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Flying a 19 reg Jabiru with a ga license?


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My son has a Lancair, and according to most , has done a harder training course to fly his VH Lancair with retracts.

Here's my question.... could he ( in theory ) fly my Jabiru solo? What are the legalities?

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Ask RAA.

MANY GA pilots have come unstuck on low inertia aircraft.

The training syllabus is different.

The requirement is for a Pilot Certificate, which he can train for (again for what it's worth a lot of GA pilots require several hours of training.

 

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He probably could fly the Jabiru but not legally. The minimum conversion is 5 hours with a suitably accredited RA-Aus Instructor of which at least 1 must be solo. It could just be 1 with the instructor & 4 solo depending on the pilot but a CFI must sign off the final flight check. 

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17 hours ago, kgwilson said:

He probably could fly the Jabiru but not legally. The minimum conversion is 5 hours with a suitably accredited RA-Aus Instructor of which at least 1 must be solo. It could just be 1 with the instructor & 4 solo depending on the pilot but a CFI must sign off the final flight check. 

That’s correct  . A pilot friend of mine who held a ATPL and flew B 747’s had to do his 5 hrs to get his RAA cert. 

 

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IF you'd flown Jabiru's under a GA licence it would be a waste of time  doing the flying on a similar plane. I chose the SB Drifter to get the max benefit although  it flew much like  a Tiger moth which I'd remained relatively current on..Just do engine  failures and then more engine failures and the Pax endorsement and a bit of solo. Time will fly.. I've had a few Airline associates who carry on a bit about the time required but there are more important things to get revved up about. . IF it's your first tailwheel,  you'll need the time and more to  learn about winds/grass/mud outlandings etc..Nev

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18 hours ago, Bruce Tuncks said:

My son has a Lancair, and according to most , has done a harder training course to fly his VH Lancair with retracts.

Here's my question.... could he ( in theory ) fly my Jabiru solo? What are the legalities?

In the UK the SK is classed as a Group A so it is legal to fly it with a PPL or NPPL with SEP endorsement.  It is strange that with my NPPL (microlight) I cannot legally fly the SK which is an identical aircraft but does not meet the stall speed requirement for a microlight.

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I learnt on a C150, flew aircraft from C150 / 6 seater retractable through to Mooney and most recently a C152.  What a lot of BS that you can only fly light or heavy.  I am sure that I could fly a single seat 500lb craft.  Backed off from buying a Teeney Two after a report of flying them as being a " religious experience".  

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I'm very cautious in real life. Once I turned down a chance to fly a Gruneau Baby vintage glider. I was worried that I might do a real bad landing and I didn't like the lack of crash protection and the upright seating position.

Another time, I turned down the chance to be passenger for a Chipmunk aerobatic flight. I was worried about the 60 year-old mainspar and whether it had any corrosion or not.

What a coward, I hear you guys thinking....

 

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The Mainspar is "lifed". It fatigues.  VNE  is not very high on a Chipmunk. You'll reach it easily in a vertical dive in no time at all.  I dodge bad weather too. Better to be a live chicken than a dead hero.  Nev

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Just for clarification, it's the "centre section" of the spar which can be replaced but nothing's cheap on a chipmunk airframe. Don't land hard on the tailwheel either It can deform and jamb the elevator full up. Looks like a real aeroplane though. It's the first plane I actually trained on and I never fully trusted it's spin recovery predictability. DID a LOT of spins in them but always ready in case it was reluctant to come out.   Nev

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18 hours ago, Bruce Tuncks said:

I'm very cautious in real life. Once I turned down a chance to fly a Gruneau Baby vintage glider. I was worried that I might do a real bad landing and I didn't like the lack of crash protection and the upright seating position.

Another time, I turned down the chance to be passenger for a Chipmunk aerobatic flight. I was worried about the 60 year-old mainspar and whether it had any corrosion or not.

What a coward, I hear you guys thinking....

 

I don't think it's being a coward. Living your life out while flying is something most pilots do. The reason they get to  live so long, not even with injuries is making choices.

In your case you removed two possibilities of an early demise;  "if you don't do it, it can't go wrong" is the safest action of all.

 

 

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22 hours ago, facthunter said:

Just for clarification, it's the "centre section" of the spar which can be replaced but nothing's cheap on a chipmunk airframe. Don't land hard on the tailwheel either It can deform and jamb the elevator full up. Looks like a real aeroplane though. It's the first plane I actually trained on and I never fully trusted it's spin recovery predictability. DID a LOT of spins in them but always ready in case it was reluctant to come out.   Nev

I learnt on Chippies too and also did lots of spins - what a 16 YO called fun. That said, I remember the "loose coin" accident.

 

Spins/aeros in gliders ding the enjoyment bell.

 

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