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On 13/02/2021 at 8:50 PM, Garfly said:

 

 

Interesting clip.

 

Two observations from the benefit of my arm chair. First I was interested to see a tricycle undercarriage nose over like that  in the rough.

 

Second, I dunno the aircraft type or its approach speed but I felt (with the benefit of hindsight!) that the pilot was carrying a bit of extra speed into his approach. Flaps dropped to late to slow him down much and if he hadn't nosed in, the aircraft would have gone into the trees... 

 

But the pilot saved himself and any passenger  and that aircraft will likely fly again -so all things considered great flying!

 

Easy to  be an armchair critic -but this  same thing happened to me in 2017...

 

Alan

 

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There’s been a bit of discussion (argument) recently regarding the difference between glide ratios at idle power vs with prop stopped. I’ve long known from experience that the glide ratio with prop st

Interesting clip.   Two observations from the benefit of my arm chair. First I was interested to see a tricycle undercarriage nose over like that  in the rough.   Second, I dunno t

Did you learn anything you could apply to your skills base, re planning glide approaches generally? I'd say not much and if landing right on the keys is your aim you better "unlearn" it. Very few inst

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14 hours ago, Garfly said:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From this altitude, I would be heading direct towards the airport then spiraling/circling down. But could be the camera not doing it a justice, or pilot practiced there before. In any case, well done !

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Did you learn anything you could apply to your skills base, re planning glide approaches generally? I'd say not much and if landing right on the keys is your aim you better "unlearn" it. Very few instructional briefings on forced landings are fullsome and satisfactory according to an ex casa ATO I know and I have no difficulty believing him. Having a few basic No No's make a good start  People still muck up many partial or total failure of the engine landings by getting slow. trying to stretch the glide.. You can wash off extra  height but you can't usually gain it, if your judgement has been in error. Nev

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On 04/02/2021 at 11:51 PM, NT5224 said:

Great clip but gotta say I thought his turn onto final rather steep with engine out. Still,did the trick I guess...

 

Alan

A slip is much safer than a skid. Disclaimer: I have 117 hours. 

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A slip has crossed controls skid usually not. Balanced flight always better, there are times when a slip can be used to loose height/speed. Some people who can't/don't want to crab down final in a crosswind use flying out of balance or a skid. I have always used crabbing.

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On 22/02/2021 at 12:22 PM, facthunter said:

Did you learn anything you could apply to your skills base, re planning glide approaches generally? I'd say not much and if landing right on the keys is your aim you better "unlearn" it. Very few instructional briefings on forced landings are fullsome and satisfactory according to an ex casa ATO I know and I have no difficulty believing him. Having a few basic No No's make a good start  People still muck up many partial or total failure of the engine landings by getting slow. trying to stretch the glide.. You can wash off extra  height but you can't usually gain it, if your judgement has been in error. Nev

I just realised this video have a sound and is actually staged 🙂

 

Regardless, if I'm at 8500ft and engine stops, and have that big aerodrome is in sight, I would still head directly towards the aerodrome, then spiraling down (until I can play high key/low key).  Reason: those mountains where you can clearly see the trees could generate some strong winds called "mountain waves" (I'm sure you've heard about them), winds that could push you down sooner than you've planned, then as you said "stretching the glide" may be too late.

 

I like your rhetoric "did you learn anything - unlearn" or "no no". Ah you must be a very smart person ?

I hope you are not instructor using that method when teaching the students.

 

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On 06/02/2021 at 2:31 PM, facthunter said:

Forcing planes onto the ground usually ends up bad. .Nev

While Stick and Rudder is still fresh I can more or less quote it...

 

The “old timers” would do a forced landing while pretending an actual airfield was beneath them. 
 

As the book was written in the 40’s the old timers were really the first aviators with unreliable engines. They knew their stuff. I know in the mid west where I had a reasonable chance of a corn field landing the idea was to land on the corntops as if it’s the runway. A rocky field would take some guts to do so but what choice if that’s the only one left. Do a normal landing onto the rocky field.

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1 hour ago, Student Pilot said:

A slip has crossed controls skid usually not. Balanced flight always better, there are times when a slip can be used to loose height/speed. Some people who can't/don't want to crab down final in a crosswind use flying out of balance or a skid. I have always used crabbing.

I’ve been thinking about this with my 110 flying hours limited knowledge.
 

Can I use the following... As long as the wing in front of me is low and forward and I’m ground tracking in the right direction With sufficient airspeed (say best glide) the aircraft is in a relatively safe attitude. 

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