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Go-around goes wrong for CTSW (Müncheberg • July '20)


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Somehow both occupants escaped serious injury.

(The title at the beginning of the film apparently says that the video - owned by the airport authorities - may only be used for pilot education.)

 

 

 

 

BILD     TWO INJURED IN BRANDENBURG

Small plane crashes into tower!

 

07/19/2020   [Auto-translation]

Here is an airplane hanging in the tower!

Müncheberg - A small airplane flew into the tower of the airfield there in Müncheberg, east of Berlin - and initially got stuck. The two occupants of the plane - father and son - were lucky in the misfortune on Sunday.

They were rescued by emergency services and flown to hospitals in helicopters. The 68-year-old pilot and his 46-year-old son were injured, said a police spokeswoman. How severe the injuries were initially remained unclear.

The cause of the collision of the microlight aircraft at Eggersdorf airfield in a district of Müncheberg (Märkisch-Oderland district) also remained open for the time being. This is to be found out during an aircraft accident investigation. According to the police, the experts were on site on Sunday.

According to BILD information, the aircraft had taken off from the airfield shortly before and had completed some sightseeing flights over the site.

No other people were injured. There was a man in the tower at the time of the collision, but he was unharmed. The shell of the tower was not damaged, windows were not broken.

The aircraft could not be recovered at first. "It's still hanging up there on the tower," said the police spokeswoman.

The reason is that the microlight has a missile as part of a rescue system that is activated in an emergency landing. An ammunition recovery service is on site to secure and remove them.

The former military airfield has been a special airfield since this year and no longer a commercial airfield, only certain users are allowed to land there. According to the airfield, the tower was only built in 2013.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

 

Somehow both occupants escaped serious injury.

(The title at the beginning of the film apparently says that the video - owned by the airport authorities - may only be used for pilot education.)

 

1333642753_CTSWintoTower.thumb.jpg.1d69ae814f7638cbf5b0c985a9bd4551.jpg

 

 

 

 

BILD     TWO INJURED IN BRANDENBURG

Small plane crashes into tower!

 

07/19/2020   [Auto-translation]

Here is an airplane hanging in the tower!

Müncheberg - A small airplane flew into the tower of the airfield there in Müncheberg, east of Berlin - and initially got stuck. The two occupants of the plane - father and son - were lucky in the misfortune on Sunday.

They were rescued by emergency services and flown to hospitals in helicopters. The 68-year-old pilot and his 46-year-old son were injured, said a police spokeswoman. How severe the injuries were initially remained unclear.

The cause of the collision of the microlight aircraft at Eggersdorf airfield in a district of Müncheberg (Märkisch-Oderland district) also remained open for the time being. This is to be found out during an aircraft accident investigation. According to the police, the experts were on site on Sunday.

According to BILD information, the aircraft had taken off from the airfield shortly before and had completed some sightseeing flights over the site.

No other people were injured. There was a man in the tower at the time of the collision, but he was unharmed. The shell of the tower was not damaged, windows were not broken.

The aircraft could not be recovered at first. "It's still hanging up there on the tower," said the police spokeswoman.

The reason is that the microlight has a missile as part of a rescue system that is activated in an emergency landing. An ammunition recovery service is on site to secure and remove them.

The former military airfield has been a special airfield since this year and no longer a commercial airfield, only certain users are allowed to land there. According to the airfield, the tower was only built in 2013.

 

 

Edited by Garfly
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If there was no fault in the elevator control system these people should never pilot an aircraft in the future.

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Posted (edited)

[Mods, sorry, somehow I managed to post 2 versions of this. This one is the improved version and, if possible, the other one could be deleted.]

 

BTW Something that caught my eye in the news report was that the wreckage had to be left where it was until explosives experts made the BRS safe.

 

Edited by Garfly
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Landed in a stalled condition and then continued to apply full back stick and full power - the "God get me out of here" reaction.

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Bet that bloke with the Sierra & the Ferris wheel at Old Bar doesn't feel so alone anymore!😛

Edited by KRviator
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If I'd have seen that video out of its proper context, I'd have sworn it was created in a simulator with pretty poor physics modelling. 

I just wouldn't have thought an aeroplane could move through the air like that.

2 hours ago, pmccarthy said:

Landed in a stalled condition and then continued to apply full back stick and full power - the "God get me out of here" reaction.

Yeah, looking at the mysterious mistakes of others through a Human Factors lens, at least makes for a useful learning opportunity. 

What panic can do to normal competence is the joker in the pack of the airmanship game.  And it's not, after all, something you can readily practise.

 

Top of one's emergency memory check-list: Keep Calm and Carry On Aviating!

 

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Not sure how to practice not panicking. 😛 When I was still learning but up to solo work, I managed to bump the throttle in a bit while landing. Panicked when the aircraft was not stopping, I did what any car driver would do and put my foot on the brake… Immediate left turn and off runway excursion resulted, but thankfully no damage was done. If you’d have asked me what I’d do in that situation, I’m pretty sure that pressing the left rudder pedal would not have been high on my list. 🙄

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Hmm good quality balustrade !

 

It didn't look windy. 

 

Pulled on too much pitch too early, stalled, did not stick forward, but  then applied WOT but didn't release pitch ? so the plane flying OOC in a power on stall, more like   was looking like a STOL contest ?

Where is his instructor ?

Fortunately we don't see too much that is this bad.

I get annoyed when I see this because it doesn't do anything for us in the public's eyes.

 

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Apparently it was a father and son aboard, so I suppose the family is even more annoyed when they see it. But the title at the beginning of the film warns that any use of the film outside of pilot education, is a breach of the airfield operator's copyright; put there partly, I suppose, for that very reason - as well as to protect what remained of the pilots privacy in the matter. (Yes, shades of Old Bar ferris wheels. We can only hope that our own worst screw-ups don't get recorded.) So with a bit of luck the amateur aviators of the world will be held safe from still more public contempt.

 

On the other hand, our estimation in the eyes of tower operators, world wide, has surely taken a hit.

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I think the Old Bar ferris wheel was a diferent category, cause etc. 

 

It might have been recoverable (after the in-ground effect stall ) if the stick had been let come back to neutral  at WOT. . maybe a bit of stick forward , as required, to counter any nose up tendency with the flaps out.....ie a in ugly transition from a power-on stall back into level flight inches above the runway. maybe.  it depends just how much the speed decayed in the stall.  There was a panic and stick held back in panic I guess. Pilot learned basic instincts (stick forward) did not prevail. 

Edited by RFguy
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6 minutes ago, RFguy said:

I think the Old Bar ferris wheel was a diferent category, cause etc. 

 

Yeah, true ... I was thinking more about the public shaming aspects; irrespective of cause or justification.

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The A/C wasn't stalled until the very last few seconds when it started to drop away at point of impact otherwise it would have not climbed & got there in the first place! It was no doubt very close or on the stall speed which is still a flyable speed.

Edited by Flightrite
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I reckon he/she was caught by a gust, the wind sock did stick out as he/she touched down.

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11 hours ago, Jabiru7252 said:

I reckon he/she was caught by a gust, the wind sock did stick out as he/she touched down.

I have heard of this gust of wind thing before but do not understand how it causes the aircraft to pitch up violently. From the landing bounce to tower impact takes about 6 seconds, a fast person can run about 50 metres in that time.

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7 hours ago, Thruster88 said:

I have heard of this gust of wind thing before but do not understand how it causes the aircraft to pitch up violently. From the landing bounce to tower impact takes about 6 seconds, a fast person can run about 50 metres in that time.

Full flap on the CTSW is 40 degrees.

If you are coming in for a touch and go with 40 degrees flap, and forget to retract, then give it full throttle, will the nose head for the sky?

 

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nose up ? I dont think so  if you are onto the stick like a tiger and arrest it if it tries to...

 

application of a  full power step I would think would be more likely to provoke that.

 

I would think those flaps would normally move centre of lift aft slightly.  nose over a bit , 

but then the airflow over the elevator changes, also. 

 

It looked like a stall to me   because at the initial nose up, it looked like poor roll control -IE stalled outer wings .... (or suboptimal pilot technique),

only looked at it once..

 

 

 

 

 

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48 minutes ago, turboplanner said:

Full flap on the CTSW is 40 degrees.

If you are coming in for a touch and go with 40 degrees flap, and forget to retract, then give it full throttle, will the nose head for the sky?

 

Turns,

My guess it will but that is why you have a control column or stick for, I was taught to tell the plane what you want to do and not have it dictate to you.

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I had to go around just after touch down in my Jab. Full flaps and the trim was full back, as expected. The tendency for the nose to pitch up is quite noticeable.

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6 minutes ago, alf jessup said:

Turns,

My guess it will but that is why you have a control column or stick for, I was taught to tell the plane what you want to do and not have it dictate to you.

I’ve had the same experience as 7252. The nose was coming up, I realised what I’d done and had to force the stick forward until I had enough height to raise the flaps a bit. A pilot caught unaware could easily get out of control.

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34 minutes ago, turboplanner said:

I’ve had the same experience as 7252. The nose was coming up, I realised what I’d done and had to force the stick forward until I had enough height to raise the flaps a bit. A pilot caught unaware could easily get out of control.

Turbs, 

Yep a 172 with full flap was a handful back in my training days in the mid 80’s when you did a go around, quite a few lives have been lost with the seats either failing or not being locked in properly.

Takes a hell of a lot of effort when it pitches up.

Alf

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