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My concern with 2 pack on rivetted   alloy sheet is removing it  when you want to re do it. Corrosive paint removers are out when you have sheet laps and rivets. You cannot blend in a small repair. I used A-Cran when it first came out and it's nearly as hard a bath enamel and it's got to be over a suitable hard undercoat or it chips badly when  small stones etc impact it. Nev

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I bought a HVLP spray kit off Ebay for just over $30.00 which included 2 guns, 1 for touch up and small items & the other full sized both with gravity fed paint delivery all in a nice blow moulded

First of all I'm not an expert painter by any standard. Painted several cars and several aircraft, with variable results but mostly very satisfactory. Not trying to make 'show pony' standard, jus

Keep your plane in HIGH Vis colours and you are easier to see. Nev

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5 hours ago, onetrack said:

I have never had any problems using the German 2 pack paints. But you may want to ask the Glasurit dealer/agent if they have specific aircraft paints.

 

https://tech-info.glasurit.com/en_UK/CV_VOC/924-68.pdf

 

The Glasurit Tech Adviser came up with 68 as the most likely to meet my requirements. Inters tingly way cheaper than the car/automotive ones they sell. I would guess not so many colour/shad/effects variations.

 

Of course application technique, will have a lot to do with final finish quality and weight - this goes for every manually applied paint .

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Automotive enamel with hardener added. Sticks well, covers well, light weight, good gloss with hardener, easy to touchup, low cost. Fairly impervious to fuel with hardener added.

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5 hours ago, JG3 said:

Automotive enamel with hardener added. Sticks well, covers well, light weight, good gloss with hardener, easy to touchup, low cost. Fairly impervious to fuel with hardener added.

Could I please get some more info from you JG?  Any recommended brand / type, mixing ratio etc.  I want to paint the plane hopefully this summer.  Probably white with blue trim.

 

Thanks, Marty

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Could I please get some more info from you JG?  Any recommended brand / type, mixing ratio etc.  I want to paint the plane hopefully this summer.  Probably white with blue trim.

 

I don't have details about brands and ratio of hardener. I just go to a good paint shop that supplies the automotive respray market, and tell them what I need to do, and they should know the best combo. They tend to be experienced professionals as distinct from those that supply the domestic market.

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That's what I did. They will have sales people but usually also have someone who knows all the different paints and coatings. Luckily at the place I went to, the manager was an industrial chemist so his advice was gold.

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On 25/09/2021 at 12:29 PM, kgwilson said:

That's what I did. They will have sales people but usually also have someone who knows all the different paints and coatings. Luckily at the place I went to, the manager was an industrial chemist so his advice was gold.

What kind of paint did the industrial chemist recommend?

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On 24/09/2021 at 8:18 PM, Thruster88 said:

This one doesn't need paint,

  https://www.facebook.com/groups/aircraft.for.sale.australia/permalink/2981368825437498/?sale_post_id=2981368825437498

It would be the perfect aircraft for you Skippy.😁

Not a "Facebook" participant so comment completely lost on me - perhaps you would  provide the information you allude to. 

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2 hours ago, eightyknots said:

What kind of paint did the industrial chemist recommend?

The stuff I used. See my post on page 1.

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I used two pack polyurethane on the RV4 and only a very thin coat on the wings. I later put on a finishing coat, but for some reason it didn't harden properly. If a piece of cloth was left on the top of the wing, it would stick very slightly so you could feel the drag as you pulled it off. The paint supplier had no answer as to why. I ended up using MEK and washing the coat off, then left it for ages before having another go. It took an awful amount of work to swab the faulty paint off and was never a good job afterwards. I would go with automotive finish if I ever had to do it again. We do not go into the high cold temps which is the downfall of auto paint.

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No  one's yet told me how you get 2 pack off when you want to repaint. I reckon savage paint strippers are out with thin Al skins rivets and laps Nev

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I am not intending to ever try to get the paint off. After 7 years it still has a good gloss though there are some scratches and a few stone chips on the spats. I think the only way would be mechanical by sanding it down to the undercoat or near to it. It would be a very time consuming job. One of my wing tanks developed a pin hole leak & I had to remove a bottom wing panel to repair it. Drilling all the rivets out wasn't difficult. I painted all the new rivets by mixing up a small amount of 2 pack and used a fine artists paint brush to put a small blob on the rivet head and spread it over the head to the edges. It looks as good as the original. 

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I used to use Glasurit base coat paint on all my RC turbine jets...lovely paint to use and great coverage with small amount of paint..the killer is to be careful with how much clear coat you put on. Thats what gains the weight...Often they paint 5 and 8 coats of clear. But if your careful then the very light coat then a heavier coat after it tacks off and your done. Glasurit is great but expensive also...from what I have seen lately though all good auto paints are getting very expensive now

 

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Base coat plus clear is what is used these days and it's pretty thick and hard to repair and match. The clear doesn't take a lot of sun for long. Nev

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2 hours ago, Kyle Communications said:

I used to use Glasurit base coat paint on all my RC turbine jets...lovely paint to use and great coverage with small amount of paint..the killer is to be careful with how much clear coat you put on. Thats what gains the weight...Often they paint 5 and 8 coats of clear. But if your careful then the very light coat then a heavier coat after it tacks off and your done. Glasurit is great but expensive also...from what I have seen lately though all good auto paints are getting very expensive now

 

Glasurit 68 (a commercial vehicle paint) is formulated so as not to require a clear coat - one of its many attractive features, along with being much less costly than car paints

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Boatcraft Pacific sell what they call Aquacote - a water-based two-part polyurethane.  They recommend their undercoat which dries white, and sands easily.  The top coat is thin and watery, so 2 or 3 coats is required.  However I did my entire fuselage with only 250ml of the stuff.  Dries as hard as rock.  Also not cheap.

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Motospray Quickstrip Paint Remover will remove 2 pack paints without damaging the likes of Aluminium sheeting. There are many road vehicles that utilise aluminium panels (Landrovers and Rangerovers were first, but numerous brands have followed), so the problems of stripping paint from aluminium is not confined to aircraft - although it's patently obvious you must not damage aluminium panels on aircraft in any way.

Thus, using power abrasion to remove paint from aircraft panels is the least desirable method, particularly for thin aluminium sheeting - and be very aware of the danger of abrading rivet heads.

 

A lot of good advice in this old thread, particularly from Guest ozzie ....

 

 

 

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On 23/09/2021 at 1:56 PM, onetrack said:

I have not used Glasurit 68 specifically - but I have used other very similar German 2 pack paints. Note that Glasurit 68 is a 2 pack specifically designed for commercial vehicles and commercial vehicle bodies.

Accordingly, it will be a very durable paint - but it will likely be a thicker coating paint when finished, as compared to specific aviation paints.

I note the tech specs quote a 40 to 60 micron film build thickness, but no final thickness indication.

I don't know how the final thickness of Glasurit 68 compares to specific aircraft paints, but I wouldn't be surprised to find the specific aircraft paints are designed to have a thinner level of coating.

I note that in one Boeing document, Boeing quote their aircraft paint thickness as "3.5 to 5 mil" (89 to 127 micron).

As well as durability, a good coating thickness is desirable for commercial vehicles, the paint weight is not considered in this designed application.

Glasurit is a product of BASF and made in Germany, and the name is highly respected. I have never had any problems using the German 2 pack paints. But you may want to ask the Glasurit dealer/agent if they have specific aircraft paints.

 

https://tech-info.glasurit.com/en_UK/CV_VOC/924-68.pdf

 

Thanks Onetrack - Glasurit 68 is the Galsurit Tech staffs recommendation. They tell me it has a particularity high density/particulate count, so very good coverage at low/thin thickness - however this would depend, very much, on the skill of the applicator.

 

The Tech people have also recommended using a  "wet on wet 284-90". I understand this to be a way of assisting adhesion and minimising top coat application.

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A lot of paints you apply wet on wet or else let it dry and have to sand the lot to get adhesion for each subsequent coat.. Alkyd enamel cannot be cut and polished very well and takes a while to be fully hard. . Nev

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4 hours ago, facthunter said:

A lot of paints you apply wet on wet or else let it dry and have to sand the lot to get adhesion for each subsequent coat.. Alkyd enamel cannot be cut and polished very well and takes a while to be fully hard. . Nev

Nev; I have experience in applying subsequent coats of paint, when the last is at the tacky stage. This "wet on wet 284-90" would seem to be something a little different, as its an undercoat that is applied as a fine/mist coat, allowed to take off and then followed by the first pass of the top coat.

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Yes, you can do it with the undercoat. I usually use a thin etch first. I've given up on primer -surfacers. They are too soft and make the final coat CHIP easily. Nev

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Now for another crazy off the planet paint idea 🙂. My Thruster came with a spare set of skins,  I need to somehow get them tested to see IF they are serviceable.  IF they are OK I was going to try and ‘paint’ them with this paint scheme.

So, any ideas IF this would be doable?

 

659D52C7-082B-4FBD-B427-45E4151C6561.jpeg

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No idea Jack - I would guess, it would be desirable to know that the solvents in the paint didn't "eat" the fabric (chemical compatibility) and that the paint used, had sufficient plasticisers to flex (rather than crack) with the fabric.

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