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Another NEW Savannah S on it's way in NZ

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wouldnt you start from the middle of those curved sections and work your way out? I would have it all clecoed first and do one cleco and rivet at a time...but any advice would be appreciated as we will soon be doing this

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wouldnt you start from the middle of those curved sections and work your way out? I would have it all clecoed first and do one cleco and rivet at a time...but any advice would be appreciated as we will soon be doing this

Kyle, I started in the middle and clecoed every other hole, then riveted from the middle out, then removed the clecoes and did it again, worked perfectly.

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wouldnt you start from the middle of those curved sections and work your way out? I would have it all clecoed first and do one cleco and rivet at a time...but any advice would be appreciated as we will soon be doing this

With side, top and bottom skins in place, I clekoed an upper curved section on along it's entire upper edge (the full length of the rear fuse).

I then curved and clekoed it down at the front (widest) end and worked back to the tail. The very first cleko in this run went in maybe the 5th hole back, rather than the very first hole: this holds the section square on the frame right from the get go, and is less vulnerable than first hole.

No clekoes went into the curved frame corners at this stage, just the upper and lower long edges, every 2nd or 3rd hole. I used all my copper clekos (450?)

It went so cleanly and easily, it was a real pleasure to do.

 

And the same applied to the little curved skins at the front: I just clekoed along the upper edge, bent the thing down and clekoed the bottom edge: quick and easy!

 

Riveting is done from the middle (frame 6), out towards the front and the tail:

I started in the side middle of the this frame, riveting up and down to the curved sections, then along the curved sections, upper and lower, towards the front and the tail. Each time riveting approached the next frame, I would rivet that from it's centre, up and down to the curved sections. And so on.

 

I believe I did one side then the other, then top then bottom. If you like riveting marathons, you're going to love this!

All holes were perfectly aligned except some at the curved frame corners, but these are easily enough podgered. These went in last of all, but I had to redo some of them after misjudging the gun position (working down and round the corner too far) and so putting in several with raised edges.

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wouldnt you start from the middle of those curved sections and work your way out? I would have it all clecoed first and do one cleco and rivet at a time...but any advice would be appreciated as we will soon be doing this

 

I found I couldn't get the middle to curve around the corner because it fought me on both sides. I think I got into trouble starting on the big end working to the rear, but I can't clearly remember. It is quite a while ago now...isn't it?

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I did think this and the wing leading edge are two places that would be three times easier with two people until you get it pinned down in shape.

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Next Savannah Question:

My kit has the old style torque tube with the dogleg, and the elevator horn riding on it.

I have this fitted, with the elevator rod that runs from the bottom of the control stick to the elevator horn.

 

With the stick in or near the mid position, the elevator rod fouls the top of the undercarriage tunnel at the lower point of it's operation.

Another local build has the same situation.

 

I have instructions for both old and new style torque tubes etc. I see the elevator horn was SS026 for the old, is ST386 for the new. My elevator horn had no number attached, but I wonder if I have the wrong one?

 

Has anyone else struck this?

 

Thanks.

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Thank you, Guy. Great pics, and such a tidy build!

I have also moved my torque tube forward a bit, as the rear of the dogleg in it was hitting the lip on the back longeron where it rotates.

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[ATTACH=full]50048[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=full]50049[/ATTACH]

The bottom rod needs a slight bend to clear the tunnel.

 

That's a nice clear picture and illustrates what is needed well. Thanks Guy.

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...This all slows and takes the pleasure out of the build, not only in correcting mistakes, but in that the builder is constantly trying to judge and second-guess the info he does have, while moving slowly and uncertainly to try and avoid further mistakes.

 

There are 2 things with these manuals (and I have written a few ops manuals, but nowadays put all that effort into intuitive controls that don't need a manual):

First, writing them is an arduous business, requiring a specific set of skills and abilities. It used to be a profession (technical author) and maybe still is.

Second, translation used to be done only into the native language of the translator. That seems to have gone by the board nowadays, and this manual is a perfect example of the result.

 

I fear the worst. Many builders have posted on here or told me that the ICP leaves a lot to be desired.

 

In readiness for my build later this year, I am acquiring a number of items. I recently bought an air compressor. Fortunately, I have a good understanding how an air compressor works because the Sino-English translation makes it impossible for me to understand how the machine works:

155517142_Chinglishdescriptionofcompressor.thumb.jpg.cb59d4137fc0275fff10b6c0821454fc.jpg

 

I hope the translation of the Savannah's build manual won't be this bad!

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I fear the worst. Many builders have posted on here or told me that the ICP leaves a lot to be desired.

 

In readiness for my build later this year, I am acquiring a number of items. I recently bought an air compressor. Fortunately, I have a good understanding how an air compressor works because the Sino-English translation makes it impossible for me to understand how the machine works:

[ATTACH=full]50285[/ATTACH]

 

I hope the translation of the Savannah's build manual won't be this bad!

 

Darn.........I wish I'd bought the bent axle model. These rotation sports with reciprocating motion and original motive through entering sound a heap more fun than my compressor is having..........(

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I had exactly the same problem and posted what you posted and was told by the guru to get brutal so I did, eventually I got it to fit but Crikey it wasn't easy and a few times I had to walked away for a day to recollect Lol and then come back to it to persevere. I used large multi grips with a hollow pipe on the handle to get leverage and twisted the SS to get the holes to line up.

 

It was doable but Crikey and good luck :smile:

One of mine went in easily - the other will require at least one nights sleep. Interestingly the tunnel seems to be warped being 8 mm difference in the top of the cap from the done side to the none done side. (Measured front and back from a side wall component.) I'm not sure if it is the result of getting one side in or a slightly warped tunnel.

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Good morning,

I am not sure at what stage of building process you are at ,

I have been flying Savannah VG and S for a while 4 years and 550 hours

Doing my own maintenance ( most of it) I have a few comments.

If you are interested please send me an email to [email protected]

Recently got my website going you are welome to have a look www.worldbeneathmywings.com

 

Regards

 

George

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Thank you, Guy. Great pics, and such a tidy build!

I have also moved my torque tube forward a bit, as the rear of the dogleg in it was hitting the lip on the back longeron where it rotates.

 

I had this problem but found that it only strikes the frame when moved beyond it's intended operation throw so the problem went away once the control surfaces were connected.

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I had this problem but found that it only strikes the frame when moved beyond it's intended operation throw so the problem went away once the control surfaces were connected.

 

That's good to know.

 

I can't wait to start my build.

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That's good to know.

 

I can't wait to start my build.

Hi 80 do you write these bits of good info in your build manual on the respective page? Thats what I did on the build I did and put a note about where the info came from. Helped me alot. Cheers and Happy New Year.

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Over a year since I've been here, but moving forward now. One side of the workshop stacked while the other is full of DIY paint bay tent.

I've been learning the hard way with the painting, but have a few more clues than when I started, and am now getting results I am quite happy with, if not what you'd call professional.

Wings, struts, flaperons and all empennage painting complete.

A few small parts, plus the doors, to go.

Then it's the fuselage, which I am going to rotisserie: I found the painting goes much easier and better if the surface I am painting allows me to see what's actually happening. And one plus of a steel framed shed with a wooden floor is that it lends itself to the quick construction of painting jigs.

 

The fuselage will then stay in the paint bay, which will greatly free up the workshop space.

Happy times..........)DSCF1874.thumb.JPG.5ff50eb20393377a8bdec1f040361b5e.JPG

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I am happy for you that you are nearing completion. I hope the painting goes well.

 

I am at the other end of construction, namely the beginning. I am deburring three sets of parts of my plane: the fin, the rudder and the rudder extension. It is pretty time consuming; only one of the three sets have been completed.

Edited by Guest

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Looking great Bob Painting is the easy part the prep is the crappy part. A rotisseri is always the best way to paint anything large because you can get the light to reflect off what you are painting then you can see what your doing. also being able to leave the surface flat also stops the runs. The main thing is make sure you lay up a light coat first then let it tack off then another light coat and let it tack off then you can put on a reasonable coat and this should all you really need

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Thanks Mark. Yes, I learnt the hard way that the painting goes best if the job is sitting flat-ish, and also is somehow held or suspended in the paint bay so that I can walk right round it: I have (temporary) strip lights all down one side of the paint bay, I go to the other side of the paint bay and get my head down so I can pick up the direct reflection and look over the entire coat looking for misses or light areas. If it's too late to apply further paint to a light area without disturbing adjacent paint, I have learnt to spray thinners onto the affected area to help it pull out flat. I'm surprised how well this works, provided you get it soon enough (though the first time I did it I held the gun too close, and blew the paint off, so ended up having to strip and redo the affected panel).

But I still don't know how to get round a fat leading edge without leaving some dry edge where the paint ends (when painting a wing one side at a time).

I have made a fair few mistakes along the way, and reworked more than I care to talk about, but have the gun fairly well figured out now, and am working with more confidence.

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Thanks Marty D.

I have been spray priming all the inner metalwork during the build, so yes I had some basic cheap spray gear.

But prior to starting the topcoating, I bought a better gun, put in the spray tent with ventilation and lighting, then progressively upgraded my spraywear/safety gear.

I wrote a section on basic build tools here, for the benefit of first-timers and novices like myself.

I'm intending to add a novice painting gear section to that soon.

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