Jump to content

Recommended Posts

The damage to the firewall forward was probably what saved them as it absorbed most of the impact. This why modern car crashes are more survivable than crashing an older vehicle with strongly built engine area or anything with a full ladder chassis as the entire front end is designed to crumple and absorb the impact.

Link to post
Share on other sites

SO !

A Nissan Micro, having a headon smash with a Toyota LandCruiser, will hurt thse in the Big Toyota MORE.

NOT

From what lv,e witnessed, those little cars Fold all the way back to the rear seats.

Front or rear crash. They just dont hold together well.

In Saudi Arabia, those small cars Are BANNED from their roads, for saftey,s sake.

spacesailor

Link to post
Share on other sites

ANCAP safety ratings are applied to all vehicles now. Obviously size matters as there is more to absorb the impact in a larger vehicle. Early model landcruisers and the like had a very poor safety rating. Modern versions have a very good rating. If you hit a modern car with an old landcruiser, the modern car will crumple absorbing much of the impact and the passengers in the landcruiser may get away with fewer injuries. Hit a tree or concrete wall with an old land cruiser and the result will be dramatically different. Crumple zones are there for a tried and tested reason.

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

You need a distance of crumple zone for most effect. Side impact is always going to be less effective. If you are going really fast, you may die anyhow. Extra speed = more injury. Nev

Link to post
Share on other sites

Generally, when the engine area is that badly crumpled up, you have the engine in your lap and hot exhaust pipes burning your balls. They are very, very lucky people.

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

That plane is certainly a mess.  Doesn't look to be much space left for the occupants. There's an oil tank in there also . Nev

Edited by facthunter
Link to post
Share on other sites

Very Lucky indeed, but looking at the picture, you can see the prop facing the camera and the front of the cowl looks intact - suggests the engine compartment has collapsed to the starboard side of the airframe, and there may be a touch more room than intially thought.

Still, very lucky to be breathing.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, spacesailor said:

SO !

A Nissan Micro, having a headon smash with a Toyota LandCruiser, will hurt thse in the Big Toyota MORE.

NOT

Sounds reasonable, Spacey, but I’ve seen the opposite: lots of injuries, especially in the knee area, to ‘Cruiser drivers in head-ons. Little cars don’t have much in front of you, but their crumple zone design protects you...

and you would be amazed at the level of protection given by front airbags.

 

5 hours ago, spacesailor said:

...In Saudi Arabia, those small cars Are BANNED from their roads, for saftey,s sake.

spacesailor

...Probably because the place is full of yank tanks driven by maniacs.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, facthunter said:

You need a distance of crumple zone for most effect. Side impact is always going to be less effective. If you are going really fast, you may die anyhow. Extra speed = more injury. Nev

Aortic dissection comes to mind......

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Very fortunate to get out of that and going to make full recovery.

Guess it is a game of seconds and mm as a degree here and there at impact could have had a totally different outcome.

Edited by alf jessup
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 29/04/2021 at 10:56 AM, spacesailor said:

SO !

A Nissan Micro, having a headon smash with a Toyota LandCruiser, will hurt thse in the Big Toyota MORE.

NOT

From what lv,e witnessed, those little cars Fold all the way back to the rear seats.

Front or rear crash. They just dont hold together well.

In Saudi Arabia, those small cars Are BANNED from their roads, for saftey,s sake.

spacesailor

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't know how rusted the early Chev was. Plenty if dust came out from sections of it. Nevertheless I would consider the evidence  valid. Those cars have separate platform chassis and the body itself is not that strong and doesn't have  a strong cage for the occupants with strong pillars or a proper crumple zone.. Nev

Link to post
Share on other sites

YES

BUT  defiantly Not a "Micro".

Can we see a " micro" versus a "Landcruiser".

OR

Even a Toyota Corolla, and Landcruiser.

What a bang !.

spacesailor

Link to post
Share on other sites

It may be classified as a classic car but in their day they were not well built with bolt on panels so they could change the model every 6 months. The wrap around screen was a knee cracker and the ergonomics of the drivers position was awful (short arms and long legs) as well as atrocious handling with a floating soft ride that made passengers sea sick, the boot was only about a foot deep with a giant spare tyre in the middle. OK on a straight flat freeway but don't try to go round corners.

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The old Bel Air was also built from mild steel - whereas todays vehicles are built from high tensile steel. Kind of like the difference between a mild steel fastener and an AN fastener.

Then there's the engineered design introduced into door pillars and roof and floor panels, whereby they are designed to provide a protective cage for occupants - while the occupants are protected by soft padded interiors, collapsible steering columns, airbags, and a lack of sharp edges and pointy levers and sharp knobs.

 

The steering column in older cars (before the late 1960's) killed most drivers in serious head-on crashes. I can recall one T-bone crash where an unrestrained passenger (no seatbelts) got the column gear lever through their skull.

 

But at the end of the day, it's the deceleration forces that kill most people. A Landcruiser doesn't decelerate like a Nissan Micro does, in a head-on smash, so the Micro driver and passengers are at a disadvantage, even if both vehicles are equipped similarly with safety features.

 

The test crash of a Mercedes Smart car at a speed of 70mph into a concrete barrier shows the successfulness of modern "controlled-crumple" design - but the occupants would been dead from deceleration forces that tear aortas. All the action starts at 5:20 mins in, if you can't spare the time to watch the video right through.

 

 

 

  • Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Why do they turn them to the side, making one corner hit first ?.

The Smart car,s RF wheel dosn,t look damaged.

spacesailor

Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of old cars we might consider classic and wonderful to own are so common in the states they happily use them as scrap. My mate in L.A. had a few 1977 Cadillac's that would make great wedding cars here but over there, they were everywhere and dirt cheap.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Why do they turn them to the side, making one corner hit first ?.

Because that is the major test method of cabin "cage" integrity.

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Re the cars, I attended a crash between a Fiat 500, and aHolden Commodore. 
Both occupants of the Fiat were driven home by their husbands, both occupants of the Commodore went to hospital.

 

Modern small cars are surprisingly safe.

 

here’s an old video from the Pommy TV show 5th Gear.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=emtLLvXrrFs

 

I’ve worked as a Paramedic for nearly 30 years, and one of the changes I’ve seen, in the early 90s, most accidents required the fire brigade to cut people out of cars, they were not always seriously injured, but doors would not open, extrication was difficult.

 

Now, the fire brigade is rarely required. 
please do not underestimate the advances in vehicle engineering.

 

 

  • Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I will stick with my old Landcruisers, if nothing else......I have MASS and that helps 🙂

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...