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Another NEW Savannah S on it's way in NZ

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Today, shortened some A4 rivets:

 

I drilled a 1/8 hole in a hardwood block, to support the rivet while hammering the mandrel out.

Wood, not metal: and I then threw away the first 3 rivets. Reason being the underside of the head is not flat, it's dished, and the first couple or so get flattened. After that, the dished shape of the rivet imprints in the wood, and the rivets can be dismantled with the correct shape maintained. I assume the head pulls flat when the rivet is set, and this maintains some tension.

 

I then drilled and cut another bit of hardwood to allow me to put the rivets across the bench saw. Using the saw fence, I get a clean flat cut with all the rivets cut to the same length. The body of the rivet is approx 9mm long. I cut them back to 6mm.

 

They did the job fine at the rear of the rudder where the last A4 rivets are opposed left and right, although I had to put them in both sides.

As Rick said, the mandrel sticks out a tiny bit, but it's easy to clean up, although I shall cut some simple mask to protect the surrounding skin if there's much of this to do.

Excellent work! I'm sorry I wasn't available to post earlier... I learned to drive the stem out by supporting the head on a washer and tapping the stem out with a hammer. Then I cut the rivet with a rivet cutter, reversed the shortened rivet "right side up" and tapped the stem back in while supporting the rivet with a washer that was just slightly larger than the rivet body. This method supported the head well enough to keep it from being deformed.

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Thanks, Steve & Mcrowley.

Yesterday was visit from fellow builder (far more experienced than I) so I got a whole lot of helpful input, including Spraypainting 101. I've worked many tools in my life, but that hasn't included any 'serious' spraying, so that was very welcome.

Today I'm regrouping: wrapped carpet round the steel supports in the shed to avoid accidents there, and have hinged the top of the box (also with carpet) so I can use it as both storage and worksurface, open and close it easily on my own. I'm also shoving it right in a back corner, to give me some space for the prep/priming.

 

Someone on here split their time into Building or Logistics, so I suppose that's Logistics.

Though in my case, right now, it's Building or Logistics or Scratching-me-ass-trying-to-figure-out-the-next-bit. I'd say about 20/50/30, so there's plenty of room for improvement!

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Thanks, Steve & Mcrowley.

Yesterday was visit from fellow builder (far more experienced than I) so I got a whole lot of helpful input, including Spraypainting 101. I've worked many tools in my life, but that hasn't included any 'serious' spraying, so that was very welcome.

Today I'm regrouping: wrapped carpet round the steel supports in the shed to avoid accidents there, and have hinged the top of the box (also with carpet) so I can use it as both storage and worksurface, open and close it easily on my own. I'm also shoving it right in a back corner, to give me some space for the prep/priming.

 

Someone on here split their time into Building or Logistics, so I suppose that's Logistics.

Though in my case, right now, it's Building or Logistics or Scratching-me-ass-trying-to-figure-out-the-next-bit. I'd say about 20/50/30, so there's plenty of room for improvement!

Obviously it's your preference.... but I split the lid on my crate. In fact, I spit the lid crosswise in the middle and cut about 2" off the top edge of the crate at each end. This allows me to use the crate as a work table, but I can slide either half of the lid either direction to access parts. I am building in a two car garage so I don't have the space to take everything out of the crate and put it on shelves. I also put a caster wheel under each end of the 4x4 braces under the crate, this allow me to easily move the crate around the garage, even with structures sitting on top... just thought I'd mention what worked for me :-)

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Thanks, Mike, and that's a neat solution with the box lid. I do have some of the kit out on shelves, also separate worktable, but it sure has a way of spreading out once it's out of the box! Over here, we're heading into winter, so most of the prep/paint has to be inside now. Hence shuffling the workshop round a bit.

Just spent a little time looking through parts of your build log. You're certainly firing ahead there!

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Sounds like your getting into it Bob, hope your taking some photos for us, hint hint :smile:

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Sounds like your getting into it Bob, hope your taking some photos for us, hint hint :smile:

 

Are you test flying yet Guy? Hope you are taking some video for us, hint hint.

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Not yet Steve even though I sent all the paper off last Monday week I hadn't included the required data sheets and the required warning placard that goes on the dash and photo of proof.

 

I should've gotten the builders pack from Ra aust with all the required paperwork and info plus the warning placard but a mate printed the paperwork he thought all I needed for me and i went with that.

 

Hopefully this time next week it will be all sorted.

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Question: Wiring inside the stabiliser for the trim servo:

The trim servo mounts inside the left stabiliser tip. The wiring then runs through a hole which I must drill out to 13mm at the front of the tip rib. It is then cable tied inside the rear longeron, before emerging at a clearly measured point near the center underside of the stabiliser.

Assuming that is correct (?):

1. Is there any shrouding or chafe protection inside the stabiliser for this wiring?

2. It does say that grommets must be used. Are these supplied?

 

Thanks,

Bob

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I cut small fuel lines up about a inch all so long and cut make along the length to slip over the wiring where I cable tie to the rear longeron. There should grommets in the kit but I brought extra from a Automotive shop of various sizes.

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I cut small fuel lines up about a inch all so long and cut make along the length to slip over the wiring where I cable tie to the rear longeron. There should grommets in the kit but I brought extra from a Automotive shop of various sizes.

 

After I finished buying a handful at the bearing centre in town every other time I went to town for a while there, then I saw a kit of various sizes that all looked familiar on Ebay for about one quarter what I had been paying.

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Thanks, Guy and Steve. Yes, I'll put it on the town list for next time I'm in, see if I can buy a kit.

There's quite a lot of shopping at the start, isn't there?

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Question:

ST407, this is the main plate attached at the centre of the back longeron of the stabiliser. You can see something like it on Mark's Post# 51 (though mine is overbent at the sides, and bracketed by two more plates ST405 & ST406, so maybe the S is different).

Anyway, the ST407 rivet holes are well tucked under the overbends at either side, and neither my ground down air riveter, or my even more ground down hand riveter will get anywhere near pulling the rivets straight.

The solution would seem to be to take a skin off and rivet them from inside. Just when I was enjoying all the neat rivet heads on the outside.....

Is that correct?

 

Thanks

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Question:

ST407, this is the main plate attached at the centre of the back longeron of the stabiliser. You can see something like it on Mark's Post# 51 (though mine is overbent at the sides, and bracketed by two more plates ST405 & ST406, so maybe the S is different).

Anyway, the ST407 rivet holes are well tucked under the overbends at either side, and neither my ground down air riveter, or my even more ground down hand riveter will get anywhere near pulling the rivets straight.

The solution would seem to be to take a skin off and rivet them from inside. Just when I was enjoying all the neat rivet heads on the outside.....

Is that correct?

 

Thanks

 

Yours is different to Mark's because it is an S model and they are similar but different. I had to grind my hand rivet pliers down to reach those too, I suggest that you have been too gentle with the grinder.

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Yours is different to Mark's because it is an S model and they are similar but different. I had to grind my hand rivet pliers down to reach those too, I suggest that you have been too gentle with the grinder.

 

Sorry I see where you mean. Mine has a row down each side riveted from inside. Nothing else for it. I will try to find a photo. You should be able to fully build the frame then skin it.

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Sorry I see where you mean. Mine has a row down each side riveted from inside. Nothing else for it. I will try to find a photo. You should be able to fully build the frame then skin it.

Thanks for confirming that, Steve. If it was not so far in I could use a small extension tube on the riveter. But as it is, I see no other option.

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Spent the afternoon doing initial prep on elevator bits.

Starting to work smarter with my various deburring options (I hope).

Interrupted by Fallowdeer circling over my shed...

 

Today's Question:

Towards the wingtips of the stabiliser, the leading edge is riveted to the top and bottom skins only, with no inner support.

This seems very flexible, and I now think I've come across some reference to beefing it up. But I can't seem to find it.

Can anyone point me in the right direction on this one?

 

Thanks (yet again....)

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Thank you, Osteri. And a neat job too.

 

One could wish that all these ideas and improvements were gathered in one place...so that we do not spend our time re-inventing the wheel?

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I forget where... but somewhere gave the suggestion which I followed of using the left over L braces if you have the extended fuel tank (4 tank) option... Also, to reach those rivets, I really ground down my hand riveter and had a friend fashion a little 45 degree wedge with a hole though it the size of the stem. That way one face of the wedge faces the rivet square on, the other face allowed the rivet tool to be at an angle. Make sense?

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I forget where... but somewhere gave the suggestion which I followed of using the left over L braces if you have the extended fuel tank (4 tank) option... Also, to reach those rivets, I really ground down my hand riveter and had a friend fashion a little 45 degree wedge with a hole though it the size of the stem. That way one face of the wedge faces the rivet square on, the other face allowed the rivet tool to be at an angle. Make sense?

 

Thanks for that, Mike. I've missed the boat with the DIY stabiliser supports, unless I can think of some scheme without opening it up again. Which is pesky, to say the least.

But you certainly went the extra mile to get those rivets in at the back longeron! I have ground down my hand riveter, also used a drilled 'spacer' as you describe to get to tight places, but it didn't occur to me to angle the tip of the spacer. I was concerned that the riveter would be pulling at an angle, and so not pull the rivet down evenly.

In the upshot, I have put those rivets in from the inside, which is what one of the other builders on here has done. I think that will be okay, and from the various pics I have been able to find, I doubt they will be visible (?)

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Barely visible once assembled, look just in front of the elevator control horn (rivets without heads).

 

20160530_165052.thumb.jpg.024ad95d218da49651357f9f36401dc8.jpg

 

one of the other builders on here has done. I think that will be okay, and from the various pics I have been able to find, I doubt they will be visible (?)

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Barely visible once assembled, look just in front of the elevator control horn (rivets without heads).

 

[ATTACH=full]43377[/ATTACH]

 

Thanks for the detail, Steve. Yep, I'm happy with that. And the overriding object here is to have the stabiliser attached firmly to the rest of the aircraft!

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Scotchbrighting the outside of the skins before assembly:

On the one hand, it's relatively easy to do a thorough job of that on the bench.

On the other, it seems to me it opens up the metal to (further) oxidation, also results in a surface that will be harder to clean when the whole thing is together and it's paint time.

What does the voice of experience say?

 

Thanks

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Question: Plastic tail feather tips.

Some builders seem to use a strip of material sandwiched between skin and top/end rib as a mounting.

The kit now includes a bendable right angle bracket strip, but there is nothing to fasten that to towards the trailing edges of the Rudder/Elevator.

 

What is the current preferred method of attaching these?

 

Thanks

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