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concrete floor pressure KingAir 350 ?


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The couple getting married need advice. Their brains are probably in short circuit mode  They say there's a chemical that reduces the female Libido and it's in  wedding cake. Nev

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A typical light industrial slab is 125-150mm thick and reinforced with a single layer of SL72, SL82 or perhaps SL92 mesh laid about 40mm down from the top surface. The edges should be thickened to abo

The couple getting married need advice. Their brains are probably in short circuit mode  They say there's a chemical that reduces the female Libido and it's in  wedding cake. Nev

All concrete can bend and reinforced concrete is load carrying. It does not need to be pre stressed or post tensioned. those processes only increase the load carrying ability. As far as bending g

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13 minutes ago, facthunter said:

The couple getting married need advice. Their brains are probably in short circuit mode  They say there's a chemical that reduces the female Libido and it's in  wedding cake. Nev

 

Total thread drift - but what amuses me about catholic weddings is the need to get advice from a priest first.  Naturally the best person to give advice on married life is someone who will stay single their whole life and is (supposedly) celibate...

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I think that's only to push the need to have the children in the catholic way. Churches generally have no real idea about sex. It's only a trick to get you to procreate and it's not for fun.. Priests can't marry or the church would have to support the children and that'd divert funds. They are inflexible with this unlike Spacies cement boat . There .. That's back to topic. 

Nev

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All concrete can bend and reinforced concrete is load carrying. It does not need to be pre stressed or post tensioned. those processes only increase the load carrying ability.

As far as bending goes I have watched an 80' chimney in very high wind bend and twist.

The way the reinforcing is placed controls the way concrete will bend.

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A typical light industrial slab is 125-150mm thick and reinforced with a single layer of SL72, SL82 or perhaps SL92 mesh laid about 40mm down from the top surface. The edges should be thickened to about 300 mm deep with a layer of L8 or L11 trench mesh in the bottom. That should be fine for a something like a Kingair. The more important thing is what is under the slab and how well it's compacted. That's where you need to get some local engineering advice on how to prepare the subgrade and what sort of slab you need. I've seen loaded concrete trucks drive on 100mm thick shopping centre slabs that were just a week old with no issues. I've also seen 300mm thick slabs break up after a short time in service.

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No water or tree roots underneath Don't just dismiss the hotmix. Concrete is a lot of money. If you use concrete do it in sections to reduce cracking. 15 meters of slab will crack Eventually. There's furious agreement on the need for a stable and compacted substrate. If it's clay or some other crap there you  might have to remove some and mix stuff into it  and compact it the same as you must do  with a road. Nev

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It has a workshop, and also hangar area. It might get done piecemeal anyway Nev , depends what I can afford in what stages... 

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If you are going to pour it right to the corrugated Iron be sure to use stakes to stop the sheets moving out under the pressure. Looks really crap if that happens. Bag it so you don't slip on the surface, Plastic sheet under to stop water and salt rising. Do you need a section to wash parts? You can put a slope there and a drain pipe. Nev

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pour it in square or nearly square sections, with plain steel bars running from the poured slab into the next section. that stops any uneven subsidence. 6m square is quite large enough for a pour. One of the good things is that you use the already poured slab as formwork for the adjacent slabs.

I am about twenty years out of date with estimating for this kind of job, but as someone said hotmix is a good alternative to concrete. It won't crack as concrete can if not treated correctly and also is reasonably easy to repair. Good road base can also provide a good floor, especially if you overlay it with old carpet as I have done in my hangar.

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Iron Ore prices the past 12 months have sent  the steel for hangars cost skyrocketing. 

But its back on its way down

Futures market  price for Jan, feb March is back down at $120.

 

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Yenn, you are an engineer of my vintage. We learned how to calculate buildings with maths.

Buggered if I know what they teach these days. Computers are so much better that I was.  At Adelaide, they sacked the maths dept from contributing to engineering stuff.

The last time I tried to help a son-in-law, it was sooo much easier to do a google thing than to do it my old way, but I did both just for old times sake.

And yes, to stay on topic, we sure did reinforced concrete and soil mechanics.

There has been some good advice given out on this topic.

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I suggested 6m square, not 6sq. metres. A big difference. The actual size would depend upon the total area to be poured. For example my 12 by 9 hangar would be poured in 4 by 3 sections. I don't know what they tought in the nineties, but some engineers had no idea of what was what and others where good. I even came across a bloke with a masters degree from I think it was Stalingrad, who didn't even know which side of a retaining wall was in tension and which was in compression.

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yeah I meant 6x6 ....at 6x6x0.15 = 5.4. hangar is 19mx35m so would probable do partials 2 lots of  9.5 or 3 lots of  6.3333333
depends what is required to get occupancy cert. anyway, hangar will go up. 

 

 

 

 

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actually 19m wide, 35 deep. the blocks of 25x50m. there must be a 15m setback from the taxiway to the front of the hangar.

Unfortunately, the council , in my opinion, has some requirements that inflate the cost, such as pretty facades on the front of the building, a califormia bungalow roof set.  etc etc.

No square boxes allowed...

 

Its a good example why no new hangars have been built when they have to meet some costly and non essential requirements. 

 

 

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Don't make it so you have to get a lot of planes out to get the one from the back.  I never like others moving my plane or hangar rashing it. Nev

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And that is what will limit what I can put in the hangar.. although there is a 5.5m ceiling (well 5.5m to the bottom of the trusses)  so one could stack LSAs with a forklift and bays. 

the idea is I have two planes in the back, and I can fit a customer's plane in front.

Yes, wide and shallow is far more multi airplane friendly. or the T style (front / rear alternate opening like at CBR airport hangars) 

 

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I'd forget the forklift bit. Yes a long front with doors which open  on most of it works ok.(slide). Make sure the wind calculations are for high winds because these days you could get a twister anywhere. It's hard to brace a wide door structure if the opening goes right to the wall. Nev

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Well the biggest issue I have with multi panel is the seals. I need dust tight as much as possible. 

 

That actually might be easier by positive pressurizing the building.  Solar derived power  is cheap. 

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 Any type of door has sealing problems especially of the dimensions a hangar needs. The multi panels has plenty of hinges and is easily sealed at those points. The lower face is like a roller door. Descends vertically at closure (easy enough but must be swept clean. and close fully.) Up the top you might have to fit a flexible rubber gap filler/seal. Nev.

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