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farri

Reminiscing! Ultralight Photos And Stories From The Early Days.

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Here's an ultralight that only a few of you might remember.

 

Believe or not, and depending on the interpretation of the rules, it actually complied with the weight and wing-loading rules of the first ANO 95.10 i.e. was under 115kg empty weight and had a wing-loading of less than 4lb/sqft ... It was built and flown in the late 1970s/early 1980s.

 

Looking at that tiny wing, how can that be? Anyone know the story(s) about the plane and who the builder was and what happened?

 

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I basically recall that the project may have attracted govt funding, but despite gaining some publicity and taxiing before the media I have no recollection or seen any evidence of it ever actually flying

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I basically recall that the project may have attracted govt funding, but despite gaining some publicity and taxiing before the media I have no recollection or seen any evidence of it ever actually flying

 

No, that must be another plane. This one certainly never received any government or other third party money, and was kept well away from the media because of the hassles DoA were giving to it and the owner/builder.

 

It did fly on quite a number of occasions, at one or more gliding airfields north of Melbourne and also at Essendon Airport ... briefly.

 

First hint - before building this the builder had worked with a major glider company and was/is a composites specialist. He also spent time with Burt Rutan in USA and consequently this plane features a fair bit of Rutan-ish Ezy technology.

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Here's an old picture taken at Mangalore 1984 by Australian Aviation Magazine photographer Rob Fox.

 

Anyone know the plane or builder?

 

Hint - there were six of them built, the first didn't have a T tail, the one in the photo is the second one, the rest of them were a bit larger. Later there was a side-by-side twin-engined two seat version.

 

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I'll be dammed, Wayne L, well done, You picture has caught me in the aircraft behind the amphibian. [ATTACH=full]48465[/ATTACH]

 

It looks very much like one I flew way back when......Is it a single surface wing?

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I remember one of my neighbours flying ultralights when I was a kid. These photos were taken 1978 somewhere outside of townsville. The older Gentleman in the photos was Jim Parker. Anyone know the aircraft? My Mum also flew this aircraft and managed to nearly break both ankles putting her feet down instinctively in front of the cross bar on landing :happy:

Ash .pdf

Jim Parker.pdf

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I remember one of my neighbours flying ultralights when I was a kid. These photos were taken 1978 somewhere outside of townsville. The older Gentleman in the photos was Jim Parker. Anyone know the aircraft? My Mum also flew this aircraft and managed to nearly break both ankles putting her feet down instinctively in front of the cross bar on landing :happy:

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Here's an old picture taken at Mangalore 1984 by Australian Aviation Magazine photographer Rob Fox.

 

Anyone know the plane or builder?

 

Hint - there were six of them built, the first didn't have a T tail, the one in the photo is the second one, the rest of them were a bit larger. Later there was a side-by-side twin-engined two seat version.

 

[ATTACH]48506[/ATTACH]

Wow that looks like a model.

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It looks very much like one I flew way back when......Is it a single surface wing?

Yes I think it is a Quicksilver.

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Wow that looks like a model.

 

Well, it sort of was ...

 

It was a bit of a cross between a Cri Cri, Hummelbird, Moni and an RC model, unfortunately the pictures are very old and heat affected, note the overwhelmingly complex instrument panel, fuel tank is between the knees and under the legs -

 

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Came across this classic:

rgmwa

 

Bunyips,

those pics were taken where I'm based at Donnington Airpark.

Have a watch of the documentary and you may see it flying :)

 

Jason

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Bunyips,

those pics were taken where I'm based at Donnington Airpark.

Have a watch of the documentary and you may see it flying :)

 

Jason

Classic!!! Thanks for that...

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I remember one of my neighbours flying ultralights when I was a kid. :happy:

 

My first attempt at flying was with a Wheeler Scout...I got it about three feet off the ground for about 100 mts and I was absolutely over the moon about it...Years later, I flew Jack Stewart`s Wheeler Scout a couple of times.

 

Jack had his own way of testing if the wind was ok to fly the Scout, he`d take out his hanky, hold it at head height and let it go, if it landed within a certain distance, away he`d go...He was always happy to let anyone fly it and I recall an experienced pilot flying it up on the Atherton Tablelands and ending up in Lake Tinaroo with it...He was injured and very lucky to have survived.

 

Yes I think it is a Quicksilver.

 

Thank you Ricard but I was asking about the one that SSCBD is sitting in...I flew the MX QuickSilver a couple of times... I`ve got a story about the MX also...A guy and his lady had an MX and they were trying to teach themselves to fly it but weren`t finding it easy! The lady had to go away for a while and gave the guy strict instructions not to touch the AC while she was away! The moment she was gone he jumped in it, got it off the ground and carried out a "Collision With Terrain", as they say! They re-built it but came to me to get their AUF certificate before successfully attempting to fly it.

 

those pics were taken where I'm based at Donnington Airpark.Jason

 

Jason, I recall being the first guy to give a CAA approved flying demonstration, in the Drifter, at an airshow at Donnington Airpark! Don`t recall the year though...Late eighties early nineties???...I do recall, on the day,a military helicopter landing too nose high after it`s display and hitting the ground with the main rotor.

 

Frank

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It was a bit of a cross between a Cri Cri, Hummelbird, Moni and an RC model,

 

HITC just came across this, looks very much like an early Cri Cri without the canopy, Um I noticed your heat effected photos, I have taken the liberty of attempting to fix them but this is the best I can do on what you supplied, hope you don't mind.

 

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On 2/15/2017 at 11:22 AM, Head in the clouds said:

 

First hint - before building this the builder had worked with a major glider company and was/is a composites specialist. He also spent time with Burt Rutan in USA and consequently this plane features a fair bit of Rutan-ish Ezy technology.

I remember that

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I still enjoy flying very much but it's nothing like the excitement and adventure of the early days. '84 mk3 Scout

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On 2/20/2017 at 4:51 PM, farri said:

 

My first attempt at flying was with a Wheeler Scout...I got it about three feet off the ground for about 100 mts and I was absolutely over the moon about it...Years later, I flew Jack Stewart`s Wheeler Scout a couple of times.

 

Jack had his own way of testing if the wind was ok to fly the Scout, he`d take out his hanky, hold it at head height and let it go, if it landed within a certain distance, away he`d go...He was always happy to let anyone fly it and I recall an experienced pilot flying it up on the Atherton Tablelands and ending up in Lake Tinaroo with it...He was injured and very lucky to have survived.

 

 Can’t remember exactly when but early 1980’s some guys called in at the Euroa Soaring Centre airstrip on their way home from Mangalore with what I think was a Scout.

 

Peter Johnson took it for a fly. It lifted off to about 10’ into wind but sank back to the ground when Pete turned cross-wind. He looked a bit comical with legs astride and running while the little engine screamed it’s head off as he came back to the threshold where we were all standing.

 

George Markey also called in there with his Ultrabat and gave us a demo of what it could do. He let someone fly it and they messed their landing by running into the back of a rather pristine Austin A40. George didn’t seem at all fussed about damage to either the Ultrabat nose or rear mudguard of the A40.

 

kaz

Edited by kaz3g
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When you regularly stare sudden and violent death in the face, life's mundane little problems pale into insignificance. Being "young" makes you immune from danger also. Were there many "ladies " flying this stuff? I can't recall many. Perhaps it came on later than 65.

   With Para drops it was another story, where I was. Plenty of women, keen to jump out of a perfectly good aeroplane,  and they seemed more relaxed than a lot of the blokes, who seemed very preoccupied with the wind "getting up".  I recall a lot of Autogyros and things like the Druine Turbulents all under DCA  I think. In the 50's   My favourite  welder and panelbeater built himself an all metal monoplane with VW motor and used it, probably teaching himself to fly and cutting the wings down eventually to make it go faster,

"Obsolete " planes were cheap to buy (not run), though I suppose it's all relative.. So were Houses. Though they weren't big enough to house an army as they are  today.. Nev

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Lol. Having mashed up my body in a car crash I can really appreciate the fact our house is only a 2 bed cottage - I can hobble around a 36’x36’ cottage on crutch- if it was one of the fashionable McMansions I’d be living in the garage due to steps n distances.  

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Referring to kaz,s recollections of incident a Euroa gliding field,  I recon I was also there on that day , if so the aircraft referred to was a brand new Robinso Bird and the prang was quite spectacular to watch , straight up stall , and strait down , as I remember chap escaped any major injury , but boy , did his missus pay out big time,

also remeber the George Markey modified saphire flying spectacular low level aero,s & the incident with the car,

was so impressed with the freedom of the ultralight that discontinued with the gliding lessons  & purchased a twin engined Tyro from Werner Becker shortly thereafter 

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