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How safe is the Jabiru?


Guest Cralis
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Whats the saftey record like of a Jabiru? Besides pilot error, and maybe... non-factory kit builds.. what is it's saftey record like here in Australia? They look very light and flimbsy, but I'm sure they aren't. I've never seen one up close.

 

Also, I may have misunderstood, but I think I heard the running costs sit at $50/hour inc Maint. Could that be right? That's like a car!

 

 

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I have a J230 and feel quite comfortable flying it. I have seen some broken Jabs where people have `walked away` yet the wrecks were rebuildable. They are very tough although only as safe as the pilot of course. Because of the shear amount of Jabs flying, they will appear to be over represented in the accident sections.

 

 

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Whats the main cause of accidents with the Jabiru? I understand pilot error could be a factor, and probably counts for most? But as far as mechanical failures is concerned... It's obviosuly not common (Or I guess the plane would be grounded), but generally, is it classed as a safe, well built plane?

 

If I was going to start helicopter lessons, it seems the R22 is a common training helicopter - but it seems to have a high failure rate.

 

 

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Guest basscheffers

Running cost depend very much on a) what you include in the costs and b) how much you fly.

 

You are probably taking a couple of grand a year in insurance to begin with. Then there is hangarage, landing fees, cost of finance, depreciation, etc. If you are a weekend flyer flying your own plane, you are probably looking at at least double that figure.

 

Obviously, I have no idea about your situation, just making sure you understand there is more to it than the statements of a manufacturers website or some rich guy that only counts fuel, maintenance and insurance and forgot he actually had to pay a lot of money up front or that he has an airstrip on his own property! (though for the latter you don't need to be rich, just live out in the middle of nowhere.)

 

Cheers,

 

Bas.

 

 

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Whats the saftey record like of a Jabiru? Besides pilot error, and maybe... non-factory kit builds..They look very light and flimsy, but I'm sure they aren't. I've never seen one up close.

Hi Cralis!

 

We just recently finished building a J160, it took us 3 years to do it.

 

I finally went up with my husband (you have to fly 25 hours out after build) and after a few nervous moments at first, the Jabiru is a really safe little plane. And from flying to and from Echuca, I enjoyed it immensely.

 

A little suggestion, go onto the Jabiru website and have a look at the testing highlights. You might be surprised! :thumb_up:

 

Linda

 

19-5026

 

 

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the Jabiru is a very sturdy bulletproof little aircraft, our school jabirus have well over 5000 hrs on the airframe, and every hour of that has been circuits and ab initio training, so they have proven their worth in the toughest of environments. they are simple design, which translated to exceptional reliability.

 

 

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Thanks Bass, Linda and UL.

 

I just did my trial flight in a J170, and .. what a pleasure. Felt pretty solid.. more than I thought it was going to be. Very nice.

 

 

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Tooradin Flying school (melbourne) operate 6 Jabirus 2xLSA, 2xJ160's and 2xJ170's although one of the J160's is turning into a J170. They've had a couple of bingles all due to pilot error. There is various speculation as to what the pilot error/s were/was but suffice to say it isn't airframe failure.

 

I did all my conversion training in a jab and had similar thoughts as to safety and reliability. After seeing a couple in peices and talking to the LAME I have a lot of confidence in the aircraft to bring me home safely again.

 

The jabs have been belted, thrown at the ground, run into thinks, chucked by cross winds into the deck and the pilot / pax still walk away relatively unscathed.

 

In saying that, be aware that they have a structural limitation like any other aircraft and if you're silly enough to push the limits (most of us are screaming:censored: and have got pukker factor 9 by now:censored:091_help.gif.c9d9d46309e7eda87084010b3a256229.gif087_sorry.gif.8f9ce404ad3aa941b2729edb25b7c714.gif:confused:) then the aircraft may well let you down.

 

I'm quite happy to sit my bum and one of my kids in one and fly Melbourne to Perth no issues....:thumb_up:

 

 

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Hi Big Pete, someone bent the J160 including 1 wing which required replacement. Given that the wings are the major cost in a 160-170 conversion we were only up for 1 wing plus the extra cost of the longer wing. There were also modifications made to bring the aircraft up to the current spec such as landing light, strobes, door catches, brakes, ASI, tailplane end-cap changes, wind struts and all that guff. The decision was made because the 170's are better performers for the school and aren't weight limited given that they are LSA versus 95.55 and repairing the 160 to within a similar weight to the original build would have been near impossible.

 

Cost wise around $16k including labour, however this only included the one wing for around $8k as the other wing had to be replaced anyway, so it would have been more like $24k if it was your aircraft unless you received a trade-in on the wings.

 

 

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One tough Bird

 

Flying out of Aldinga has it's disadvantages, such as a lot of vineyards. Those vine support pole are tough but the Jabbie is tougher. This plane was up and flying again in no time.

 

1140449950_Onetoughbird.jpg.c50a3bc75c8d7f085bd42f8cd9e92872.jpg

 

 

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Wire strike kit isn't an option as far as I know, but it could come in handy.

 

I've seen quite a number of smashed Jabs however luckily almost nil injuries in any of them. I've seen someone die in a Cessna with far less damage than some of the Jabs that have come to grief.

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Love the pic. When we flew in and out of Aldinga I did wonder how I would handle a power failure off that end. I didn't realize fly-by-wire was an option!

 

 

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  • 1 month later...

Testing

 

I agree that jabiru's are one strong little bird. Just go and watch this test highlight video they have on their website

 

http://jabiru.net.au/Video%20Clip/Jabiru%20Testing%20Highlights.wmv

 

It is unreal, especially suprised me the load they drop on the landing gear. And the nose is stressed to 1200kg!!

 

Anyhow, watch and learn

 

Chris

 

 

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I agree that jabiru's are one strong little bird. Just go and watch this test highlight video they have on their website http://jabiru.net.au/Video%20Clip/Jabiru%20Testing%20Highlights.wmv

 

It is unreal, especially suprised me the load they drop on the landing gear. And the nose is stressed to 1200kg!!

I did a lot of my training in the J160. After watching the video I wonder why the instructors were always worried about stress on the nose-wheel. ;) None of my landings were ever that heavy! :thumb_up:

 

 

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  • 5 years later...
Whats the saftey record like of a Jabiru? Besides pilot error, and maybe... non-factory kit builds.. what is it's saftey record like here in Australia? They look very light and flimbsy, but I'm sure they aren't. I've never seen one up close.Also, I may have misunderstood, but I think I heard the running costs sit at $50/hour inc Maint. Could that be right? That's like a car!

Hi I've been flying jabs for 18 years in all sorts of weather from one side of Australia to the other from Bunderburg toBusselton 300ks south of Perth and never let me down. For the past four years I've owned a j230d fully optioned which has allowed me to fly through some really horrific weather a lot of I.f.r. And has got me there safely. The cost I've found wright across the board to maintain and insure your aircraft properly has been approximately $135 an hour you might think that's a bit steep but my Jab is still as brand new keep your plane upto scratch and it won't let you down flown lots of different planes including G.A and still prefer my jab

 

 

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Maybe he meant I Follow Roads ifr or I Follow Railways ifr 100_please.gif.86b3bfbc115b0271e90584d59019e59a.gif and maybe the horrific weather was afternoon turbulence with a few scattered showers:freaked:

 

Because no one would be silly enough to post about illegal things that they do. Big brother is watching:typing:095_cops.gif.448479f256bea28624eb539f739279b9.gif

 

 

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