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Dress code


Guest Cralis
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Guest Cralis

It's getting into summer....

 

Is it acceptable to go for flying lessons in shorts?

 

Or would this be disrespectful, or possibly against the airmanship code?

 

Also, can you take a notepad with you on your flights?

 

Or one of those things that attach to your leg?

 

 

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Guest Michael Coates

No problem in shorts but you must have closed in shoes, eg NO sandels, thongs etc... and when learning use shoes that allow you to feel the pedals some of the bigger joggers have so much padding in the sole you cant feel the pedals or brakes.

 

 

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G'day Craig,

 

I'm not sure there is a single "dress code" as such for "recreational aviators".

 

There are many thoughts and opinions on what is appropriate, some would suggest full head-to-toe-to-hands non-flammable clothing, others would suggest wearing what's comfortable and applicable to the conditions. If you're not comfortable, this will distract from your concentration.

 

A lot will depend on the weather, aircraft being flown etc. i.e. based on my experience on the weekend - t-shirt, shorts and a vest are NOT suitable for flying a Tiger Moth...despite how warm it might be on the ground!

 

Regardless of what you wear (pants, shorts, long sleeves, t-shirt), I'd suggest something that is natural fibre / flame resistant and most importantly - comfortable.

 

Cheers,

 

Matt.

 

 

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Guest pelorus32

G'day Cralis,

 

I'm with Matt and Michael here: Natural fibres and closed in shoes. In my view long trousers are better than shorts for flame protection but truth be told it gets hot in the summer ;-)

 

Please remember also that many shoes are made of synthetic. Nothing like melted synthetic stuck to burned skin...go with leather shoes. Also little things like nylon watch straps...

 

As for a notebook - by all means. Many people carry a small notebook in their top pocket which they use for jotting stuff - times, call signs, etc. Leg boards are good if you get one that fits properly.

 

The reality is that you probably have your hands full at this stage of your training and a notebook might be one more complexity. Your judgement. When you get to doing navs you will need to work with a knee board or the like.

 

Regards

 

Mike

 

 

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Guest TOSGcentral

A few comments from myself on flying dress.

 

 

First up I strongly endorse Matt’s comments about ‘being comfortable’ as a prime concern. Then you have to be practical along with the comfort.

 

 

Dress is not based on any form of ‘Protocol’ in recreational flying so forget about that.

 

 

I agree totally with Michael’s words about footwear. I dress differently but light ‘feel’ footwear can be very important until you have built experience sufficient to be controlling the aircraft instinctively – the more feedback the better in early days. This is especially so on types that have toe or heel controlled wheel brakes.

 

 

Once with experience then you can look more at the practicality of protection. Personally I use common suede Riggers boots that extend to above the ankle but I only lace them half way so the tops can splay out and give me ankle freedom plus make them cooler to wear, I can tuck my long trousers into them so they do not snag on anything (getting the stick up your trouser leg when getting in can be an experience and totally ruins the image and getting the cuffs tangled in the rudder assembly may have a deplorable effect on control!).

 

 

Attention should be given to foot ware because in the event of a ‘nasty’ your feet are going to be the first on the scene of the accident and you may have reason to be still able to use them immediately afterwards.

 

 

Any laced foot wear you use should be ‘military laced’. That is the lacing should be horizontal across the boot rather than normal criss-cross commonly used. This is to enable the footwear to be quickly and easily cut off a damaged foot without causing more trauma.

 

 

If I am doing test flying where there is an appreciable element of risk of loss of control near the ground then I go to full flying boots that are nearly knee high. The ones I have are ex-WW2 heavy leather bomber pilot boots that give a huge amount of lower leg protection but are hot and not comfortable for protracted walking.

 

 

I personally prefer all of my body to be covered so full length trousers and long sleeves is the normal order. That also gets too hot so I tend to be in short sleeves and wear a flying jacket for flying. That is OK because I am usually in open or semi open cockpits but the flying jackets that I use are too hot for enclosed cockpits. Very light weight varieties are available though.

 

 

A main other attribute of a flying jacket is that it has pen holders and a zipped pocket on the left upper arm. It secures pens but you can also store a small whiz wheel, note pad and a rosary for emergency situations (if you are into that sort of thing!)

 

 

You can also take it off easily between flights to stay cool in warmer weather.

 

 

While in passing of that subject – there would be no objection to a note pad being taken if it was secured to a knee pad that was secured to your leg. I seriously doubt that you would have the time or inclination to use it in practice though. I personally prefer students to be concentrating on what they are doing (for value for money) and not writing stories about it as it happens!

 

 

Another important item which is not apparel but is body protection is using a good quality UV block agent for exposed areas. This is probably more applicable to those in very exposed cockpits or who spend a long time in the exposure of an airfield (instructrors).

 

 

I speak from direct experience here. I am a full (remustered) card carrying Pom and knew nothing of these things. Now in later life my right arm is a mess. The skin has weakened terribly after hundreds of hours in the right hand seat of open cockpits and nothing can be done about it. Do not go there – protect yourselves! Slip, Slop, Slap is not just for the beach – you get even more exposure on an airfield even if most of you is dressed!

 

 

The hands! I virtually always wear flying gloves but not just gloves per se. I need the tactile feel but I also need my hands and fingers externally dry for accuracy. I use military flying gloves that come well above the wrist. These also afford me protection in the event of fire so I will be able to use my hands for a short time at least.

 

 

On that score my last set are worn out well and truly and were to retire with me. That is not happening so anyone got a source of supply for them please?

 

 

Finally – the head. If flying in very exposed cockpits (Drifters, Trikes etc) then full protective headwear (helmets) must be worn. Personally, these days, I feel that a steel lined, fire proof jock strap is more appropriate as a number of modern punters apparently have balls larger than their brains!

 

 

Equally important is at least carry good quality sunglasses even if you do not normally wear them. Some flight/sun angles can be disturbing to the eyes and seriously impair your effective vision. The darker sunglasses also give you a much greater quality of vision of clouds – particularly on murky days and indifferent horizon reference.

 

 

I should also add that if you are flying, or just on the airfield sitting around waiting, then keep up your fluid intake and have a good pee just before you fly. Dehydration is insidious.

 

 

In summary for enclosed cockpit early recreational flying I would recommend – lightweight joggers, light jeans, T shirt, very lightweight flying jacket and flying gloves.

 

 

Aye

 

 

Tony

 

 

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Guest airsick
Equally important is at least carry good quality sunglasses even if you do not normally wear them. Some flight/sun angles can be disturbing to the eyes and seriously impair your effective vision. The darker sunglasses also give you a much greater quality of vision of clouds – particularly on murky days and indifferent horizon reference.

Interesting topic this. Sunglasses have been discussed here before and there are many that are more knowledgeable than me on the subject but I will put in my two cents worth here nonetheless.

 

The FAA recommends against using polarised sunglasses in flight for a number of reasons. Others will argue that polarisation and other features of sunglass lenses are not a problem but personally I prefer to go with the experts on this one. The FAA has a handy article detailing some of the problems with sunglasses, which is good for layman like me that don't fully understand what the issues are.

 

http://www.faa.gov/pilots/safety/pilotsafetybrochures/media/sunglasses.pdf

 

Worth a read in my opinion.

 

 

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Hi Tony,

 

There is a pilot supply shop in the Melbourne area that has the gloves that are to the military quality standard and are about $80.

 

Sorry can not remember the name of the shop, maybe old age:keen:.

 

Bob.

 

 

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Guest basscheffers

On the subject of sunglasses: get ones that have legs as thin as possible and sit tight against your skin. This is so they don't interfere with the seal of your headset.

 

I bought brand new, stylish and very comfortable prescription sunglasses just before I started flying. Of course they are the ones with wide, rounded away from the head legs. It is considerably more noisy when I am flying with them than without!

 

My insurance lets me claim glasses once a year, so I'll upgrade in a couple of months...

 

 

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Guest Cralis

Thanks for that, guys.

 

I do suffer from the heat quite a bit, and sitting in the aircraft before we're airborne can get extremely hot. So, besides the fire protection, shorts is acceptable? I have the ones with loads of pockets. So that and a cotten golf shirt would be acceptable and wouldn't offend anyone? I say this as I read somewhere that sometimes you're airmanship can be judged by your communication and your appearance (Besides other things), as most people only see you on the ground, and hear you in the air.

 

Then as far as sunglasses are concerned, I have a thing that when I speak to someone, I prefer to remove my dark sunglasses, and I prefer them to do the same, as a lot of communication and interaction is via eye contact (Well, I think so anyway). In the aircraft, I think this/my rule would change for a few reasons: Practicality - hands are full with other things; Safety - Don't want a pair of glasses lying about (Although my hang around my neck); Most of the time I'll be listening to the instructor/passanger, but 100% of my visual time would be on flying the aircraft.

 

However, my question is about the suitablility of my glasses. They're Oakly, and they're the ones that I feel impeed your perifiral vision. That is that you need to turn your head to look left and right, and they form 'blinkers' due to the thickness of the arms. I've found them to cover blind spots while driving. Does anyone have an opinion on these styles of glasses? 024_cool.gif.7a88a3168ebd868f5549631161e2b369.gif

 

Edit: Thanks Bass... you may have answered my question on glasses - get new ones? :(

 

 

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Guest airsick
However, my question is about the suitablility of my glasses. They're Oakly, and they're the ones that I feel impeed your perifiral vision.

I prefer glasses that don't impede your vision personally. Over and above that though I would be thinking about comfort. As Bass said, thick arms can impact the performance of your headset but also after prolonged periods may be quite uncomfortable to wear. This will become more apparent once you begin nav training.

 

I was recently looking for new sunnies and found most of the Oakley's were polarised. I would also be looking at that.

 

 

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Guest Cralis

Thanks AS.

 

Mine aren't polorised. I couldn't afford it at the time. :)

 

So, TopGun styled RayBans are the way to go?

 

 

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Guest TOSGcentral

Hmmm! The dark and mirrored glasses I used to use exclusively. They were excellent for cloud definition - by far the best I had experienced. But they are really dark and you have to remember that when approaching twilight (it may get darker earlier than you think it should!

 

As I drifted out of gliding I went for lighter types that are still darkish due to my own glare problem with my eyes. But I again endorse what has been said above. I go for large lenses and thin frames so I get minimum impediment to my field of vision.

 

 

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If you're after a pair of "headset friendly" sunnies, the Oakley Crosshairs have indented arms which are perfect for headsets and come in either polarised or non-polarised. I've been using them for a while with no complaints.

 

 

 

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The FAA recommends against using polarised sunglasses in flight for a number of reasons. Others will argue that polarisation and other features of sunglass lenses are not a problem but personally I prefer to go with the experts on this one. The FAA has a handy article detailing some of the problems with sunglasses, which is good for layman like me that don't fully understand what the issues are.

http://www.faa.gov/pilots/safety/pilotsafetybrochures/media/sunglasses.pdf

 

Worth a read in my opinion.

I agree with wearing none polarised glasses, because I have noticed looking through the car windows when the sun is on the right angle, you deffinetely end up seeing rainbows and other strange reflextions.......quite distracting and anoying some times....

 

Well that's my five bobs worth.... (only cause they stopped making 2s)006_laugh.gif.0f7b82c13a0ec29502c5fb56c616f069.gif

 

 

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If you're after a pair of "headset friendly" sunnies, the Oakley Crosshairs have indented arms which are perfect for headsets and come in either polarised or non-polarised. I've been using them for a while with no complaints.

They look awsome:thumb_up:, how much do they set you back:question:

 

Thanks

 

 

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Guest airsick
I agree with wearing none polarised glasses, because I have noticed looking through the car windows when the sun is on the right angle, you deffinetely end up seeing rainbows and other strange reflextions.......quite distracting and anoying some times....

I have also noticed problems with some instruments and aircraft windscreens too. I think it was a transponder (may have been a radio) where I had to tilt my head to one side to see the numbers. That's when I started looking into it...

 

 

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how many people dress in regards to fire protection? just watch air crash investigation, and how many serious injuries and deaths are caused by post impact fire, and the fact pax have to climb through burning fuel and debris?

 

 

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Clothing.

 

Don't worry about the image. Be practical. I would never poke fun at anyone who wore a flame proof suit, either, especially if the tanks are not in the wings. Light coloured cotton shirt. (white doesn't collect the heat from the sun). If it is cold,and you have to rug up with a coat, don't have large sleeve openings as they catch on everything. Don't have synthetic materials as they are not flame retardant and they melt onto your skin. I wear shorts in summer because I hate being hot. You do need to be comfortable.

 

If your aircraft doesn't have a heater, it can be an easy mistake to go flying with not enough clothing for altitude.

 

Sunglasses, I'm told that they should be designed so the light from the sides passes through the lens as well. (wrap around). I must say that I have rarely worn them. Can't ever remember landing with them on.

 

A cap with a peak. (unless you are wearing a crash helmet). I consider the cap almost indispensible. Turn the peak around to sheild the sun from the head, and necessary when the sun is close to setting, and you are landing into it.

 

Shoes, good comfortable leather with a rubber sole, so you can feel the pedals, and minimise slipping, and more flexible for differential braking. Undone laces are dangerous, but I find elasticised shoes get too tight for comfort. Nev

 

 

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Guest Marius Grobler

I think the "Oracle" dress rule applies. Legend has it that, when Oracle started up the had a very strict dress rule...

 

You had to come to work dressed.

 

 

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On the theme of sunglasses, I usually buy 'el-cheapo's' because I'll usually end up sitting on them or just losing them, but even in the cheapies there are things to look for...

 

1. As mentioned above, look for thin (read metal) arms to aid the headset seal.

 

2. Try to get fairly large lens's, you don't want the frames in your field of view, or light getting in the sides or top.

 

3. I find that graduated tint (dark at the top, lighter at the bottom) are better for reading maps and instrument panels.

 

4. My personal choice is to always go with a Brown tint as I feel is gives better edge and colour definition of the ground and clouds.

 

Greys Greens and Blues will just make the scene darker and hide details in smog.

 

As for clothing, shorts are OK in summer, jeans any other time and Darker coloured Cotton 'T's in summer (less reflections in the cockpit) and cotton 'Flannies' when it cools down.

 

Helmets are optional.041_helmet.gif.78baac70954ea905d688a02676ee110c.gif 006_laugh.gif.0f7b82c13a0ec29502c5fb56c616f069.gif

 

Remember, you can get dirty around aeroplanes, fuel, oils, exhausts, tires (barf!):yuk:

 

Oh, as an instructor, if anyone wants me to wear black trousers and tie with white shirt and epaulets, be prepared to pay double! 024_cool.gif.7a88a3168ebd868f5549631161e2b369.gif

 

Arthur.

 

 

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I have Serengeti sunglasses and find them very good. No problem with glass cockpit. They are not polarized but do have the tan lenses. Outside the cockpit polarized lenses are the way to go because they cut reflected glare, particularly off the road or bonnet while driving, but they can be a liability with electronic screens. This reflected glare is much less of a problem in the air. 024_cool.gif.7a88a3168ebd868f5549631161e2b369.gif 024_cool.gif.e4faea8b8d6d5d6e548e269d4b8acbd2.gif 024_cool.gif.7a88a3168ebd868f5549631161e2b369.gif

 

 

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I too swear by Serengetis K-man, but they can cost more than a half share in a Thruster. My current pair had an RRP of over $450.

 

I think Arthur might be onto something.

 

I like the look of Matt's Oakleys. Thanks for that. I dropped my Serengetis and have been putting up with a scratch for a while now.

 

You're right Rob. My tank is over my legs and I prefer not to think about it.

 

 

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