Jump to content

Recommended Posts

This nice Colt got up ended while waiting on the apron at cowra today. Wind did not seem very strong. The team from lachlan valley aviation righted it without further damage. I hope someone has the love it will need.

 

PicsArt_1615274758188.jpg

PicsArt_1615274649041.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Bloody forums.. I wonder about them and this one today in light of mod activity then see this. It’s awful to see the aircraft in an undignified pose and think about the owner and what’s required. It’s also knowledge brought in. I knew LSA aircraft need more dive away from the wind etc while taxiing attention. Saw a forum in USA where one flipped taxiing.

 

I had no idea an aircraft could be upended like this not moving and obviously not in strong winds. Freakish. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, Mike Gearon said:

Bloody forums.. I wonder about them and this one today in light of mod activity then see this. It’s awful to see the aircraft in an undignified pose and think about the owner and what’s required. It’s also knowledge brought in. I knew LSA aircraft need more dive away from the wind etc while taxiing attention. Saw a forum in USA where one flipped taxiing.

 

I had no idea an aircraft could be upended like this not moving and obviously not in strong winds. Freakish. 

I have left the thruster sitting out in similar wind conditions,  it certainly made me think. Probably just a little  willy willy.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Prop & tail look like they escaped injury but probably some serious stuff to the wing and spars.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll wager it was a savage little gust of wind that sprung up out of nowhere - a willy-willy, cock-eyed bob, dust devil, or whatever name you know it by. The BOM would refer to it as mini-tornado.

They are sudden, vicious, and can be very damaging. More than one caravanner has lost a complete awning to one, in a burst of sudden destruction.

They start with heating on a bright sunny day, on a big open bare area of concrete, bitumen, or just bare clayey ground, where thermals build up rapidly.

Just as rogue waves catch out rock fisherman unprepared, so do these mini-thermals catch out those who don't secure their aircraft to tiedowns when unattended.

  • Like 3
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Cock-eyed Bob. 🙂 never heard of that. All mine will be labelled as such in future. Cock-eyed Bob made an appearance as we were landing the Foxbat out on French island some weeks back. Probably 1 wing high and he came in from the right. He was a viscous little bugger. Not much wind otherwise. I’ll use him as an excuse if I ever have to post up upside down aircraft I’ve managed out on the island. Hoping to not do so. Haven’t in fact ever seen many and maybe the Birdseye view made Bob obvious on that day.

Edited by Mike Gearon
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a picture from last week, a small stubble burn. That is a 6 metre power pole near the base of the willy willy. They are fairly common inland but usually go unseen unless there is ash or dust on ground.

 

Resized_20210306_170842_3845.jpeg

  • Like 3
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

without leaves or dust they are invisible. A sea breeze overcoming a hot from the Land wind, can be exciting also. Nev

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Student Pilot said:

Colts a lovely little aircraft

Too true!

 

1694940662_IRWinhangar_2.thumb.jpeg.38107a4112a985e366f4761ab5f7e7b2.jpeg

 

31 minutes ago, Student Pilot said:

 

 😁 Any Pipers are great little machines

Yep, remember ye olde SWP conventions

 

1190660613_swp1adj.thumb.jpeg.62cc8b3d4bb1840413e8d76ed1a37fa1.jpeg

 

1087326968_SRDpalsatTOC.thumb.jpg.23a562bd35de6030872c7f7afe16b52a.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I too never heard of a cock-eyed bob before. Whirywinds, thermals, willy-willies, mini-tornados ( for really strong ones). Strange we haven't got a proper word huh.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think than tornado is the correct description with mini describing its size. When I was hang gliding we called them dust devils as they always occured when it was hot & dry presumably due to small thermals popping off and tiny areas of low pressure occurred & they tore along the ground picking up dust, dry grass, leaves etc and hang gliders if they were parked in the way. One happed at the launch site at Coronet Peak when about 40 gliders were set up. Created absolute havoc

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/03/2021 at 1:10 PM, Bruce Tuncks said:

I too never heard of a cock-eyed bob before. Whirywinds, thermals, willy-willies, mini-tornados ( for really strong ones). Strange we haven't got a proper word huh.

The official term used by the ATIS is "Dust Devil". Yep, believe it or not. I flew through one in a Piper Tomahawk at about 300 feet AGL. I thought a bus had hit me.

Edited by Jabiru7252
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a good illustration of the force they are capable of.  Sometimes there is no associated dust like at a grass airport and are not visible. Nev

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
On 10/03/2021 at 9:36 AM, onetrack said:

I'll wager it was a savage little gust of wind that sprung up out of nowhere - a willy-willy, cock-eyed bob, dust devil, or whatever name you know it by. The BOM would refer to it as mini-tornado.

They are sudden, vicious, and can be very damaging. More than one caravanner has lost a complete awning to one, in a burst of sudden destruction.

They start with heating on a bright sunny day, on a big open bare area of concrete, bitumen, or just bare clayey ground, where thermals build up rapidly.

Just as rogue waves catch out rock fisherman unprepared, so do these mini-thermals catch out those who don't secure their aircraft to tiedowns when unattended.

At Oakey, I was briefing a student to go solo, I was standing holding the RHS door open, plugged in chatting to him. Unseen by me, a willy-willy dust devil came up behind me across the apron. The only warning was a brief rapid fluttering of my pants (that pants fluttering occurred again a few seconds later....but for other reasons!!), and the next moment the Kiowa door was ripped out my hand, torn off the aircraft and flung about 10M away. Luckily not up into the idling rotor. Inertia and the upset short duration fortunately kept the rotor blades relatively stable. They are vicious.....if you see one on the ground due dust while flying at or close to 500Ft, I suggest avoid it, it can be a violent jolt...   

  • Like 2
  • Agree 1
  • Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...