45 mins. Do you think he entered a high-speed stall just before impact?

 

 

 

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Annum,

having flown most types of jabs I have a bit of a “rule of thumb “

UL. Not flown one

SK -need more rudder and elevator 

SP - fast, sporty, land straight away, not bad in turbulence

160- good speed, land when you want them to even if you are a little fast, roomy, good in turbulence 

170 -roomy, need to watch landing speed or you will float, getting tubbier every year

200 top plane though 85 kts best glide can be an issue if having to land in a small paddock

230 good a/c with good speed, though working on 6 pots can drive you crazy if you need to remove the centre heads and barrels and having to use a crane lift to get enough space to removed the carb fuel bowl

 

hope this helps, others may have observations of their own

Ken

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dunno....looks like  he just didn't have enough room to pull out of the curve , and I would venture to say not enough authority in the rear . elevator break or jam ?  I cannot see a stall. but might need to watch it a few more times. 

Oh yes, I think there was a stall at the very end about 6 feet AGL.

 

 

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3 hours ago, skippydiesel said:

Just! - that bit of mud, the carcass of a squillion flies and it may just drop on the wrong side of 45 knots.

Is that an informed observation, or your personal opinion?

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2 hours ago, Roscoe said:

Is that an informed observation, or your personal opinion?

Bit of tongue in cheek (mostly cheek) but also making the point that any aircraft that just meets the standard, is probably doing so, on  a nice cool day with a nice clean wing.

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