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willedoo

Qaher F 313 taxi test

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Look at still pic 1.06 minutes, clearly a model....when it's taxying no heat, from the tail pipe. What a joke, as bad as Kim dong's wooden rockets....Lol

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Looks tiny compared to the fence and bushes, even though it's closer.

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Check out the cockpit - they're using a Dynon D100, not even a SkyView system. Really? A multi=million dollar fighter, and you use a legacy Dynon display?

 

And where's the EMS? 3 x EFIS but no engine monitoring?

 

 

 

Kahir313_Kokpit.png

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I'm not ofey with modern fighter development so why is this hard to take seriously willedoo?

 

They have a history of faking sophisticated aircraft, drones and missile systems with either models, empty shells or photoshop.

This one looks very small, light (you can see it bump up and down while taxiing) and why would it be a twin engine at this size....

None are ever shown flying or display weapons systems etc

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Well we would have more to complain about if they did have a real contender, so maybe we should be thankful that this is what it is.

 

 

 

Besides it still looks cool, if Lsa could accept turbines it might be a nice package

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It looks like it is ready to start flapping its wings to fly off to the nearest tree.

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I'm not ofey with modern fighter development so why is this hard to take seriously willedoo?

 

Doug, I'd guess a lot of things as discussed above. A few things don't add up like the extremely small intakes - hard to imagine enough airflow there for a twin engine job. Also, there doesn't appear to be any nozzles, just a straight jetpipe by the look of it. And that wing configuration is too weird, it doesn't seem to fit any current aerodynamic development.

 

I'm no expert at aerodynamics, but I couldn't see it having any useful maneuverability. My best guess is that it's always been a propaganda mock up.

 

No doubt it's something they aspire to. They are smart people and are starting to manufacture a lot of native military equipment in recent years. They still have a long way to go.

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I've been looking at that video again and freeze framing. Apart from design flaws, in all the taxiing footage, the pilots head doesn't move - not a flinch.

In that situation, the pilot is normally looking at a lot of different things quite rapidly, usually some head movement. Maybe it's Bernie from 'Weekend at Bernie's'.

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The head does nod when the canopy is closing, like one of those dog dolls with the counterbalanced heads people used to have on the rear parcel shelf in the car in the 70s. The cockpit layout & instrumentation is a joke. I reckon they gave the local ultralight school a few thousand dollars to knock it up. Even has the coloured arcs on the ASI. It's a bit hard to tell but VNE looks to be around 160 knots.

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A company I have close relationship with here builds cold isostatic presses, one of their use is to build aerospace and rocket parts.

 

Often get approached to make them for Iran but it's illegal so no is the answer. Point is Iran have limited abilities to make certain parts required to this level.

 

For those tech minded, when parts are typically forged, a big press comes down over a mold. This forces a flow leaving a directional grain that is a point of failure (wood is a great example, super strong in one direction but easily fails along the grain).

 

A CIP has the part forged by putting it in a rubber mold in a fluid and raising that fluid's pressure to a hundred thousand PSI or more. The pressure forges towards the center from all directions surrounding the part and leaves no grain. The extreme pressures and vibrations rockets, missiles etc, offer can be withstood without failure points starting along grains.

 

That's a big CIP right there, as well as the little blue one on the left. The grey cylinder is where the parts are pressed inside, the red arch holds the lid on! The cylinder rolls in and out of the arch on rail lines. The double acting pump is on the right, and the control box closest. This is some of what I am involved in, in China.

 

CIP.thumb.jpg.d3bc27b5b8fa1c13335e30ddf0f508e3.jpg

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First glance it looks like just a small workshop with someone leaving crap all over the benches......

Then I spotted...stairs....... handrails.....faaarrrrk...

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The head does nod when the canopy is closing, like one of those dog dolls with the counterbalanced heads people used to have on the rear parcel shelf in the car in the 70s.

 

I imagine the flight tests will look similar to this then......

 

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