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Another NEW Savannah S on it's way in NZ

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Compressor spits dummy. Or, more precisely, has increasing trouble getting up to speed as we head into winter until it's blowing it's overload on start every time.

A bit like me, really.

And from this i learn a curious fact: most of the guys I know happen to have compressor in the shed, somewhere, which you're welcome to borrow. But when you get them home, all of them have problems, too. Well, three, so far. So I'm now running a sort of resthome for sick and ailing compressors.

And hoping it doesn't really take 30days for the warranty fix on my almost new one....

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Compressor spits dummy. Or, more precisely, has increasing trouble getting up to speed as we head into winter until it's blowing it's overload on start every time.

A bit like me, really.

And from this i learn a curious fact: most of the guys I know happen to have compressor in the shed, somewhere, which you're welcome to borrow. But when you get them home, all of them have problems, too. Well, three, so far. So I'm now running a sort of resthome for sick and ailing compressors.

And hoping it doesn't really take 30days for the warranty fix on my almost new one....

Always make sure the air filter is clean as it's surprising how a dirty / blocked air intake makes the compressor work hard.

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Always make sure the air filter is clean as it's surprising how a dirty / blocked air intake makes the compressor work hard.

Thanks, Blue, I'll bear that in mind. So far, in it's miserable life, this one has primed and riveted tail feathers, probably not even 12hrs running over 4 weeks. My theory is they've cut corners with the motor size, probably get away with it in warmer parts of the world. Eh well...

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I think if you sat a motion sensitive hour meter on the unit it might shock you how many hours a day you actually listening to it. Don't forget to wear your ear plugs because the riveter isn't innocent either and it is a lot closer to your ears.

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I think if you sat a motion sensitive hour meter on the unit it might shock you how many hours a day you actually listening to it. Don't forget to wear your ear plugs because the riveter isn't innocent either and it is a lot closer to your ears.

 

You're not wrong, Steve, although I've been pleasantly surprised...or was, until the darn thing packed up.

I deliberately bought a belt drive compressor of fairly large capacity, and it is surprisingly quiet...maybe wooden floor and ply walls and big wooden table help too.

I'm now borrowing a little direct drive screamer...now that is a nasty noise.

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Yes, I have the one piece wing tip. That kinda makes my point about the manual. My kit has the one piece wing tip, the new plumbing that simply joins the long range tanks to the nearest inboard tank, the new vent line for the collector tank, and the extended baggage compartment. The manual simply states "install wing tip" without offering any tips on how to do it. I did the first one in two days, the second one in 30 minutes. The new tank plumbing isn't in the manual at all, other material is scattered across three different sections, the references to various chapters, page numbers, and illustrations are usually inaccurate, and the master list of components is missing many of the parts. It seems to me that ICP has done an outstanding job of listening to pilots and updating the design, making it better and better. What puzzles me is why they don't do the same for the construction manual. Many of my pages are dated 2010... The good news is that the kit design, organization, and fabrication is fantastic and Valter della Nebbia here in Texas is an easy, helpful friend to reach out to at any time. More than a salesman, he is also a very experienced pilot (former NATO fighter pilot), builder, and superb instructor. He has been an excellent source for advice not only on construction but also in deciding which features and equipment to install based on the mission profile you desire.

 

Hi Mike. I also have the one piece wingtip, and am to the point where it says "install wing tip".

Rereading your comments (which I by now fully agree with) I'm hopeful I can save 2 days (minus and hour) if you'll tell me how it's done?

Thanks

BobI

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iBob, the way that worked best for me was to get the wings skins all riveted up, leaving the last few holes on the leading edge simply clecoed together. Next I strapped the wing down so that it can't move when is came time for a friendly shove with the wingtip. Next I eased the big, rounded, leading edge of the wingtip into place. With some wiggling, I then eased the trailing edge into place while applying pressure to keep the leading edge as tightly forward as I could. The clecoed trailing edge wouldn't allow the tip to drift aft, keeping the leading edge fairly rounded around the wingtip. Once I was satisfied that the tip was as far into the wing as I wanted (basically as far in as possible to give the rivets the most to grab, right to the edge of the "flat" area before the slope started), I then drilled one of the holes nearest the trailing edge one handed and snuck a clecoe into hole. Once that clecoe was in place, everything held nicely allowing me to methodically drill and clecoe each hole as I went, giving me a fairly flat and wrinkle free install of the edge. I started with the center of the leading edge, then alternately worked around the wing on both sides toward the trailing edge. I DO NOT recommend my first effort.... I placed the wing tip, drilled and clecoed it into position, then wrapped the leading edge around the wingtip much like the wing was done. Seemed like a good idea, but the straps caused dents that took much elbow grease to work out, I still have a slight depression in one place. So.... the second wing is better than the first! Oh well, my next airplane will be perfect! ;-)

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iBob, the way that worked best for me was to get the wings skins all riveted up, leaving the last few holes on the leading edge simply clecoed together. Next I strapped the wing down so that it can't move when is came time for a friendly shove with the wingtip. Next I eased the big, rounded, leading edge of the wingtip into place. With some wiggling, I then eased the trailing edge into place while applying pressure to keep the leading edge as tightly forward as I could. The clecoed trailing edge wouldn't allow the tip to drift aft, keeping the leading edge fairly rounded around the wingtip. Once I was satisfied that the tip was as far into the wing as I wanted (basically as far in as possible to give the rivets the most to grab, right to the edge of the "flat" area before the slope started), I then drilled one of the holes nearest the trailing edge one handed and snuck a clecoe into hole. Once that clecoe was in place, everything held nicely allowing me to methodically drill and clecoe each hole as I went, giving me a fairly flat and wrinkle free install of the edge. I started with the center of the leading edge, then alternately worked around the wing on both sides toward the trailing edge. I DO NOT recommend my first effort.... I placed the wing tip, drilled and clecoed it into position, then wrapped the leading edge around the wingtip much like the wing was done. Seemed like a good idea, but the straps caused dents that took much elbow grease to work out, I still have a slight depression in one place. So.... the second wing is better than the first! Oh well, my next airplane will be perfect! ;-)

 

Thanks for that, Mike. That's a great description, and I can see the sense of what you are doing.

I have also seen shots of a factory built S where the tip skin lifts between every rivet in a series of little waves, so they didn't have the tip held far enough forward. And it looks sh***y.

 

It's a trip, isn't it? And a learning!!

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Post #104 Another NEW Savannah XL on its way Not sure but I think the new versions the tips are different

 

 

Mark

 

Hi Mark, thanks for that. The newer tips are f/glass and do the whole wingtips, so probably not as challenging as what you had, but still there are hard and easier, good and not so good ways to get a good fit with them. And I'm trying as best I can to avoid re-inventing the wheel here, because it seems to me like no way to be moving forward?

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They will also need a couple of coats of spray putty with a sand between each coat to give any quality finish, They seem to have dispensed with gel-coat to save weight but you have to add something smooth to hang the paint on.

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They will also need a couple of coats of spray putty with a sand between each coat to give any quality finish, They seem to have dispensed with gel-coat to save weight but you have to add something smooth to hang the paint on.

 

Is the purpose of the new wingtips to make the plane a bit lighter?

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Hi all. Question: I see reference here to applying Sikaflex to the fuel tank mounts etc. This seems like a good idea.

Which Sikaflex would be best, as there are a number of different types?

 

Thanks.

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Is the purpose of the new wingtips to make the plane a bit lighter?

 

That is the only possible advantage unless they are also cheaper for ICP to produce. They don't give a better finish if that is what they were trying for. They may look better in Europe where weight really matters and wing tips are one of the few parts that get painted. The original wing tips would be no fun at all to polish.

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Hi all. Question: I see reference here to applying Sikaflex to the fuel tank mounts etc. This seems like a good idea.

Which Sikaflex would be best, as there are a number of different types?

 

Thanks.

Thanks, guys. Have been provided with 2 excellent alternatives...)

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That's the right inner tank. Fittings, left to right are:

Sight glass upper, Fuel return line, Sight glass lower.

 

Is this the correct setup, before I close this up?

Thanks.DSCF0633.thumb.JPG.5e28d4aa64bbdc0180a168ea75e56f8f.JPG

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Flying surfaces all assembled. Am now starting on the fuselage. My build table will be too high, but is easy to alter.

Can anyone suggest what are good build table dimensions for the fuselage???

 

Thanks.

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Not much wider than the finished fuselage or you spend far too much time reaching in over the edge of your bench. Put lots of bubble wrap on the boards that you put under it to hold it away from the clecoes. I got a little bit of bruising on my lower sheet when a blowing little storm went past my open carport where I was building and it moved on the timber even though it was well tied down.

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Once you get all the sheets clecoed up then a pair of rotating stands would be a better setup for riveting off the sheets. Two engine stands would be the go.

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Not much wider than the finished fuselage or you spend far too much time reaching in over the edge of your bench. Put lots of bubble wrap on the boards that you put under it to hold it away from the clecoes. I got a little bit of bruising on my lower sheet when a blowing little storm went past my open carport where I was building and it moved on the timber even though it was well tied down.

 

Thank you, Steve.

My build table is 1200 wide, it sounds as though I'd be best to put that to one side, as there's another builder wants it, and make the fuselage bench from scratch. Easy enough with cheap ply & tech screws.

Any suggestions about height? I'm a very average 5'9".

 

Thanks.

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Thank you, Steve.

My build table is 1200 wide, it sounds as though I'd be best to put that to one side, as there's another builder wants it, and make the fuselage bench from scratch. Easy enough with cheap ply & tech screws.

Any suggestions about height? I'm a very average 5'9".

 

Thanks.

Hi Bob

I reckon best height for you is worked out by arm straight at sides, hands outstretched, palms parallel to floor, height of bench is distance from palm to floor. Can also be calculated as dick height, but that's not very PC:oh yeah:

Cheers

Rick

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Hi Bob

I reckon best height for you is worked out by arm straight at sides, hands outstretched, palms parallel to floor, height of bench is distance from palm to floor. Can also be calculated as dick height, but that's not very PC:oh yeah:

Cheers

Rick

I must have long arms...or a short...nono, I've got long arms!!!

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Once you get all the sheets clecoed up then a pair of rotating stands would be a better setup for riveting off the sheets. Two engine stands would be the go.

 

I get to buy more tools! Do you guys also rotate the fuselage for painting, or is that not practical?

 

Yes, I'm trying to keep the bubble wrap between the build and everything else. But for all my care, I have one or two marks I wish I didn't have: nothing serious, but it's still frustrating...

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